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Tuesday, April 24
 

8:00am

Acknowledgements
The Undergraduate Research Program would like to give a speical thanks to everyone who assisted in the organizing and planning of the 2017 Fall Symposium.

Tuesday April 24, 2018 8:00am - 8:00am
UNC Asheville

8:00am

Extended Acknowledgements
Wilma Sherrill Center Staff, Highsmith Union Staff, UNCA Foundation

Tuesday April 24, 2018 8:00am - 8:00am
UNC Asheville

8:00am

Mission Statement
The mission of the UNC Asheville Undergraduate Research Program is to provide students with a wide variety of research, scholarly and creative opportunities that support and supplement other education activities. The Program encourages students and faculty mentors to engage in the complete active research process, including design and implementation of projects and dissemination of results.

Tuesday April 24, 2018 8:00am - 8:00am
UNC Asheville

8:00am

Program Committee Members
Mark Harvey Director Undergraduate Research Program, Mila Lemaster Program Coordinator, Undergraduate Research Program, Mary Topper Office Assistant Undergradutate Research Program, Ed Katz Associate Provost and University Dean, Office of the Provost, Aaron Dahlstrom Social Media & Communications Manager

Tuesday April 24, 2018 8:00am - 8:00am
UNC Asheville

8:00am

UNC Asheville Foundation Inc.
For their continued support to the Undergraduate Research Program

Tuesday April 24, 2018 8:00am - 8:00am
UNC Asheville

8:00am

Faculty Moderators
Faculty Moderators: Gerard Voos, George Heard, Chris Bell, Sally Wasileski, Anne Slatton, Mariettta Cameron, Megan Wolfe, Marcia Ghidina, Lyndi Hewitt, Kelly Biers, Chris Hennon, Eva Bares, Grant Hardy, Jeremias Zunguze, Elena Adell, Melissa Burchard, Graham Reynolds, Angel Kaur, Bill Bares, Mahmut Reyhanoglu, James Perkins, Megan Wolfe, Sonya DiPalma, Jen Sanchez-Flack, Kirk Boyle, Ameena Batada, Erica Abrams Locklear, Dee James, Elizabeth Harvey, Mark Harvey, Mark West

OLLI Members: Howard Jaslow, Susan Eve

Tuesday April 24, 2018 8:00am - 8:01am
UNC Asheville

8:00am

Decomposition Behaviour Of HCFC-123 And Of Chlorocylclopropane Adducts
The objective is to prepare chemically activated CF3CHCl2 from the combination of CF3 and CHCl2 radicals. CHCl2I was synthesized to use photocatalysis facilitated by Hg2I2 for generating the CHCl2 radical. The unimolecular decomposition reactions were qualified by identifying the products, and the rates of reaction will be quantified based on the ratio of decomposed products using a 2010 Shimadzu gas chromatograph mass spectrometer, GC-MS QP2010. The intent of this study is to expand data on the degradation reactions that hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) will undergo, as they are a commercially important class of greenhouse gases, which are in the process of being re-engineered to be more environmentally friendly. Understanding these reactions is key to the efficient recycling of HCFCs. To date, CF3CHCl2 (also called HCFC-123) has been formed by the aforementioned photolysis process, and identified. We have also confirmed that the :CClCF3 carbene, formed by the 1,1-HCl elimination reaction, can be trapped using either cis- or trans-2-butene. We have not been able to detect formation of CF2=CHCl from a 1,1-HF elimination reaction. Thus, it appears that the 1,1-HCl elimination pathway is overwhelmingly dominant compared to the 1,2-HF elimination pathway, but quantitative data derived from the rates of these reactions and computational work to predict threshold energies for each pathway is needed. This semester's work has been to investigate a side reaction resulting from trapping the :CClCF3 carbene with either cis- or trans-2-butene. The resultant three-membered ring is an unstudied novel system, and appears too complex to analyze directly, but comparison to similar known systems yields a theoretical interpretation.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday April 24, 2018 8:00am - 8:20am
202 Zeis Hall

8:00am

Synthesis And Bacterial Assessment Of Modifications To The Core Of Depsidone
Depsidones are a class of natural products that exhibit antibacterial activity (MIC = 0.0825-8 ppm). In order to increase the antibiotic potency of the depsidone family of natural products, modifications in size and connectivity are being explored. Although a synthesis scheme for the core 6,7,6-fused tricyclic structure of depsidone exists, the yields of the final product are low. In an effort to increase the yields, a new synthetic scheme has been derived which involves Chan-Lam copper catalyzed coupling of boronic acid and a diol substituted benzene rings followed by deprotection and esterification steps to close the central ring. Following this same synthesis scheme, a series of analogs has been synthesized investigating the role that steric hindrance, electronegativity, and hydrogen bonding has on the activity of the compound. These changes will provide insight into the affect the electronic interactions have on antibiotic activity and potentially indicate the mechanism of action of the compound. All analogs synthesized will be evaluated in an antibacterial assay against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in order to build a structure activity relationship profile for the depsidones.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday April 24, 2018 8:00am - 8:20am
123 Zeis Hall

8:00am

Knight Guard
Knight Guard is a 2D Action-Adventure-Platformer that draws inspiration from various games like Mega Man X and Castlevania: Dawn of Sorrow. Knight Guard will have the player jump, battle and explore the crypts of Calupus. One of the major goals for the game during development is for it to be instantly intuitive and support a “Pick up and play” experience while also providing a challenging and enjoyable experience for the player. Championing current and refined game design practices while also looking towards older ones in hopes that game play will be very much intuitive for both experienced gamers and inexperienced a like. Knight Guard has been developed with the Unity Engine for the Windows operating system with possible expansions to Mac OS and Linux operating systems. One design goals is for the game to run smoothly on low end machines using simple sprite work and lighting effects. Minimum system requirements allow enjoyable playtime to those with laptops or those who might not have the financial resources to obtain a gaming PC. The presentation covers the structure of the game, inheritance hierarchies, mechanics, UI automation and other features like saving and graphical options. A live demo of the game will be presented.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 8:00am - 8:20am
125 Rhoades Robinson Hall

8:20am

Isolation, Characterization, And Antibiotic Extraction Of Bacterial Strains
Multidrug resistant bacteria pose a threat to human health due to overprescription and misuse of antibiotics, an industry of agriculture reliance, and the decline of novel antibiotic discovery. According to the CDC, at least two million people in the United States each year are infected with multidrug resistant bacteria and more than 23,000 succumb to those infections. Natural product (NP) isolation remains a robust source of novel antibiotics even though rediscovery is an ongoing problem. This research reports the isolation of 101 bacteria from soil samples collected in the Southwestern United States and subsequent antibiotic screening of those bacteria. Bacteria from a library of isolates found to be strong antibiotic producers were then identified by 16S rDNA analysis and subjected to scale up and extraction to isolate the produced antibiotic. Currently, antibiotics produced by three bacteria, a Bacillus strain (SS729), a Microbacterium strain (SS452B) and a Pseudomonas strain (SS827B) are being characterized. SS452B was found to have antibiotic activity against Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus while the other two, SS729 and SS827B were found to have antibiotic activity against both Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus and Gram-negative Escherichia coli in liquid inhibition assays.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday April 24, 2018 8:20am - 8:40am
014 Zeis Hall

8:20am

Development Of A Reconstitution Protocol For ATP Synthase With Various Lipids
H+ transporting ATP synthase is a remarkable molecular machine that catalyzes the synthesis of ATP by use of two coupled motors, F0 and F1. The use of H+ electrochemical gradient drives rotation of the c ring which couples with the F1 domain to induce conformational changes that catalyze the formation of ATP form ADP and inorganic phosphate. The F0 section of ATP synthase is primarily embedded in the membrane, so it is possible that lipid contacts and composition could play a role in proton translocation and function. Cardiolipin, a phospholipid that comprises a significant portion of the inner mitochondrial membrane, residues have been seen using electron cryo-microscopy. These lipid effects could be essential for normal function. A protocol for reconstitution of ATP synthase will be developed, with emphasis on different techniques for detergent removal and liposome recollection.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday April 24, 2018 8:20am - 8:40am
123 Zeis Hall

8:20am

Photodegradation Of Trichloroethylene In The Presence Of Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles
With the increased presence of common industrial waste solvents in the nation’s water supply, it has become imperative to employ affordable and commercially-practical water purification methods. One such method involves the use of Titanium Dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles (NPs), which offer new options for water filtration due to their nanoscale size and corresponding large overall surface area. TiO2 is widely available, and non-toxic, making it an attractive option for removal of organic contaminants from water. These NPs exhibit photocatalytic characteristics in the presence of the organic contaminants and ultraviolet light, while remaining inert in the absence of UV light. In this study, the effectiveness of TiO2 NPs as a base material for the photodegradation of the common industrial contaminant trichloroethylene (TCE) is explored. Preliminary data suggest that TiO2 is an effective medium for the removal of TCE from aqueous solutions.

Moderators
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Tuesday April 24, 2018 8:20am - 8:40am
202 Zeis Hall

8:20am

Escape from Roswell
Game development is now more accessible than ever before. With resources like the Unreal Engine 4, professionals and hobbyist alike are now capable of easily diving into the world of game development. Escape From Roswell is a 3rd person action platformer built to demonstrate the ease of professional game design. In the game, the player assumes the role of an alien who has crash landed in Roswell, New Mexico. Frantic and unaware of this new world, the player must find a way to the elusive Area 51 where the military police has taken their spaceship. In this presentation, we discuss how Unreal Engine 4's visual programming allows quick prototyping and implementation. We also explain our approach in developing Escape from Roswell from concept to an actively immersive experience that explores desert landscapes and that allows the player to battle dynamically responsive enemies.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 8:20am - 8:40am
125 Rhoades Robinson Hall

8:20am

Merging Environmental And Relationship Marketing To Promote Environmental Preservation
By applying relationship marketing theories and tactics to environmental marketing, this study will attempt to formulate an improved marketing structure to be utilized by Asheville GreenWorks in their “Love Your Trees” campaign. The objective of this research is to examine strategic communications tactics that can help promote long-term environmental activism. This study seeks to synthesize information, identify causes of the inadequacies in environmental marketing and formulate solutions. In addition to psychological and marketing theories, data collected from press releases as well as social media posts, comments and responses of successful environmental organizations will be utilized as analytic tools. Studies on conservation psychology will be fundamental as well. This study broadens the literature on environmental marketing theories by synthesizing relationship marketing and communication techniques to clearly illustrate the process of creating emotional connections between individuals, organizations and the environment.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 8:20am - 8:40am
316 Karpen Hall

8:40am

Development And Evaluation Of A High-Throughput Screening Method For Bacterial Antibiotic Production
Due to the misuse and overuse of antibiotics, the number of multi-drug resistant bacteria continues to rise. To fight this growing threat, new methods for discovering novel antibiotics must be developed. Natural products produced by microorganisms continue to be a robust source of novel antibiotics. Unto today, a rudimentary method that can screen natural sources accurately and efficiently has yet to be established. Current methods for screening bacterial libraries for antibiotic production are either highly complex or inefficient and prone to error. Herein, a rapid and robust high-throughput liquid culture screening method for antibiotic production by bacteria is described, which has the ability to screen both single and multicultural mixtures of bacteria in vitro. Over 300 bacteria were screened in monoculture, and 12% and 15% were found to produce antibiotics capable of ≥30% inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus or Escherichia coli respectively.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday April 24, 2018 8:40am - 9:00am
014 Zeis Hall

8:40am

Computational Investigation Of Alcohol Dehydrogenation On An Extended Stepped Rhodium Catalyst Surface Using Density Functional Theory
Since the industrial revolution, an increased demand on fossil fuels as the predominant source of global energy have brought upon many harmful consequences, such as environmental pollution, climate change, and depletion of Earth’s non-renewable natural resources. Proton-Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cells are being researched as an alternative to generate electricity and hydrogen gas is used as fuel. However, hydrogen gas is not abundant in nature and has to be derived from hydrogen containing molecules like fossil-fuel hydrocarbons. Complex alcohols and carbohydrates are a sustainable alternative. These compounds contain long chains of hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon atoms. Transition metal catalysts, such as rhodium (Rh), can be used to break the C-H, O-H, and C-C bonds of these molecules to release hydrogen gas as byproduct. But a better understanding of the catalytic reaction mechanisms is needed to fully utilize complex alcohols for hydrogen generation. For this research, the computational method periodic density functional theory (DFT) is used to investigate C-H and O-H bond cleavage over a Rh metal catalyst. There are different types of catalytic metal lattice structures, such as planar, stepped, and kink surfaces. Recent studies have shown that the stepped and kink surfaces are more reactive and allow compounds to bind much stronger to the metal surface. By using periodic DFT, this project will investigate the reaction mechanisms for breaking C-H and O-H bonds of alcohols using an extended stepped Rh(211) catalyst surface. The results will be compared to previous research done on the O-H and C-H bond cleavage of the same alcohols on a planar Rh(111) surface to further understand the catalytic properties of the stepped rhodium surface.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 8:40am - 9:00am
202 Zeis Hall

8:40am

Role Of The Iridium-Nitrogen Interaction In Catalytic Transfer Hydrogenation
Transfer hydrogenation is the process of adding hydrogen to a molecule from a non H2 source. This process is more efficient than direct hydrogenation because the non H2 sources are more readily available and inexpensive compared to H2 sources. Many different metal catalyst attached to ligands have been used to determine which is best for the reaction as well as the most efficient way to get to the end product. We will use an iridium catalyst along with a non H2 source to determine which hydrogen from the source goes where on the molecule. In addition to finding out if this process is going to be stepwise or concerted.

Moderators
Speakers

Tuesday April 24, 2018 8:40am - 9:00am
123 Zeis Hall

8:40am

Right Recipes
Food is important to us all. However, it is not always easy for a person to determine which food is beneficial for individual needs. Right Recipes is a web application that seeks to offer a different view of food preparation by offering menu suggestions based on provided health concerns. The stored recipes can be sorted based on diet restrictions. The system assigns tags that helps track an individual's needs and habits. Users can create accounts, take suggestions, and make suggestions. The site is designed to facilitate easy navigation for users regardless of technical background. In this presentation, we showcase the representations and methods learned in the course Web Technology used to create this application.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 8:40am - 9:00am
125 Rhoades Robinson Hall

8:40am

Bridging The Gap: Internships And Environmental Activism
This paper represents a two-part strategic communications project designed for a local environmental non-profit organization, Asheville GreenWorks. First, a situational analysis and strategic communications plan were written in fall 2017 as part of a service-learning course. Next, the creation of a media toolkit for interns to implement the strategic communications plan began in spring 2018. Because non-profit organizations typically have minimal budgets, these organizations depend on volunteers and interns to carry out their various activities, events, and media plans. Internships not only provide an important service for non-profit organizations, but also allow students to implement strategic communication plans in real-time to better understand how tactics can further an organization’s mission and public relations objectives.

Moderators
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Tuesday April 24, 2018 8:40am - 9:00am
316 Karpen Hall

8:40am

Effectiveness Of Equine Facilitated Psychotherapy For The Treatment Of Psychiatric Disorders
Psychiatric disorders, primarily those such as Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Social Phobia, Depression and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, affect a large amount of the population. It is approximated that 1 in 5 individuals suffer from conditions that can be classified as mental disorders. Current treatment for a range of these psychiatric disorders is centered around approaches such as Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, as well as are often supplemented by the use of pharmaceuticals. This method has not been proven to be particularly effective in treating such disorders, particularly ones such as PTSD, anxiety and depression.The possession of such disorders tends to have co-morbid effects, such as lowered self-esteem, social skill deficits, and underachievement, both academically and professionally. Due to the multitude of negative outcomes for those with these conditions, research has been facilitated in order to propose new approaches to provide solutions with higher efficacy in the treatment of patients suffering from such conditions. Equine Facilitated Psychotherapy is one such method that is beginning to receive support from both the traditional medical, and holistic medicine, communities. EFP is centered around utilizing traditional Cognitive Behavioral Therapy approaches in conjunction with specifically developed activities to incorporate equine animals into the treatment plan. This approach is beginning to acquire an evidence base to support the practice, and a higher number of patients are beginning to choose this method, due to its' numerous benefits and potentially long-lasting effects.

Moderators
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Tuesday April 24, 2018 8:40am - 9:00am
406 Sherrill Center

8:40am

26 South Main Street
We see that small towns are changing rapidly around Asheville. Is there something in small towns worth preserving? This documentary looks at the shift from a manufacturing and transportation based economy to an arts-based economy in Marshall, NC. We explore how this affects residents by looking through the lens of this family hardware store, and paralleling them with emerging art scene.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 8:40am - 9:00am
012 Karpen Hall

8:40am

Working Toward a Pedagogy of Activism:  How Whites Approach Issues of Social Justice Interpersonally
The purpose of this research is to investigate ways that college-aged white students approach issues of social justice interpersonally, primarily within their most intimate relationships wherein conflict and disagreement take place in complex and under-examined ways. To approach this study through a critical lens of whiteness necessitates a discussion of prior-conducted research on what we know about how whites talk and think about race. This literature has wide implications for advancing our collective understanding of how whites reproduce white racial dominance through color-blind ways of thinking, lack of critical awareness and discussion of whiteness, and lack of critical self-reflection. These investigations explore how white children undergo racial socialization, largely based upon the decisions and parental priorities of their guardians. Building off of these ideas and evidence, my research will investigate how white college-aged students understand their whiteness and their approach to activism as a result of their academic experiences. I will explore how these understandings then play out in familial and intimate relational interactions. In other words, as their understandings of whiteness evolve, how do white college-aged students racially socialize their families and close friends?   My research has also led me to recognize gaps in the literature surrounding what we know about the practice of teaching activism. Based on the literature I’ve observed, pedagogies of teaching and instilling consciousness of social justice and activism in educative settings lack any integration of critical whiteness theory as well as discussion of strategy for mediating personal and political points of contention with people they love. My research methodology has involved engaging seven college-aged white students in reflective dialogue surrounding questions of racial socialization, activist participation, academic experiences, and how these relate to and inform familial relationships. In response to the information and material I’ve collected, I argue that as we work toward developing a pedagogy of activism, we must consider tools for bridging gaps between white students and their families and simultaneously develop opportunities and space for more nuanced discussions of social justice with students before they reach higher education. Furthermore, I suggest an imperative move toward a careful integration of critical thinking surrounding our own identities and standpoints, with an ethic of love and care as we continue to navigate complex questions of how to be useful participants in political and social discourse as white students and graduates.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 8:40am - 9:00am
236 Zageir Hall

9:00am

Inducing Gene Expression Of Major Urinary Proteins In The Female Murine Liver Cell Line Hepa1-6
Mice, Mus musculus, are a primarily nocturnal species that rely heavily on their olfactory system to detect changes in their environment. Specifically, mice rely on protein pheromones, the Major Urinary Proteins (MUPs), non-volatile molecules which are detected by the vomeronasal organ (VNO). MUPs are synthesized in the liver, excreted in the urine, and serve as genetically encoded pheromones which direct social behaviors such as countermarking, aggression, or mate preference. Mice can also use MUPs as a way to detect sex, status, and identity of the emitting individual. MUP expression is thought to be controlled by a set of hormonal axes consisting of testosterone, growth hormone, and thyroxine. The mouse genome encodes 21 MUPs, yet, each adult male mouse will express a unique set of 4-12 MUPs. The mechanism by which MUPs are chosen for expression is non-random but not well understood. This study looks to understand how individual MUPs are chosen for expression by utilizing a cell culture model system. The female murine liver cell line Hepa1-6, is being used because it does not endogenously show expression of any MUPs, but previous studies have shown that female mice are capable of producing MUPs at male levels if they are exposed to testosterone. A combination of hormonal and drug treatments consisting of methylation inhibitors and deacetylation inhibitors are being used to induce MUP expression in these cultured cells. Following treatment of cells, they are harvested for RNA isolation, and the resulting cDNA library is examined for MUP expression. The results of this study using the chosen concentrations and treatment periods are not sufficient to induce MUP expression. As such, a working protocol for the induction of MUP expression is yet to be established. The creation of a working protocol will in the future contribute to the greater understanding of gene expression.

Moderators
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Tuesday April 24, 2018 9:00am - 9:20am
014 Zeis Hall

9:00am

Budget Buddy
Budget Buddy is a program that was built because it is often common for humans to keep track of money and figure out the smartest way to spend it. This program is meant to help find a good spending budget and help people stick to it. Budget Buddy is a Java application that calls remotely to a PostgreSQL database where line items are stored. A user inputs various details about their life and those details are then stored in the database and used to come up with a proper spending budget. The program is designed in a way that is intuitive to all users no matter what stage of life they may be in. Budget Buddy is intended to communicate helpful feedback and is meant to be easy to follow. The goal of this program is for anybody to be able to use it.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 9:00am - 9:20am
125 Rhoades Robinson Hall

9:00am

Indicators Of Value: The Effects Of A Home’s Features On Its Final Selling Price
Multivariable regression is used to analyze a dataset of properties compiled from the Multiple Listing Service (MLS) - a service used by realtors to list and find properties. The dataset includes information regarding each home’s features, such as number of bathrooms, bedrooms, square footage, acreage, exterior material, number of fireplaces, types of flooring, etc. My results demonstrate which of the observed features show statistical/practical significance in determining the final selling price of a home. The data is split into two equal halves and the same regression equation is run on both halves to internally replicate the study. The study is internally replicated to address the concern over p-hacking in the academic community and ensure the integrity of my findings. Previous research in this area shows that the inclusion of premium features - such as brick or stucco exteriors, decks, and hot tubs - positively influence a home’s selling price. This project contributes to this literature by establishing a curb appeal rubric and applying this rubric to the dataset. Curb appeal encompasses the attractiveness of a property when viewed from the street. The results of this project will demonstrate the potential impact of both a home’s curb appeal and features on its value. This topic could be of interest to many current/potential homeowners in the community and would be of particular interest to realtors/builders.

Moderators
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Tuesday April 24, 2018 9:00am - 9:20am
035 Karpen Hall

9:00am

Death Of An Immigrant: Tragedy And The American Dream In Arthur Miller’s Death Of A Salesman And Cristina Henriquez’s The Book Of Unknown Americans
No working universal definition of tragedy that scholars can agree upon exists. Nevertheless, tragic theorist, Richard Palmer, provides what I find to be a sufficient and broad definition, which states that tragedy creates a conflicted response of attraction and repulsion in the audience. Arthur Miller’s Death of a Salesman and Cristina Henriquez’s The Book of Unknown Americans are both works of literature that arouse this type of ambivalent response from their audiences. For this thesis, I provide an analysis of how certain elements from each text combine to lead the audience to the emotional response that Palmer’s definition describes. Drawing from traditional conventions of tragedy and analyzing debates on how tragedy manifests within a modern and uniquely American framework, I examine tragedy in the context of its place in the novel and drama, the tragic hero versus the common man, the role of fate and institutions, hamartia, “plotters” and other tragic catalysts, and the nature of American consumer culture – all within the frameworks of Death of a Salesman and The Book of Unknown Americans - to convey the contradictions between the promise of the American Dream and the deplorable conditions and unfortunate circumstances of the books’ characters, calling readers to reflect on the promise of upward mobility that is embedded in the American Dream within the modern United States: the American Dream depicted as desirable but not attainable for everyone depending on their individual circumstances.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 9:00am - 9:20am
232 Karpen Hall

9:00am

Social Media Communications Project
This paper represents a two-part strategic communications project designed for Asheville GreenWorks, a regional nonprofit in Buncombe County. In part one, a situational analysis and strategic communications plan for social media were written as part of a fall 2017 service-learning course. In part two, implementation of the social media plan began in spring 2018. This two-step approach allows for the examination of the planning and implementation of a full-scale strategic communications project focusing on three major social media platforms – Instagram, Twitter and Facebook. To assist in the implementation of the plan, data were collected using social media analytic tools to understand best practices for the various social media platforms. The implementation of this strategic communications plan broadens the understanding of the benefits of social media for nonprofit organizations.

Moderators
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Tuesday April 24, 2018 9:00am - 9:20am
316 Karpen Hall

9:00am

A Review Of Double Up Food Bucks As A Strategy To Improve Health
Diet-related chronic diseases are among the leading causes of death in America. Many of these conditions are preventable and reversible through changes in diet, particularly by increasing the consumption of fresh fruits and vegetables. As these diet-related chronic diseases affect lower socio-economic classes disproportionately, many organizations employ strategies to influence fresh produce consumption among these populations. One such strategy is the Double Up Food Bucks (DUFB) program developed by the “Fair Food Network,” which incentivizes the purchase of fresh produce by Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) recipients. The aim of this study is to examine the literature on the effectiveness of DUFB programs on increasing healthy food consumption and improving health. This study is a narrative literature review. The methods include a search of relevant articles and an examination of incentivized nutritional programs as compared to nutritional education efforts and to restrictions on purchases. The review also seeks to summarize the progress and results of the many nationwide DUFB programs. Search terms included SNAP, DUFB, healthy food incentives, food access, and effects of incentives on health/nutrition. This review includes three randomized controlled trials, six reviews and longitudinal analyses, two longitudinal quasi-experimental studies, one mixed- method study, one case study, one cross-sectional survey, and one graduate thesis, as well as data reported by the “Fair Food Network” in their annual reports. This paper also highlights obstacles and barriers to reaching target populations. The review summarizes opportunities for future research on the impact of incentive programs on health behaviors and exposes gaps in program outcomes. Analyses suggest that incentivized nutritional programs are effective in increasing the purchase and consumption of fresh produce among SNAP recipients, but also that this strategy may have limited impact on improving the overall health of this population.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 9:00am - 9:20am
406 Sherrill Center

9:00am

STEAMy
This documentary will be about UNC Asheville's science, technology, engineering, art, and technology (STEAM) studio. We will show the facility and its upcoming projects, specifically the projects being worked on with the artist Mel Chin. The film will highlight the area around the STEAM studio and its role in the Asheville community

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 9:00am - 9:20am
012 Karpen Hall

9:00am

A Comparative Analysis Of French And Portuguese Phonologies Using Optimality Theory
French and Portuguese both belong to the Romance language family, which is typically defined as the languages that have evolved from the Latin left over by the Roman conquest. At first glance, these two languages may seem wildly dissimilar, as both French and Portuguese are regarded as being rather phonologically different not only from one another, but also from Italian, Spanish, and Latin. However, taking a deeper look at these two languages shows that they may in fact be more similar than imagined. Both French and Portuguese do interesting things to avoid (or emphasize, in some cases) hiatus, or the break between two vowels that have come together as parts of separate syllables (like in the English word cooperate). In order to investigate the phenomenon of hiatus as it occurs in these two separate phonological systems, I have employed a linguistic theory known as Optimality Theory (OT). OT is a linguistic model that proposes the observed forms of language arise from the optimal satisfaction of conflicting universal linguistic constraints. By way of OT, it is possible to conduct a comparative analysis of the phonologies of French and Portuguese, and to see just how similar (or dissimilar) these two languages actually are. I am making use of the comparative analysis of French and Portuguese to test the universality of constraints proposed in individual accounts of French and Portuguese hiatus repairs, which is an important step to reach a better understanding of not only French and Portuguese, but also the universality of constraints functioning within the context of OT.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 9:00am - 9:20am
012 Whiteside Hall

9:00am

A City In Red: The Effects Of Redlining And Urban Renewal On Black Women In Asheville
Housing is an issue that affects individuals in nearly every aspect of their lives. Substandard housing can have severe negative effects on mental and physical health, ability to find and secure a job, and even ability for individuals to locate different housing options in the future. In the United States, a long history of redlining and urban renewal has resulted in Black individuals being negatively impacted by the current housing system much more so than other racial groups across the country. Additionally, negative ramifications are often felt more strongly by Black women living in communities that have been subjected to urban renewal. To study this situation more in-depth, the history and contemporary effects of redlining and urban renewal in the city of Asheville, North Carolina will be examined, with a focus on the lived experience of Black women. This will be accomplished through a content analysis of oral histories from Black female residents in Asheville along with other historical documents regarding urban renewal. This study takes an intersectional approach to research, examining how the dual identities of being Black and being a woman work together to give Black women a unique experience with redlining and urban renewal.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 9:00am - 9:20am
236 Zageir Hall

9:10am

Characterization Of Unimolecular Elimination Reactions For CD3CD2CHFCl
Hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) are greenhouse gases and can deplete the ozone layer. To stop further adverse effects, the Montreal Protocol requires HCFCs to be collected and destroyed by 2020 for developed countries and 2030 for developing countries. We studied the decomposition reactions of CD3CD2CHFCl as a model system to emulate HCFCs currently in use to better understand how they would react when subjected to high temperature in a destruction chamber. The unimolecular reactions of energized CD3CD2CHFCl molecule are 1,1-HCl, 1,1-HF, 1,2-DCl and 1,2-DF elimination with a ratio of 0.16: 0.004: 0.82: 0.013. All elimination pathways form cis- and trans-alkenes and the ratio varied from 1 to 3.5. The data collected shows that 1,1-HX (X=Cl, F) elimination reaction, forming a carbene, can became the dominant degradation pathway at high temperatures. After all results have been collected, they are calibrated to account for the fact that different molecules fragment differently. Calibrations using the stabilized product were done via proxy because some pure samples could not be acquired. Calibration factors are multiplied to the data and ranged from 1.71 to 8.38. By studying these degradation pathways, we can better understand how to destroy them or convert them into feedstock for other industries after they are all banned.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 9:10am - 9:30am
202 Zeis Hall

9:10am

Synthesis and Antibiotic Assessment of Pestalone Derived Aryl and C9 Analogs
Pestalone (1) is a natural product first isolated by W. Fenical et al. in 2001 from a cofermentation of a marine fungus and antibiotic-resistant marine bacterium. It was reported to have highly potent antibacterial activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MIC = 37 ng/mL) and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium bacteria (MIC = 78 ng/mL). Consequently, this made pestalone a promising, new antibiotic compound. Due to its challenging chemical structure, total synthesis of 1 has only been achieved by Iijima et al. and Slavov et al. Unfortunately, the latter group reports multiple difficulties during and after total synthesis which include the facile intramolecular cyclization between the C9 aldehyde and bridging ketone forming a lactone, rendering it inactive and discrepancies in the degree of antibacterial activity. In turn, we aim to synthesize C9 pestalone analogs incapable of undergoing the inactivating intramolecular cyclization by replacing the aldehyde with a range of electronic and steric functional groups. To date, eleven analogs were synthesized using a two-step synthesis involving first a Grignard addition of bromobenzene to a substituted phthalic anhydride (30-99% yield), and then modifying the produced carboxylic acid through esterification (47-76% yield) or amidation (7-50% yield). These analogs were then subjected to a broth microdilution minimum inhibitory concentration assay against Staphylococcus aureus, and it was found that only the analogs with the carboxylic acid showed activity. Continuing efforts are being made to access more analogs by synthesizing other substituted phthalic anhydrides.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 9:10am - 9:30am
123 Zeis Hall

9:20am

Earth as Canvas: Immortalizing Family Narratives in Clay
Losing oneself in a story is a cathartic experience: listening, reading, watching, and telling are all forms of release and connection. However, the viewer conventionally experiences narratives once-removed, as images on a screen, as words or drawings on flat pieces of paper. The viewer and the story do not exist on the same plane. A notable exception to this two-dimensional tendency is the rich history of using clay as a canvas upon which to paint stories and myths. When integrated with a three-dimensional form, a story can exist in the same physical environment as the viewer, and the distances between viewer, storyteller, and story become less divisive. By challenging the tradition of preserving stories in two dimensions, the experience of narrative can become more intimate, more immersive, more interactive. Clay’s seemingly paradoxical qualities of permanence and transmutability can more tactilely and permanently capture the evolution of a family’s memories, stories, and language in interactive, three-dimensional ceramic objects. While wet, clay is malleable and changes over time as it is shaped, just as memories and stories change each time they are recalled or retold; after firing, ceramics become intimate, daily-use objects that can withstand the test of time, so that family stories can live on within the objects generations after the original storyteller has passed. The drawing style developed for this body of work is a contemporary remix of historical styles of drawing on ceramics, influenced by modern animation and illustration aesthetics; this style serves to provide space in the contemporary world for two precious traditions that modern values have labeled outmoded: ceramics and the stories of older generations. In Earth as Canvas: Immortalizing Family Narratives in Clay, family stories are preserved in and on ceramic vessels. Most of the pieces are functional, or suggest functionality, to encourage daily use and intimacy between the piece and the user. Ideally, each time an object that embodies a story is used, the user will recall both the story and their memory or imagined persona of the storyteller, fostering intergenerational connections and an art-as-object, object-as-art appreciation.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 9:20am - 9:40am
237 Owen Hall

9:20am

Cloning Of Vomeronasal Type-2 Receptor For Deorphanization
The vomeronasal organ (VNO) is a chemosensory organ present in amphibians, reptiles, and non-primate mammals. In mice, vomeronasal neurons express vomeronasal-1 receptors (V1R) or vomeronasal-2 receptors (V2R), both of which are G protein-coupled receptors involved in pheromone detection. V2Rs are expressed by the basal neurons of the VNO. They are of special interest because they are used to detect protein pheromones, the Major Urinary Proteins (MUPs), which induce intermale aggression, female responsiveness to mating, and territory marking behaviors. Because V2Rs use combinatorial coding instead of a labelled line coding strategy, linking pheromone responses to the correct V2R has so far been difficult. We designed primers for each V2R to amplify separate individual sequences from a cDNA library, which could then be transfected into cells using vectors. This cell culture method would allow for deorphanization of V2Rs by creating entire cell populations which only express a single V2R. With V2Rs deorphanized, mapping of pathways can begin from a bottom-up method, instead of the more difficult top-down approach. Here we show how to isolate and clone V2Rs for individual eventual expression in mammalian cells using DNA purification, Zero Blunt TOPO cloning PCR kit and ligation into mammalian vector. V2R 121 was successfully cloned into a bacterial vector with a complete sequence. The blunt end cloning did result in correct directionality when the V2R was transferred into a mammalian vector. These results demonstrate progress towards setting up a cell culture based V2Rs expression system. This system will allow for further research to deorphanize individual V2Rs by matching them to their corresponding ligands. Stimulation of V2Rs reproducibly activate specific neural circuits in mouse brains, allowing for reliable study of how external environmental cues can direct behaviors. Cloning V2Rs is the first step to identify receptor-ligand interactions, which can be utilized for future research.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 9:20am - 9:40am
014 Zeis Hall

9:20am

LongView (Set Theory Exclusion to Produce a Path from Orientation to Graduation)
The UNC Asheville degree audit and advising tool, GradPlan, is helpful in planing classes on a semester by semester basis. However it does not provide tools to facilitate multi-semester plans towards graduate. Students must gather additional information required to make informed decisions from sources external to GradPlan. This information must be used with GradPlan rather by GradPlan. The application, LongView, consolidates GradPlan's program requirements, course information, grade information with the additional information of students' interest, historical workload, and the frequency of class offerings. In this presentation we demonstrate how the usage of LongView facilitate student exploration of the possible paths toward graduation arising from various options and choices. We also present our design that applies the set theory of exclusion upon the requirements a student must fulfill from year one to graduation and our implementation that represents and stores requirements and their relationships in a relational database.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 9:20am - 9:40am
125 Rhoades Robinson Hall

9:20am

Superheroes, Sales, And Piracy: A Multiple Regression Analysis Of Piracy’s Affect On Comic Book Sales
For years industry leaders and politicians debated over the impacts of copyright piracy, which is the unauthorized use and\or reproduction of copyrighted materials. Previous findings in media markets in reference to these impacts have been ambiguous. Some have found empirical evidence that piracy leads to a loss in sales, while some have found empirical evidence that piracy websites have no effect or a negative effect on sales. We should however not be surprised by these latter findings as there is some ambiguity in theoretical research regarding this topic. Some theoretical research proposes that piracy has a substation effect on sales, while other theoretical research proposes that illegal piracy has a sampling effect on sales which overpower the substation effect. This paper is the first to analyze the effects of piracy on the comic book industry, which was a $1.03 billion industry in the United States and Canada in 2016. This work is based on theoretical models developed in other media markets including film, TV, and music. Our empirical models used are based on both the theoretical model and conversations with a comic book store owner in the Asheville, North Carolina. Our multivariate regression analyses test the relationship between online piracy and the physical sales of comics in four ways: against well-known publishers, relatively-known publishers, lesser-known publishers, and all three types of publishers together to see if there is a significant relationship.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 9:20am - 9:40am
035 Karpen Hall

9:20am

Alienation And The Grotesque In Sylvia Plath’s Ariel Poems
In 1965, two years after Sylvia Plath’s suicide, many of Plath’s last poems were published in a poetry collection called Ariel. Early critical responses, and even some today, focus on the biographical relation between Plath’s mental illness and her work—reading her poetry through the lens of confessional poetry. However, I will focus solely on analysis of the literary craft and function of her poems, without influence on biographical context. I will argue that a major theme in this poetry collection is alienation, which is brought to life through utilization of grotesque images. Alienation has various causes, depending on each of the speakers’ situations. Fear of death or disconnect from a particular “role” imposed upon by societal expectations are a few reasons behind feelings of alienation. Plath’s speakers use grotesque language as a dialect of alienated individuals. To the readers, the grotesque images tend to provoke shock and threaten their comfort zones—in a way, showing the readers how alienation feels. Plath’s utilization of grotesque language is a way in which the speakers can communicate the nature of alienation, its functions, and its aesthetic and philosophical implications and complexities.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 9:20am - 9:40am
232 Karpen Hall

9:20am

An In-Depth Look of Upcycling at a Small Liberal Arts College
This study is an exploration of the current perception of upcycling among college students at a small liberal arts university. Upcycling is a modern twist to reusing items that occurs when creative consumers repurpose waste, giving it a new role and higher value. Upcycling has become a popular trend in fashion, home and garden, art and science. Its popularity has grown in part because of both local and national media attention, and has been highlighted on popular television shows and in national publications such as The Telegraph. For this pilot study, mass communication students participated in a survey about upcycling to establish a baseline on knowledge and perceptions of the trend. This study broadens the literature on upcycling and its implications on younger generations.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 9:20am - 9:40am
316 Karpen Hall

9:20am

Tobacco And Alcohol Marketing To Youth In Yancey, Avery, And Mitchell Counties, NC
Underage drinking and tobacco use are prevalent in the United States. This is an issue because of the marketing techniques used to entice underage youth to want to try alcohol and tobacco before they are of legal purchasing age. Some policies to restrict large corporations from marketing exist, but stores have latitude. The goal of this study was to assess stores in the Yancey, Mitchell and Avery County. This study includes 27 items generated by CounterTools to focus on the marketing techniques in stores. Some of these items include alcohol or tobacco products within 12 in of children items, are any of these items 3 feet of the floor, which product has the most stock, as well as what is the least price of these items. These items were given to a group of 4 students. The 4 students were given 60 stores to collect data from. The students will then take the collected data and enter the data into graphs to determine frequencies for each of the item in question. Students will present the findings to the Board of Health to show why it is pertinent to raise the legal purchase age of tobacco to 21 and to make sure all stores are following the marketing guidelines of these products so the youth are not wanting to start these habits.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 9:20am - 9:40am
406 Sherrill Center

9:20am

The Faces Of The Fletcher Feed And Seed: A Small Town Gathering For Traditional Music And Community
The Feed and Seed is a historical building in the town of Fletcher North Carolina. In the past 20 years, it has been renovated into a bluegrass hall where shows are held on the weekends. It is a prominent gathering space for locals and is commonly filled to the brim with patrons listening to traveling and nearby bluegrass groups. This is also a location where Sunday morning Christian services are held with traditional sermons and bluegrass influenced gospel music. The goal of this film is to capture the unique environment of the Feed and Seed and the sense of community created by the people that gather there.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 9:20am - 9:40am
012 Karpen Hall

9:20am

Les Jeunes et l'identité Québécoise
epuis le début de La Révolution Tranquille, La province de Québec a vécu une période d’événements politiques qui ont activement cherché une réponse à la question suivante; quelle est l’identité québécoise? Cet enjeu a toujours été au coeur du débat politique et il s’est exprimé plusieurs fois de façon concrète à travers de référendums visés à obtenir l'indépendance de la province francophone du Canada. Depuis le fameux référendum en 1995, où le vote souverainiste a perdu de seulement 1,16%, le mouvement indépendantiste a été considérablement affaibli. Ce phénomène récent est particulièrement visible chez les personnes qui ont entre 18-35 ans. Ainsi, l'objectif de mon recherche est de cibler cette démographique exacte pour découvrir quels sont les principaux facteurs qui ont contribué à la perte d'enthousiasme des jeunes québécois envers la perspective d’un Québec indépendant. Les données actuelles de sources réputées indiquent que cet évolution rapide de l’opinion politique des jeunes québécois ne peut pas être liée à une seule cause. Par conséquent, J’ai créé mon propre “étude pilote” pour faire une analyse comparative entre mes résultats et ceux d’enquêtes précédentes. L’objectif du sondage que j’ai créé et distribué à un certain nombres des québécois entre 18-35 ans mesure certaines tendances politiques des jeunes québécois dèjá observées tout en visant de poser d’autres questions qui capturent le dynamisme et la complexité de la problématique identitaire des jeunes au Québec.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 9:20am - 9:40am
012 Whiteside Hall

9:20am

It Gets Blurrier: Redefining Queer Success Through The "It Gets Better" Project
In September 2010, Dan Savage and his partner Terry Miller uploaded a video to Youtube, prompted by a perceived increase in the suicide rate among queer youth. With the hope of explaining to struggling (and perhaps suicidal) teens that "it gets better", this video started a trend that later became a large-scale social movement for queer youth, dubbed the "It Gets Better" (IGB) Project. This article investigates the 20 most viewed videos made for IGB, focusing specifically on how the videos, while encouraging hope and perseverance, ultimately reproduce a neoliberal definition of success and reinforce homornormativity. Although these IGB videos were recorded with the best intentions in mind, they also reinforce other narratives consistent with consumerism and neoliberal values. A content analysis of these IGB videos will be used to discuss the project's overall message and the themes that frequently emerge from within the project's dominant narratives. Results imply that these videos encourage neoliberal ideology, identify suicide as a personal failure, and encourage homonormativity.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 9:20am - 9:40am
236 Zageir Hall

9:20am

Statistical Analysis On The Gender Composition Of Mixed Ultimate
The sport of Ultimate is unique in that it has a coed division, commonly known as the mixed division. According to the current rule of play as outlined by USA Ultimate, each team may have a maximum of seven players on the field. In the mixed division, teams follow a prescribed gender ratio which is determined at the beginning of each point. Teams may either choose to play 4 men and 3 women (hereby referred to as 4:3) or 3 men and 4 women (hereby referred to as 3:4). Furthermore, each team has a maximum roster limit of 27 total players. There are no current limitations on how many of each gender are permitted per roster. Because there are significantly more male players than female players, 4:3 is most often accepted as the default gender ratio and teams tend to roster more male players than female. This study aims to analyze the gender composition of select teams’ rosters, any variation between male and female subgroups of in-game statistics, and any correlation between gender and win percentage.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 9:20am - Wednesday April 24, 2019 9:40am
212 Rhoades Robinson Hall

9:30am

Computational Studies Of Oxidation And Reduction Of Copper Sulfonamides
Strongly chelating ligands such as sulfonamides are important in separation of metals, particularly in isolating trace elements. Further understanding of the nature of sulfonamide bonding could lead to a strong extraction agent for specific metals found in natural mineral deposits. It was determined experimentally that copper(II) coordinated to two sulfonamide ligands, Cu(sulf)2, had unusual geometrtic and potentiometric properties, being particularly stable with respect to multiple oxidations and reductions. Starting from the single-crystal X-ray generated geometry of Cu(sulf)2, a series of oxidized and reduced forms are studied using Density Functional Theory (DFT) and the Quantum Theory of Atoms In Molecules (ATAIM), in order to determine likely oxidation and reduction sites, and the nature of bonding of the ligand.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 9:30am - 9:50am
123 Zeis Hall

9:30am

Dihydropyrrole Synthesis From Novel Chalcones Via 6π Electrocyclizations
Numerous 6π conjugated systems were observed during an electrocyclization-condensation reaction in order to understand the way freely resonating electrons behave in π-orbitals in the presence of withdrawing and donating substituents. We predict that when the 6π carbanion system contains with a withdrawing or deactivating residue, the density of the π-electrons will be delocalized, causing the π-electrons to be more organized and stabilizing the system. Under the notion that electrocyclic systems are thermodynamic, the stabilization of the carbanion system will decrease the reaction entropy, as well as hindering product formation, thus resulting in a decrease in yield under a specific time frame. In turn, We predict that donating or activating residues will contribute to a less stable, more electron dense and more entropic intermediate and these cause product formation to occur in relatively higher yields than the former case described. The electrocyclic-condensation of glycine-ethyl ester hydrochloride and chalcone derivatives with varying electronic substituents is the reaction of interest. In the reaction, the chalcone and glycine- ethyl ester will condense to form a secondary imine intermediate. In the same pot, this intermediate will undergo an electrocyclization in order to form a dihydro-pyrrole. Several novel alpha-substituted chalcones were synthesized in good to excellent yield using a variety of methods, some novel. It was found that the dihydropyrrole formed was dictated by the alpha-substituent.General alpha hydrogen chalcones formed C-N pi bonded dihydropyrroles, whereas other alpha-substituted chalcones generated N-H dihydropyrroles other dihydropyrroles are being developed and the results will be reported.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 9:30am - 9:50am
202 Zeis Hall

9:40am

They/Them: A Sculptural Exploration of Gender Fluidity
Human identity is complex, multifaceted, and intangible. Human beings have both internalized and externalized parts of themselves that are a challenge to wholly represent in visual art. The Social Identity Theory, developed in 1979, suggests that each person has not one “personal self,” but rather multiple levels of the self that surface or disappear based on social context. These levels are influenced by both nature and nurture, and can only be discovered and determined by the individual to whom they belong. Gender, being one level of the self, is more complex and fluid than most people realize. This paper and its corresponding body of work explore internal and external struggles the artist has experienced surrounding gender identity, while opening the conversation about gender nonconformity, and providing solidarity and relatable content to those experiencing similar identity struggles. This body of work is influenced by Jenny Holzer’s feminist text-based sculptures, Yayoi Kusama’s mental illness and fear-reflecting works, and Vaginal Davis’ mixed media pieces on gender identity.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 9:40am - 10:00am
237 Owen Hall

9:40am

Developing a Model System to Establish Electrophysiological Protocols Necessary for the Deorphanization of Vomeronasal Sensory Receptors (VNSRs)
Chemical signaling mediates many complex behavioral interactions such as mating and the establishment of hierarchy for a variety of animal species. A key form of chemical signaling in rodents is facilitated by the production and detection of intraspecific pheromones known as major urinary proteins (MUPs). Pheromones such as MUPs convey specific information which is innately recognized by members of a species. In rodents, MUPs are detected by receptors on specialized sensory neurons in the vomeronasal organ (VNO) known as vomeronasal sensory receptors (VNSRs). Once a MUP binds to a VNSR, the sensory neuron initiates neural circuits extending to other sections of the brain such as the amygdala and surrounding limbic structures leading to a behavioral response. Sensory neurons expressing different VNSRs will activate different neural circuits, thus allowing different MUPs to evoke specific behaviors. The exact behavioral response to a certain MUP is predictable for all members of the species and indicates common neural circuitry associated with MUP communication. This uniformity of neural circuitry in mice allows for MUP communication to serve as a reliable model system for studying how chemical stimuli code for behavioral outputs. This study aims to determine which MUPs activate a given VNSR in order to elucidate the neural circuits responsible for specific behavioral reactions. To achieve this understanding, patch clamp analysis will be used to deorphanize VNSRs by monitoring electrophysiological changes in cells expressing VNSRs upon exposure to specific MUPs. If the MUP being introduced is able to bind the specific VNSRs expressed by the cells, a measurable change in the cells voltage will occur. Currently, a model system using CHO cells transfected to express kir2.2 channels is being established to yield preliminary methodologies that will be used to complete this study.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 9:40am - 10:00am
014 Zeis Hall

9:40am

Help Me Thrive
In our fast-paced world, we are constantly pulled in many directions and given many chores to manage. One of those unending chores is maintaining the home. In this presentation we will introduce “Help Me Thrive!”, a web-application that assigns, tracks, and rewards each family member for completing assigned chores. “Help Me Thrive!” obtains the necessary information through a questionnaire that gathers information such as the number of family members, rooms, and optional chores categories. This information is then processed and stored in a MySQL database using PHP. One significant part of the assignment process is the decision tree for age appropriate chores for the children. The process decides the time frame for the chores, either on a daily, weekly, monthly, yearly, or seasonal basis. Once the chores are individually designed, then a review will be shown where the “Head of Household” can adjust the chores such as reassign, add or delete. Lastly there will be a reward side to the web-application in either the form of money earned, or points earned. The chores will be saved for the following time frames: daily chores for 90 days, weekly for one year, annual, five years, and seasonal five years. Our test families have tested the program and found that the web-application has allowed them to maintain a better, cleaner household. Also, the children are more responsive to doing their chores with the rewards system. This has allowed a more peaceful home environment.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 9:40am - 10:00am
125 Rhoades Robinson Hall

9:40am

Fixed Revenue Streams, Marginal Revenue Product, and Bargaining Power: An Econometric Analysis of NBA Players’ Salaries
In this study, I attempt to replicate the work of sports economists David Berri, Michael Leeds, and Peter von Allmen, using their two-step model to examine the determinants of NBA players’ salaries in the presence of fixed revenue streams. Prior to Berri et al.’s study, an athlete’s salary was compared to an estimate of their marginal revenue product (MRP). However, as Berri et al. point out, professional sports leagues have large fixed revenue streams that can be unrelated to the performance of current players, complicating the comparison of a player’s MRP to their salary. The two-step model proposed by Berri et al. instead posits that players are compensated for their labor’s addition to variable revenue (i.e. their MRP) as well as paid a portion of fixed revenue (i.e. league-wide shared national television contracts) over which they must bargain for with the team that is offering the contract. Through quantile and fixed effects regression analysis, Berri et al.’s paper explores how different factors such as player characteristics, team characteristics, the size of fixed revenue streams, and a player’s agent impact a player’s bargaining power. In my paper, I replicate this process to discover whether Berri et al.’s findings hold when applied to a different dataset. With the increased concern within the academic community over p-hacking and the replicability of results, studies such as this one offer an important contribution to the literature.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 9:40am - 10:00am
035 Karpen Hall

9:40am

Fantasies Of The Psyche: The Schizophrenic Reality Of Dr. Thompson And The 1972 Presidential Campaign
Humanitarian instinct and caustic vitriol—armed language in an armed world—war abroad and delusions of peace at home. In 1971 the political entities for Hunter S. Thompson expressed the cosmic duality in the individual, the national character, and of the conscience of voters. His coverage of the 1972 Presidential Election Campaign was the least professional and most accurate portrayal of that particular political vortex. Examining the transformations of society into beasts Thompson looks at individual behavior with a primordial imagination. His irrepressible confrontations with fear illuminate insights about governing powers, and for the masses who imbibe them. As the central character in his own story Thompson relates with excessive fantasy and detail American culture in the infancy of the 1970’s. Both Democratic and Republican nominees are vying for peace, but what shadows lie between that idea and the reality? For whom does the bell toll? Thompson’s irrepressible satire explores vice and virtue by projecting the jester, clown, and trickster persona into his non-fictive narrative. The self-stigmatized patriot writes to shock, and readers recognize the fallacies in Washington and media outlets through Thompson’s inveterate and empathic sense for experience. Always writing from the place of instinct Thompson naturally weaves primitive thought and contemporaneity into episodic adventures spanning the course of the Democratic primaries. My treatment of Thompson’s story explores his literary form through a comparative approach, and as a way to structure the vastly strange details of his writing mind. Psychotic and grotesque, mirroring the carnival of American life, but always driven by an insatiable concern for polity Thompson delivers a seminal work on life, liberty, and the savage pursuit of happiness.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 9:40am - 10:00am
232 Karpen Hall

9:40am

Environmental Honesty In The “Green” Advertisements Of Fortune 500 Companies
This study explores the notion of green-washing in the advertisements of five Fortune 500 companies and whether these advertisements are truthfully transparent of the companies’ environmental impact. Corporations and energy industries throughout the years have often utilized ""greenwashing"", or the use of marketing to portray an organization's products, activities or policies as environmentally friendly (in-text citation needed). To gain insight into the topic, this paper analyzes ""greenwashing"" marketing strategies used in 2017 advertising campaigns from five of the top ten Fortune 500 companies – Walmart, Apple, Exxon Mobil, General Motors and AT&T. This study then examines the companies’ environmental impact reports to better understand the transparency between the advertisements and the reported environmental data of these companies.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 9:40am - 10:00am
316 Karpen Hall

9:40am

Drying Out: An examination of Prohibition on Native American lands.
Despite various efforts, the Native American community is severely affected by substance abuse. Research suggests that one in ten Native American deaths are alcohol related, indicating the need for interventions. Interventions have usually included laws or policies put in place by the Federal Government limiting alcohol sales on Native American reservations. Since most of these laws have been changed with time, tribes now have the power to enforce their own laws on alcohol sales. Although this has made many Native communities give up on their efforts of prohibition, some Native Tribes are still hesitant to allow alcohol to be sold within the community. Employing a literature review on substance abuse control within Native communities, this study examines the health implications of prohibition on Native American populations, particularly in Cherokee, NC. The findings of the research suggest mixed results.Overall, communities that did not allow the sell of alcohol appeared to have fewer alcohol-related incidents. The negative implications included an increase in crime related to alcohol and the income lost to the neighboring communities that take advantage of the prohibition. Although some positive benefits have come out of prohibition in Native lands, it is clear that it would be more beneficial of Native American communities to avoid prohibition and progress in other methods of substance abuse care. Approaches, including policies that align with the culture and that are more natural, such as medical marijuana, should be considered.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 9:40am - 10:00am
406 Sherrill Center

9:40am

Late Bloomer
Ah - middle school. Three years of Axe body spray, sagging pants and pre-algebra. Everything feels like the end of the world. There are a lot of emotions that come with being a pre-teen and those emotions all come to a head at the middle school dance. What happens when you put a bunch of sweaty, hormonal kids in a room together for two and a half hours? Absolute chaos. It seems like nobody has fond memories of this time and even if they do exist, people are hesitant to talk about them. Why are we like this? What happened? Does middle school really have that much of an impact on a person's life? This documentary hopes to reexamine this time period, its ups and downs, and maybe allow us to laugh at ourselves a little bit. We conducted interviews with college students as well as current middle schoolers about their experiences, which were then reenacted for the camera.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 9:40am - 10:00am
012 Karpen Hall

9:40am

Les Avis Contemporains Sur Le Langage Inclusif En France Et À Québec
Au cours des trois derniers mois, j’assistais un groupe de recherche universitaire à administrer un sondage linguistique au sujet du langage inclusif en France et à Québec. Dans ce sondage, nous avons demandé plusieurs universités à partager notre sondage aux étudiants et aux membres de la faculté pour réunir leurs réponses aux questions à propos des aspects différents du langage inclusif et du genre neutre. Nous avons amassé dizaines de réponses des participants de milieux différents. Chacun des sondés avait son propre avis et de l’information que nous avons collecté, nous espérions trouver des tendances d’importance linguistique. Nous étudiions les résultats de plusieurs angles pour mieux comprendre les avis contemporains sur le langage inclusif dans les deux pays précités.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 9:40am - 10:00am
012 Whiteside Hall

9:40am

Vetting Exopla+M182+B182:C182+B+B182:I182
We report follow-up observations of seven Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs) from the remote controlled 0.61-m telescope at the Sierra Stars Observatory in California. We alternated between broadband photometric lters (NI-R-V-B) to measure transit events of KOIs it two distinct colors. We could then compare light curves (LCs) between lters in order to test for astrophysical false positive scenarios. Due to limitations directly resulting from the small aperture of the Sierra Stars Observatory telescope (SSOT) and magnitude of Kepler stars (between V15 and V18), LCs had a large root-mean-square (rms) scatter. In consequence, claims about the disposition of all seven KOIs lack statistical certainty in this study. However, change-point analysis (CPA) has proven to be an effective tool when parameterizing LCs. This technique has not been used before in exoplanetary transit LCs, and is worth comparing to other methods.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 9:40am - 10:00am
212 Rhoades Robinson Hall

9:40am

La Operación.
The transition of imperial power to the United States in Puerto Rico transformed sociocultural definitions and ideals of gender, race and family structure. In an effort to implement a model democracy, the United States emphasized the institution of capitalism in which women were expected to be involved in the workforce. The shift of women's labor from the home to a structured work environment was accompanied by a new standard of a nuclear family structure. Women were allocated the responsibility to limit their fertility, and the state further enforced this with a narrative of population control as being beneficial to the well being of families and the economic well being of Puerto Rico. In this framework, imperial values of whiteness and class were implied as markers of responsible motherhood and henceforth womanhood. Sterilization was introduced as a method for population control in the 1930s and gained popularity throughout the twentieth century. To examine the effects of this form of imperialism, this research explores trends of fertility and sterilization rates relative to class and race using secondary analysis of census data and studies on sterilization conducted by state officials, economists and social scientists in various fields. The findings of the research demonstrates the ways in which imperial sociocultural values of race and class impacted the fertility and sterilization rates of demographic groups during the twentieth century.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 9:40am - 10:00am
236 Zageir Hall

9:50am

Mobile Low Resource Qualitative And Quantitative Laboratory Experimental Methods
There is a need for mobile-styled, low resource laboratory experimental methods, which do not require the use of expensive chemicals, volumetric glassware, and precise instrumentation, as well as running water and constant electricity. The purpose of this project is to create mobile styled, low resource, qualitative and quantitative laboratory experimental methods. The goal of the project is to apply these experimental methods in rural institutions, specifically in Ghana. A Wikipedia article related to Ethnochemistry is in progress.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 9:50am - 10:10am
202 Zeis Hall

10:00am

Musical Experimentalism at UNC Asheville, Copernican Music with Black Mountain College Legacy Fellow, Jonathan Keats
At Black Mountain College in 1952, John Cage staged his first multimedia happening based on chance. Fifty-nine years later, conceptual artist and experimental philosopher Jonathon Keats began a different set of experiments with randomization in art and musical composition. On the surface, the motivations were unrelated. For Cage, chance was a manifestation of I Ching, an undertaking he described as "imitating nature in its manner of operation". Keats, on the other hand, was attempting to foment a Copernican revolution in the arts, which he believed was still Ptolemaic five centuries after Copernicus. One element of his Copernican revolution entailed decomposing music to have the entropy of the universe, initially by randomizing Bach's Well-Tempered Clavier. For all their many differences, there are deep connections between Keats’s project and Cage's in terms of the imitation of nature. In this course inspired by Cage's work at Black Mountain College, Keats has worked closely with UNC Asheville students to take this imitation further. Using resources available in UNCA's STEAM and Bob Moog Studios, students in this class created instruments for a Copernican orchestra at UNCA, for which truly Copernican music has been composed by UNCA students.



Tuesday April 24, 2018 10:00am - 11:30am
018 Lipinski Hall

10:00am

Body Perceptions And Ideas
The purpose of this study is to investigate the attitudes people have about weight and their bodies. Participants were given an online survey covering various attitudes related to their weight, such as self-perceived weight, body consciousness, and changeability of body weight. We will be testing the research hypothesis that people who perceive themselves as having a healthy weight will consider weight more controllable than those that do not, regardless of whether or not they fall within a healthy range for body weight.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 10:00am - 11:30am
Sherrill Center Concourse

10:00am

Does Party Trump Principal? The Role Of Partisanship As A Social Identity In Dictating Voting Behavior
Since the 2016 presidential election, social psychologists as well as the general public have expressed renewed interest in the influence of partisan identification on voting behavior. More specifically, does partisan identity exert a greater influence on voting behavior than substantive policy positions? We investigated this question by presenting subjects with one of two fake newspaper articles depicting Democratic and Republican candidates competing in an election for local political office. In the control condition, candidates held policy stances in line with their respective party platform. In the experimental condition, candidate’s policy positions diverged from the party line. Subjects were then asked to choose which candidate they would vote for if this election were to be taking place in their municipality of residence. After being questioned as to vote choice, subjects completed a measure of social group identity in reference to their political party. We hypothesize that when candidates diverge from the party line on issues of moderate saliency, voters who view their political party as a social identity will be more likely to vote according to their partisan identification rather than candidate’s policy stance. Subjects were recruited from the UNC Asheville community and via Amazon Mechanical Turk. Statistical results will be presented and discussed in light of relevant theory.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 10:00am - 11:30am
Sherrill Center Concourse

10:00am

Pejorative Terms: Meanings And Assumptions
Research has found that pejorative terms (words used to express contempt or disapproval) can have gender connotations (Jay & Jay, 2013). These connotations seem to highlight gender stereotypes consistent with the expression of ambivalent sexism. Because of these connotations, it is possible that popular pejorative language could serve to influence and maintain traditional gender roles and/or strengthen sexist assumptions. However, derogatory language, including the words, definitions and frequency of use, has been found to change over time (Jay & Jay, 2013).The current study seeks to update our understanding of how pejorative terminology is presently used; the words associations with the assumed gender of the target of each expression, the assumed user of each term, as well as the current definition of each word. We will also investigate assumed power and demeaning quality of specific words. We expect that certain terms will have stronger gender connotations than others. The results of this research will be used to inform future studies where we will investigate the effect of exposure to gendered pejorative terms on stereotypical assumptions made about the target of the term, and how these assumptions may be related to ambivalently sexist beliefs.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 10:00am - 11:30am
Sherrill Center Concourse

10:00am

Public Perceptions of Substance Abuse
Substance abuse, which is the misuse or overuse of a substance, often has many negative consequences to one’s health. In addition to this, people experiencing substance abuse may perceive that they are being stigmatized by society. This perceived stigma, resulting from the discriminatory or negative words, actions, and beliefs of others, may have serious deleterious effects on an individual (Ahern et al., 2007; Birtel et al., 2017; Can et al., 2015, Luoma et al., 2007). This internalized and perceived stigma felt by those experiencing substance abuse may stem from the societal perception of this population. This study seeks to investigate the public perception of individuals who experience substance abuse.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 10:00am - 11:30am
Sherrill Center Concourse

10:00am

The Cumulative Effects Of Adverse Childhood Experiences And Adult Sexual Assault On Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptomology
In recent years, there has been an increased public interest in the issue of sexual assault due to the growing number of women who are speaking out about the traumas that they have suffered (Zacharek, Dockterman, & Sweetland Edwards, 2018). The rise of this issue in the public domain has coincided with an increase in research conducted related to the negative outcomes associated with exposure to sexual assault, such as Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), which can in some cases cause severe psychological impairment (Messman-Moore, Long, & Siegfried, 2000). Another line of research that is also related to similar negative psychological outcomes is the study of Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) (Felitti et al., 1998). The original ACEs study by Felitti et al. (1998), indicated that there is a connection between the experience of trauma during childhood and lasting negative physical and psychological health outcomes such as depressed mood, suicide attempts, an increase in drug in alcohol use, and a history of sexually transmitted diseases. As a result, individuals who have experienced both childhood trauma and adult sexual assault (ASA) may be at greater risk of experiencing negative health outcomes following an experience of ASA. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between ACEs, ASA, and the experience of PTSD symptoms. Data on these subjects will be collected by administering a general demographics form, the ACEs questionnaire, a modified version of the Campus Climate Survey on Sexual Assault and Sexual Misconduct questionnaire, and the PTSD Checklist- Civilian Version through an online survey platform to an adult population. The findings of this study may be used to strengthen the connection between the negative outcomes associated with the experience of ACEs and those associated with ASA such as PTSD.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 10:00am - 11:30am
Sherrill Center Concourse

10:00am

The Relationship Between Adverse Childhood Behavior Experiences And Self Injurious Behavior
Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) have been linked to a number of negative outcomes in adulthood. The purpose of this study is to explore the link between adverse childhood experiences and the prevalence of self injurious behavior in adolescence and young adulthood. General findings consisted of those who had attempted self-harm were more likely to engage in self-harm in the near future. Though there wasn’t an overwhelming amount of sources for this subject, it is able to serve as background information for this study. One of the more popular data points that was concluded from research was the idea of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) often lead to results such as self-harm.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 10:00am - 11:30am
Sherrill Center Concourse

10:00am

10:00am

Psychology of Women (Psychology 334)
All presenters in this poster session conducted original empirical studies in the psychology of women discipline. Adopting either content analysis or survey methodology, student researchers worked in pairs to conduct investigations on a range of issues related to women or gender. Content analysis projects, which involved systematic evaluations of film or television representations, examined portrayals of African-American female characters, leadership styles of female “bosses,” characters with lesbian and gay identities, and the sexualization of girls. Four survey study projects assessed differences in perceptions of male and female respondents in varying contexts: judgments about the severity of crimes when committed by males vs. females, beliefs about the seriousness of pain complaints in male vs. female patients, attitudes toward alcohol and intoxication in male vs. female drinkers, and views of mindfulness. Additional survey studies evaluated male and female students’ perceptions of faculty, male and female experiences of cyberbulling, beliefs about the gender wage gap, and the relationship between spirituality and feminism. All 12 posters will contain summaries of investigators’ questions, methods, findings, and conclusions, considering implications of the research for larger disciplinary and societal issues



Tuesday April 24, 2018 10:00am - 11:30am
Sherrill Center Concourse

10:00am

What makes humans so special? Exploring human intelligence and behavior in Psyc/Neur 362 - Advanced Neuroscience
This poster session features projects exploring the evolutionary and neurological factors contributing to the unique mental and behavioral abilities of homo sapiens.  Specific topics include:  the evolutionary advantages, and mental health disadvantages, of extended development and neuroplasticity; structural and genetic factors contributing to intelligence and emotional processing (e.g., the anterior cingulate cortex; FOXP2 and SRGAP2 genes); and potentially special phenomena arising from human cognition (e.g., music, political organization and partisanship).



Tuesday April 24, 2018 10:00am - 11:30am
Sherrill Center Concourse

10:15am

Historically Apathetic: Using Art Making As A Means Of Coping With Reality
The Symbolism Movement of Art and Literature began in the 19th century and aimed to express personal emotions or ideas rather than reproducing images of the natural world. Artists often created fictional fantasy worlds to facilitate the language necessary to communicate those ideas. Different among these artists was Edvard Munch, who is often referred to as a Symbolic Naturalist painter, drawing on his fears and anxieties of modern existence relating more so to the average passerby. Outside of the fine arts world are clinical therapy practices that seek to address these anxieties in order to ease them. Two such clinical therapies break away from traditional conversational therapy: art therapy and Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR). While art therapy involves the patient’s hands-on participation in expressing their traumas and worries via visual conversation, EMDR simulates the processing powers of Rapid Eye Movement (REM) sleep, pulling the patient into a more dreamlike state of mind in order to better process traumas and fears. By incorporating the ideas of the Symbolism Movement and the partnership of addressing negative experiences with the positive experience of creating, can this body of work, in the process of creating authentic autobiographical works, bring the artist resolve and validate viewers’ shared experiences of anxiety and trauma?


Tuesday April 24, 2018 10:15am - 10:35am
237 Owen Hall

10:15am

Why Cloud Iridescence Mimics Birefringent Colors
Cloud iridescence is one commonly overlooked, yet spectacular atmospheric optical phenomenon, in which clouds become vividly multi-colored, like oil slicks in the sky. However, unlike an oil slick, which is the result of thin-film interference, the selection of colors in iridescent clouds are due to a different optical physical process called diffraction. Sunlight diffracts around thin cloud layers, interfering constructively and destructively at different locations for different wavelengths. This interference is seen as a range of colors that appear to follow the Michel-Levy Birefringence chart. Supported by observations of the polarization state (degree and angle of linear polarization) of iridescent clouds, this research suggests why cloud iridescence, a diffraction phenomenon, mimics the familiar color patterns of thin-film interference. The chromatic effects due to interference from both diffraction from cloud droplets and thin films are compared based on the points in time and space in which the phase of incident unpolarized light is altered as a function of wavelength. This comparison illustrates why chromatic patterns match those of the birefringence interference chart, regardless of the process by which different wavelengths shift phases.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 10:15am - 10:35am
213 Rhoades Robinson Hall

10:15am

Predation Rates On Ambystoma maculatum (Spotted Salamander) Polymorphic Egg Masses
A polymorphism results when a gene has multiple alleles, and polymorphic species can have many different forms. Ambystoma maculatum (spotted salamander) lays polymorphic egg masses that appear either clear or white. This study examined the effects of egg mass morph on predation rates in the natural environment to determine possible advantages of the polymorphism. It was hypothesized that clear egg masses would be predated upon more heavily because white masses have a survivorship advantage under predation. This study examined the relationship between egg mass volume and embryo number for masses of both morphs, surveyed natural predators in the field, and used volume as an indicator of predations rates. Twelve different taxa were surveyed as possible predators in the field, with Ambystoma opacum being most prevalent. Change in egg mass volume was not significant for either morph, but white masses experienced a relatively smaller change in volume than clear masses. The lack of significant difference in the change in volume suggests that morph does not significantly influence predation rates. It is expected that some other fitness advantage maintains the white morph rather than greater survivorship under predation.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 10:15am - 10:35am
014 Zeis Hall

10:15am

Trumping The Election: An Econometric Analysis Of District Level Data And The 2016 Election
Many view the 2016 U.S. Presidential election as an unconventional election cycle. The rise of Donald J. Trump from real estate mogul and reality television star, to President of the United States was unprecedented in modern politics. Though he did not win the popular vote, President Trump won nearly 80% of counties and the majority of congressional districts in the United States. This paper uses data derived from the U.S. Census Bureau, and various state election agencies to test, controlling for various socioeconomic variables, the effect of median income levels on how individual districts in a series of key swing states voted in this election. This paper uses a logit model to determine whether a district in these swing states voted republican or not. Research suggests that there is a small impact by income on voting outcome, though this can be complicated by a variety of other variables.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 10:15am - 10:35am
035 Karpen Hall

10:15am

Quadcopter Crash Prevention Restraint (Q-CPR
From package delivery to disaster relief to aerial photography, quadcopter applications have significantly expanded in recent years. The Joint Engineering Mechatronics Program is interested in developing quadcopter controls research opportunities at UNCA. Quadcopter testing, however, can be expensive and dangerous. Flying any quadcopter carries risks of crashing and damaging the quadcopter and its surroundings. Therefore, there is a need for a safe testing environment (test bed) that will confine the quadcopter, while still letting it rotate freely in all directions. The testing must produce the same results once the quadcopter is removed from the test bed and flown outside. The Quadcopter Crash Prevention Restraint (Q-CPR) project involved designing and fabricating a test bed for variety of small quadcopters used for research purposes. The Q-CPR allows rotation around each of the principal axes, known as the roll, pitch, and yaw directions. It also allows vertical motion. This device will allow the new research program to safely test control algorithms and expand educational options for engineering students.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 10:15am - 10:35am
103 Rhoades Robinson

10:15am

"The Fog Is Very Dense, Indeed:" Oppressive Forces In Charles Dickens's Bleak House
The Court of Chancery in Charles Dickens’ 1853 novel Bleak House is an omnipresent and malicious force whose presence is felt in every aspect of the novel. The literal fog that Dickens uses to represent its malignant influence is spread thickly over London throughout the novel, and the court’s methods of enforcing its status are varied and incredibly powerful. The characters in the novel all struggle against these forces that the court employs, to varying degrees of individual success, but no matter their personal victories or failures the court is left utterly untouched, its influence as powerful as ever. The court’s web of influence encompasses almost the whole world of the novel, and virtually all of the characters are tied to it in some way—and the court, throughout, uses the forces under its control to strictly enforce the class divisions that are required for its continued power. As the fog of the court spreads, however, the people oppressed by these forces are blinded to their true nature. I will address how these forces, in particular the Detective force, are cast as morally pure institutions whose purpose is to provide validation for the Court system, while also enforcing the strict class segregation that is required for the Court to retain its power.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 10:15am - 10:35am
232 Karpen Hall

10:15am

Fighting for Productive Tree Ordinances in the Metropolitan Areas of North Carolina Through Effective Communication Tactics
This study analyzes the research on the repercussions of inadequate tree ordinances in three metropolitan areas of North Carolina: Asheville, Charlotte and Raleigh. Along with the analysis of specific tree ordinances from each city, this paper utilizes the research on the sustainability and management of urban forestry in Asheville, North Carolina. Data have also been compiled from articles in the Asheville Citizen-Times, the Charlotte Observer and the Raleigh News & Observer. Urban forestry has a significant impact on the overall health of the planet as well as its citizens. This paper seeks to determine the most effective communication tactic for inciting action in residents within these urban communities, conceivably resulting in the creation of additional, more productive tree ordinances to preserve the urban environment

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 10:15am - 10:35am
316 Karpen Hall

10:15am

Best Practices for Reducing Physician Burnout
Despite quantitative and qualitative research revealing the high prevalence and serious consequences of physician burnout in the United States, little is known about the approaches for reducing or eliminating burnout. While burnout reduction programs are vital for providing support, services, and informations to physicians who are experiencing burnout, the effects of the programs are temporary and limited by participation. This study aims to explore the causes of burnout, program successes, and institutional changes through a narrative review of the literature. The methods of this study include a collection of literature from relevant public health database searches using keywords followed by an analysis of the recent and historical changes in medicine, and examination of the successes, failures, and limitations of burnout reduction programs and applied institutional change. Results of this study suggest burnout reduction programs are successful in short-term burnout reduction within physicians who attend, through training of mindfulness, coping strategies. These findings indicates establishing that institutional and policy change is necessary to ensure lasting burnout reduction and prevention. These findings may have implications for for-profit medical systems, insurance companies, and policy initiatives.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 10:15am - 10:35am
406 Sherrill Center

10:15am

Wir Sind Hier! (We Are Here!): The Impact Of 1940s And 1950s African American Media Representation On The Visibility Of The German “Brown Babies”
In the midst of the Allied occupation of Germany during and after World War II, the American and German governments both hid from the public a “racial problem.” This problem was the mixed race children of black GIs and white European women. These children were known as “brown babies” in the United States and as “Mischlingskinder” in Germany, a pejorative term meaning “mutt children.” The German government concluded that the solution to this “problem” was to encourage the mothers of these children to put them up for international adoption. The only news publications in the United States that addressed this adoption process were African American magazines such as Ebony, Hue, and Jet. Mainstream media in the United States at the time remained silent on the stories of Afro-German children and the possibility of transnational adoption. Through the analysis of articles from these publications, this paper serves to exemplify that from the late 1940s to the 1950s, African American newspapers addressed Afro-German adoption because they were human interest stories that depicted racial transgression. Ultimately, these publications both further encouraged transnational adoption of “brown babies” while also serving as a criticism of the racism and discrimination within both American and German culture that resulted in their experienced cultural displacement.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 10:15am - 10:35am
014 Whiteside Hall

10:15am

Pieces
A group of friends have been asked to come together and build a puzzle. The goal was to capture how a group of people, particularly friends, can work and interact with each other in a casual setting to accomplish a goal. We wanted to see who committed to the task and who didn't, or how some preferred to work by themselves while others needed support. In the end it was about capturing something very human and personal through the lens of something as mundane as building a puzzle.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 10:15am - 10:35am
012 Karpen Hall

10:15am

Does Identity Matter? The Effect Of Female Representation In The National Legislature On Violence Against Women
Why is violence against women treated more seriously by some countries than others? I answer this question by examining the relationship between the representation of women in the legislature and the criminalization, enforcement, and perceived societal safety concerning violence against women. Using data that I have collected based on the U.S. State Department’s 2016 human rights reports, I find that when controlling for factors such as regime type or economic development, having more women in the legislature increases the rates of criminalization of violence against women, but has no effect on the enforcement of laws or the general safety of women from violence. I discuss my findings and their implication for the incorporation of women in politics.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 10:15am - 10:35am
237 Zageir Hall

10:15am

The Transformative Power Of Worker-Owned Cooperatives
As their membership and political power continues to decline, labor unions are struggling to fight the growing issues of income inequality, precarious work, and economic insecurity. The current failure of unions to ignite progressive change for the working class has turned more attention toward the idea of worker-owned cooperatives, in which businesses are structured and ran democratically and collectively. Research since the emergence of the cooperative model has largely focused on the economic potential of worker owned businesses. However, there are still many questions as to how worker ownership can be expanded, and what benefits that will bring to labor reform. This study concerns the transformative power within worker-cooperatives in terms of what kinds of social change they can provide to contemporary labor movements, as well as the economic and political reforms that are necessary to ignite a larger cooperative movement. By examining case studies of a variety of cooperatives in North Carolina, as well as qualitative interviews with cooperative employees, this research will answer questions of how cooperatives empower workers, what organizational and formative challenges are presented for these firms, and how co-ops can be a force for broader progressive change. Preliminary findings suggest that cooperatives can be a positive force for remedying issues of income inequality and employment insecurity, while simultaneously changing our relationship with labor. Moreover the cooperative structure has the potential to create businesses that provide community and social services largely unseen within many conventional firms. Nevertheless, cooperatives still face specific disadvantages within the marketplace, requiring large scale economic and policy reforms.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 10:15am - 10:35am
236 Zageir Hall

10:15am

10:20am

Unimolecular Decomposition of CD3CD2CHFBr
Halogenated hydrocarbons are important due to their ability to destroy ozone and act as greenhouse gases. In order to investigate the degradation reaction pathways for halogenated compounds, a model molecule, CD3CD2CHFBr, was prepared using the chemical activation technique. The activated CD3CD2CHFBr was prepared by combination of CD3CD2 and CHFBr radicals prepared by photosensitizing CD3CD2I and CHFBr2, respectively using Hg(3P0). The unimolecular decomposition pathways for CD3CD2CHFBr are still being analyzed. However, it was found that the E/Z ratio for the products of the decomposition changes with pressure. This may be due to an E/Z isomer shift caused by secondary mercury photolysis. It was also found that the 1,2-DBr elimination reaction leads to the prevalent product formed at all pressures analyzed.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 10:20am - 10:40am
202 Zeis Hall

10:20am

Tippet: Outdoor Recreation Meets Technology
Tippet is a web application designed for fly anglers that allows them to access crucial information in one easy to use tool. With this application, users can easily find information such as tutorials about casting methods, gear requirements, knot-tying, entomology, and fly patterns. Fly anglers often study the hundreds of books, videos, and articles dedicated to fly fishing so that they can learn and be successful on the water. The primary challenge within this community is the need to bring this information together into a single source for all fly anglers, regardless of their skill level. Tippet’s aim is to consolidate these materials into a single application that anglers can access via multiple devices and platforms. In this presentation, the design and implementation of Tippet is described. Code testing procedures and user-feedback trials are discussed as well. The MEAN stack (MongoDB, Express, Angular, and Node.js) is used for the development platform. The application features a cloud database (Amazon Web Services) which is deployed via mLab. A cloud platform called Heroku is used for deploying the application. SSL Certificates are used to secure the web server and ensure that user information is safe. Designed with a responsive and mobile-first structure using Bootstrap 4, Tippet is tailored for anglers who want to view materials on their mobile device while on the move. The capability for anglers to store their own fly patterns to the database further sets this tool apart from similar applications and helps others in the community save time and money.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 10:20am - 10:40am
125 Rhoades Robinson Hall

10:35am

Two Degrees of Freedom Helicopter Testbed
Two degree of freedom testbeds are an important tool for understanding and testing control algorithms for dynamic vehicles such as helicopters. The UNCA Joint Engineering Mechatronics Program is developing a low cost option for testing attitude control algorithms for a two degree of freedom helicopter system. This test bench tracks rotation in both pitch and yaw directions allowing for the testing of control algorithms in a safe, crash free environment. This device will allow students to rapidly test and develop control algorithms in future projects, and increase educational opportunities in the engineering program.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 10:35am - 10:50am
103 Rhoades Robinson

10:35am

Everyone Meets Their End Eventually
It is estimated that around 68% of the United States population fear death. Through the process of Terror Management Theory, a way of combating feelings of dread and existentialism caused by one’s own mortality, the conversation of death is pushed back until more urgent circumstances arise. The artist embarked on this project in order to process their own fears and experiences with death. Is there a way to control Death Anxiety through the act of art making? Since one person’s passing is inevitable, this body of work is intended to reiterate the conversation of mortality. Each drawing centers on an individual known intimately by the artist. The sitter is asked questions including on whether they fear death, how they personally process their own mortality, if they believe if there is anything beyond the living world and if they would like to share any personal experiences with death. These answers are recorded and are presented alongside each the large corresponding drawing Artists exploring similar themes such as Kathe Kollwitz, Sophie Jodoin, Edgar Jerins, and Andy Warhol are researched and drawn from inspiration. With the use of once-living substances such as charcoal and graphite, the exhibition serves as an exploration of the diverse points of view on the inevitability of death. The interaction of the drawn individual and viewer creates an empathetic experience and promotes a reflection of the end of one’s life. With the expansive interpretations of dying coming from those who were interviewed, can the body of work begin to normalize death?


Tuesday April 24, 2018 10:35am - 10:55am
237 Owen Hall

10:35am

Climate Change In India: An Analysis Of Future Precipitation Rates
In recent decades, water stress in India has become increasingly severe. Lower crop yields, civil unrest, and increased political tensions have become more commonplace as severe weather events are becoming more extreme and sporadic. Because of this emerging reality and its potential consequences, it is vital to be able to anticipate potential changes in India’s precipitation rates as a byproduct of global climate change. Previous research points to an increase in precipitation as the climate warms, but with large regional disparity and more severe extremes in both rain events as well as droughts. To provide further support for this consensus across a variety of potential outcomes, multiple runs using the Global Circulation Model (GCM) EdGCM, have been used in an attempt to support these claims. These runs consist of different potential concentrations of major Greenhouse Gases based on a variety of possible trends found in the most recent Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report. This presentation will highlight expected changes in annual precipitation and interannual variability through the end of this century, as well as their underlying causes, in an attempt to determine potential issues facing future policymakers.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 10:35am - 10:55am
213 Rhoades Robinson Hall

10:35am

Genetic Diversity In Captive Lineages Of Chilabothrus inornatus, Puerto Rican Boa Constrictor
The endemic endangered Puerto Rican boa (Chilabothrus inornatus) has faced a variety of perils in its natural habitat, making it a species of concern in recent decades. While information regarding genetic diversity in wild populations of this species is finally being accrued, an analysis of the viability and relative genetic diversity contained in captive populations is entirely unknown, which hampers efforts to develop a captive species management plan. Here we provide that analysis using an 1100bp fragment of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene as well as nine microsatellite loci. We obtained 46 individual boas from captive populations in the United States from both private breeders and zoos. We were able to determine relatedness among individuals as well as overall genetic diversity in the captive population. We then compared these data to the same data obtained from wild populations across the island of Puerto Rico to determine genetic diversity in the captive population relative to wild lineages. These analyses provide a starting point for informed breeding decisions in captive individuals by decreasing potential for inbreeding. We hope to provide this information to facilitate stronger conservation decisions regarding this species.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 10:35am - 10:55am
014 Zeis Hall

10:35am

A Policy Analysis Of British Columbia’s Revenue Neutral Carbon Tax
This paper provides a policy analysis of the British Columbia Revenue Neutral Tax Program, framed through the Effectiveness, Efficiency, and Equity model. Effectiveness is defined as how well the tax solves the environmental issue of carbon pollution and the associated negative effects; Efficiency is determined by whether or not the benefits of the tax program outweigh the costs; Equity will be accessed by examining the distribution of the program’s cost and benefits amongst the population of British Columbia. Implemented in 2008, the carbon tax has been praised for simultaneously cutting back the carbon emissions of the province without inhibiting economic growth. The tax is now being used as a model for a Pan-Canadian carbon reduction program, which was implemented in January of 2018. The goal of the analysis is to determine if the carbon tax program accomplishes its goal of reducing greenhouse gas emissions whilst maintaining the social and economic welfare of the province it affects. The analysis is conducted through a thorough literature review of past environmental tax incentive programs and modern analyses of the British Columbia Revenue Neutral Program, with additional statistical support. The study finds that the carbon tax program is ultimately successful in its goal and provides an overall good example for programs of a similar nature, given that the economics of the region are taken into account.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 10:35am - 10:55am
035 Karpen Hall

10:35am

The Development Of Identity In Tillie Olsen's Yonnondio: From The Thirties
In 1974, Tillie Olsen published Yonnondio: From the Thirties, an unfinished novel she had written forty years earlier. The unusual circumstances of the novel’s publication, Olsen’s choice not to revise the manuscript that was recovered, and the lack of an intentional ending have been criticized by some scholars. However, the novel’s fragmentation serves to describe the mindset of Olsen’s characters who are experiencing extreme poverty. Focusing on the character of Mazie specifically, this thesis traces her experiences as she enters early adolescence and struggles to comprehend violence and injustice in the world around her. While the family becomes increasingly ensconced in industrial labor systems, Mazie goes through intense delirium and daydreams as an attempt to escape her situation and process traumatic experiences. However, Olsen indicates that Mazie cannot escape the insidious poverty that permeates the Holbrook’s family life, leading the reader to understand that Mazie’s life will follow the same path of her mother, Anna. While characters like Mazie emphasize the importance of the struggle to develop autonomy and individuality, Olsen also indicates their need for a supportive community. Ultimately, Olsen’s novel indicates that the only feasible way to escape the degrading conditions of capitalism is through the development of a collective class consciousness. In a distinctly proletariat work, Olsen gives a multi-faceted description of the nature of poverty and sexism in characters who are both realistic and sympathetic individuals, as well as representations of their class.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 10:35am - 10:55am
232 Karpen Hall

10:35am

Environmental Racism in the South: How Newspapers Have Changed the Narrative
This study explores the origins of the terms environmental justice and environmental racism in newspaper coverage in the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal from the years 1980 and 2017 as defined by Dr. Robert J. Bullard in his books Confronting Environmental Racism: Voices from the Grassroots, Unequal Protection: Environmental Justice and Communities of Color, and Dumping in Dixie: Race, Class, and Environmental Quality. By exploring the origins of the terms in newspaper coverage, this study will also provide understanding on related issues such as employment, housing, healthcare, food, and education. Through contrast and comparison of articles, the study seeks to provide a deeper understanding on environmental justice and environmental racism and how coverage has changed. In addition to a review of the literature, qualitative research was collected through interviews with local activists who directly work with the issues.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 10:35am - 10:55am
316 Karpen Hall

10:35am

Healthy Foods in Cherokee Childcare Facilities
Childhood obesity and other diet-related health issues are of concern for American Indians. American Indian children and adolescents are about thirty percent more likely to develop and suffer from obesity when compared to White children and adolescents. The American Indian population, on average, is twice as likely to be diagnosed with Diabetes than any other population in the United States. A promising intervention is in early childhood education centers, including the Dora Reed Center in Cherokee, North Carolina. The purpose of this project was to create a professional development program for the kitchen staff to help increase their knowledge surrounding cultural appropriate and nutritious dishes for the 266 children at the Dora Reed Center. Our methods included: a literature review to understand contributing factors for nutrition-related behaviors; a visit and conversations with center staff; visit to and learning about Rainbow in My Tummy in Black Mountain, and searching for culturally-relevant information. Through this process, our team learned about US Department of Agriculture Food Guidelines for Child Care Facilities, curriculum for preparing foods in child care settings, school-based programs, and cultural issues, such as Colonization’s effect on foods, food access issues, and different Tribal foods. Recommendations include requiring teachers to model healthy eating behaviors, offering alternatives and different food options, purchasing Rainbow in My Tummy and shadowing of the on-site chef, and distribution of calendars and recipes featuring seasonal foods and culturally appropriate dishes. If implemented, these efforts could result in a decrease in childhood obesity and prevention of future diagnoses of Diabetes across the American Indian populations.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 10:35am - 10:55am
406 Sherrill Center

10:35am

Dead Men Tell No Tales: The Evolution Of Spirit Communication From Séances To Spirit Photography In Nineteenth Century America
This paper examines the link between séances and spirit photography as an evolution from faith in Spiritualism, to the experience of the séance, to the physical object of faith found in spirit photography. When broken down, séances and spirit photography provide roughly the same product, a connection to deceaded loved ones, but with the latter being tangible and the former more indirect. There is an explicit connection between the two spiritual phenomenon. Spirit photography was able to develop out of the séance thanks to the advances in photography and the mass death caused by the American Civil War. This paper looks at this development step by step beginning with a basis in Spiritualism, the originating religion, moving on to a discussion of séances as a comforting activity for the bereaved. It followings up with some of the major advances in photography that made it both extremely popular and a commodity with an examination of the effects of the Civil War on the culture surrounding death and mourning, looking specifically at the commodification of mourning and the beginnings of photography’s popularity. Out of these elements, there is a culmination within spirit photography that draws on the same benefits of séances, the tangibility that photographs allowed, and the comfort needed by thousands due to the Civil War.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 10:35am - 10:55am
014 Whiteside Hall

10:35am

The Great Mossumentary
Fascinated by the plant we typically ignore, Mossin' Annie tells us all about her passion for moss. This Mossumentary takes us through her garden, on rescue missions and to her very own Mossery in Brevard, NC. Not only will you be entertained by the spirit of Mossin' Annie, but you will learn the magic of moss.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 10:35am - 10:55am
012 Karpen Hall

10:35am

Violence Against Humanitarian Aid Workers By Organized Non-State Armed Groups
Each year, dozens of aid workers are injured and killed every year by terrorist organizations, armed groups, and those looking to destabilize regions in order to implement their own government and impose their own ideologies. To predict the likelihood of violence against aid workers by non-state armed groups, and to estimate the effects that different types of groups have, this paper uses data from the 2014 Societal Violence Scale, HDI, GDP, and several other factors. This paper argues that the presence of different types of non-state armed groups directly affects the likelihood of violence against aid workers in a country. Specifically, this paper hypothesizes that global/transnational non-state armed groups will be most likely to perpetrate violence against aid workers due to their motives of changing the global ideology. The results claim that violence against aid workers is most likely to occur in countries with national-level and local-level non-state armed groups present. With this information, international aid organizations may be able to quantitatively calculate the risk of entering a destabilized country and weigh the security factors of providing aid to those in need.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 10:35am - 10:55am
237 Zageir Hall

10:35am

Seeing is Believing: Paranormal Belief Construction in the American South
Western culture is obsessed with the saying “seeing is believing.” Dominant groups in America put a lot of weight into rationality and scientific thinking in comparison to other embodied and spiritual forms of knowledge. Why is it, then, that paranormal belief is so pervasive in the American imagination? In fact, belief in some form of paranormal--ranging from traditional Christian ideas of resurrection and Virgin Birth to aliens and clairvoyance--is the norm, with 90% of Southern Focus Poll (SPF) respondents believing in one or more forms (Rice, 2003). The notion of ghosts and the paranormal “violate a number of binaries” that dominate Western culture: life or death, past or present, body or soul. (Baker and Bader, 2014). Rather than “or,” the paranormal exists within the and, where life and death are deeply intertwined. The paranormal subsist somewhere between conventional time and space, and belief in such leads to a “culturally powerful position” wherein participants can “shatter” the binary constraints of reality (Baker and Bader, 2014). The construction of this belief, however, varies across social locations. For this project, I will examine how various socioeconomic, ethnic, and religious groups interact with these binaries. In other words, how do differing groups know what they know about the paranormal? What influences paranormal belief? How is this knowledge constructed, and how do different groups perpetuate that knowledge? How do sociology and epistemology interact here?

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 10:35am - 10:55am
236 Zageir Hall

10:40am

In-Vitro And In-Silico Synthesis Of Anticancer Compounds To Halt Rapid Cell Division And Cleave DNA
Combretastatin A-4 is a naturally occurring compound isolated from the South African bushwillow Combretum caffrum. A variety of its analogs, such as 3,5-diaryl-4-iodopyrrole-2-carboxylate derivatives, have demonstrated anti-mitotic, anticancer, and antibiotic properties. The formation of these analogs serve as useful intermediates to synthesize more complex heterocyclic systems in addition to being the core structure of all lamellarins. Different methods consist of a 3-step one-pot procedure including a halogenation, and others contain a purification step prior to the halogenation. Both methods have acquired decently high yields (53% - 88%) with the one-pot reaction on the higher end. Not only does the one-pot method seem to be more efficient, yet it is faster and contains fewer individual steps. Furthermore, these analogs are to be tested both in-vivo and in-silico.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 10:40am - 11:00am
202 Zeis Hall

10:40am

Optimization And Characterization Of Antibiotic Compounds Produced By Bacteria
Increasing bacterial resistance to current antibiotic treatments poses a huge threat to the health of the human population. Over the past 20 years, there has been a significant decline in the production of new antibiotics, despite the rapid emergence of drug resistant pathogens. The isolation and extraction of structurally unique antibiotics from bacteria remains largely uninvestigated by current researchers. Natural products, however, are an abundant source of structurally diverse compounds with antibacterial activity that can be used to develop new and potent antibiotics. This research investigates techniques for determining optimal growth media and optimal time of antibiotic production for each bacteria sample from a library of bacteria species, as well as the extraction of antibiotic active compounds from bacteria.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 10:40am - 11:00am
123 Zeis Hall

10:40am

Why Wait?
Sitting down at a restaurant to eat should be a relatively quick and easy process. However, that is not always the case. Inspired by excessive wait times and crowded entrances, the Android mobile application “Why Wait?” was designed to enable users to enter a restaurant's wait queue from any location. Working with local restaurants, “Why Wait?” estimates the current wait time based on the number of customers are already in the queue and the average wait time of the five most recent guests. Restaurants are able view their current wait times and de-queue people as they are seated. “Why Wait?” allows restaurants to expand their seating and reservation service, providing a more pleasurable experience for guests and thus increasing the chance of a repeat customer. In this presentation, we examine the issues of design, implementation, and testing of this application.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 10:40am - 11:00am
125 Rhoades Robinson Hall

10:55am

Art And The Ego: Exploring Spiritual Success And Failure In The Creative Process
I wish to understand why some people are able to clearly communicate their creative expression and connect with others while others struggle to feel worthy of creating at all. I intend to combine my studies in metaphysics and psychology to identify questions that I can ask others in order to gain insight into a collective creative experience. I have incorporated my studies on how different cultures deal with healing and balancing emotional blockages, in connection with the metaphysical properties that different cultures have attributed to different materials in the natural world. I have put my studies in context with my sculptural work, which focuses on developing the intention behind each individual piece, and how that intention can be psychologically transformative. In addition to my studies and sculptural work, I have conducted interviews with students and others not necessarily in the creative field. I chose to do so going by the notion that all human beings have the capacity for creativity, and have to deal with emotional blockages and challenges that effect their ability to express themselves clearly and whole-heartedly. Mindset, a book written by Stanford University Psychologist Carol S. Dweck, illustrates the difference between a fixed mindset which believes intelligence is static, and the growth mindset which believes intelligence can be developed over time. These two spheres of thought are intertwined one’s own beliefs about their capacity to succeed, and have been taken into consideration when asking questions about how individuals perceive themselves, as well as their ability to grow through and past blockages.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 10:55am - 11:15am
237 Owen Hall

10:55am

Improving The Prediction Of Daily Maximum Temperatures Using A Neural Network
A weather forecaster uses model data, persistence, and historical data to predict values for weather variables on the following days. The application of a neural network to use the same data and train to identify a relationship between the predictors and the predicted value would result in a more refined source of data for weather forecasters to use. In this study a neural network is used to account for consistent bias in the models, overall trends in temperature, and current conditions to predict a maximum temperature for the next day. The model is trained on a dataset containing two models, historical daily maximum temperatures, and the previous day’s maximum temperature over two years from 2014 to 2016. The model is evaluated using data from 2016 to 2017, but will be able to take current data and predict the next day’s temperature with greater accuracy than model output. The neural network used is a multi-layer perceptron classifier that trains using backpropagation. The model will be assessed for accuracy and used to predict maximum daily temperatures for the Asheville area. This could result in improved reliability when predicting maximum temperatures. The model is easily scalable and could be used with various other weather variables to create more accurate data for forecasters to use and make short term weather forecasts that are more accurate than model output statistics.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 10:55am - 11:15am
213 Rhoades Robinson Hall

10:55am

Elucidating Cryptic Diversity In Burmese Lygosoma Skinks Via Integrative Taxonomy
Supple skinks (Reptilia; Lygosoma), named for their attenuate limbs, like many other Indochinese herpetofaunal groups, have experienced particular taxonomic turbidity over the past few decades. With a widespread geographic breadth (spanning most of Africa to continental and insular Asia), the majority of species within this group are exceptionally poorly known. As is the case with so many understudied cryptic species groups, Southeast Asian Lygosomine species-complexes, such as Lygosoma quadrupes, require comprehensive molecular and morphological assessments to resolve the evolutionary relationships of these cluttered taxa. Here, using comparative morphological and novel multilocus phylogenetic data, we apply targeted species delimitation techniques to the Lygosoma quadrupes complex, focusing in particular on species from Myanmar. In so doing, we reveal multiple cryptic lineages and provide insight on the taxonomic status of this group, as well as additionally biogeographic discussion. Our dataset also provides opportunities to examine the evolution of body elongation and limb attenuation, which has happened independently in several Indochinese skink lineages.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 10:55am - 11:15am
014 Zeis Hall

10:55am

Is There Gender Wage Inequality Among Professional Staff At UNC Asheville?
According to the National Partnership for Women & Families, in 2017, women in the United States are paid 80 cents for every dollar paid to men, amounting to an annual gender wage gap of $10,470. Due to this wage differential, one might assume that there are wage inequalities across genders present at the University of North Carolina at Asheville; however, because UNC Asheville is a Public Liberal Arts Institution with values that promote equity and equality, my hypothesis is that there will not be wage inequalities across genders after controlling for other characteristics that impact wages. A study conducted in 2017 by a UNCA economics student tested wage inequalities among faculty members of UNC Asheville with an emphasis on the impact of gender. The study’s findings concur with my hypothesis about staff salaries by stating that gender was an insignificant factor influencing faculty salary differences at UNC Asheville. The research presented in this paper will build on the previous study’s results by using an econometric approach applying OLS multivariable regressions to examine whether wage disparities exist among staff members at UNC Asheville. The dataset used in the research is compiled from public information used in the previous study and information obtained through a survey. Regression analysis tests will allow me to observe the relationships between an individual’s salary and independent variables in the study with emphasis on gender. From these observations, I will be able to analyze how each characteristic affects the magnitude of the salary earned, specifically looking at whether gender influences salary among professional staff at UNC Asheville.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 10:55am - 11:15am
035 Karpen Hall

10:55am

Recreating Jenny Lind: An Animatronic Installation for Times Square
Mel Chin, a renowned artist and Black Mountain College Legacy Fellow at UNC Asheville, first introduced WAKE, specifically the Jenny Lind figurehead project, in August 2017. From this, an interdisciplinary group of UNC Asheville engineering students, art students, and faculty came together to produce Mel's vision. The challenge? To design and recreate the Jenny Lind figurehead featured on the clipper ship, "Nightingale". Jenny Lind will find her first home in Times Square after being designed and constructed at UNC Asheville's STEAM Studio. Standing 16 feet tall and 21 feet long, she leans at a 49 degree angle and watches the activity above her. The figurehead features lifelike head and breathing movements that capture the emotion of someone who is saddened or distressed. These movements are meant to instill uneasiness in the viewer, prompting them to question what she might be viewing. This talk will describe the design and construction challenges faced in bring Jenny to life.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 10:55am - 11:15am
103 Rhoades Robinson

10:55am

Thoughtful Laughter: Satire And Fantasy As Social Commentary In Terry Pratchett's Discworld
Historically, literary scholars typify the fantasy genre as little more than escapism, allowing audiences to put down their briefcases and pick up a broadsword. Satire is generally more palatable, less of a broadsword and more of a rapier, comforting the afflicted and afflicting the all-too comfortable. British fantasy author Terry Pratchett’s Discworld series wields one in each hand, creating a unique “jokes and daggers” world of hilarious hijinks and sobering social commentary. Pratchett’s work is also a major seat of contention as it is both critically acclaimed and dismissed for the debated literary merit of the fantasy genre. Common discourses include Pratchett’s pairing of “low-brow” humour and social critique, and the depth and purpose of his characters in their comedic, satirical setting. The objective of this paper is to examine Pratchett’s particular platform of fantasy and satire from which social criticisms are voiced, with specific focus given to the role one of his most popular characters, Death, plays in this commentary. A non-human, anthropomorphic personification of the act of dying, Death provides a unique outsider’s perspective of humanity. While the Discworld is populated with a number of fascinating non-human entities (such as The Luggage, a sentient trunk both fiercely loyal and eerily homicidal), Death possesses a certain grandfatherly fascination and fondness towards humans; the conflation of Death’s purpose and his personality manifests as an unmistakably Horatian satirical voice. Thus, Pratchett’s manipulations of fantasy and satirical conventions create meaningful dialogue with his audience about belief, identity, and duty (and moral obligation) through Death. Pratchett exemplifies the progressive potential of the fantasy genre, using complex interplay between the “real” and “unreal” to successfully enable his audience to both recognize and question ideological superstructures.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 10:55am - 11:15am
232 Karpen Hall

10:55am

The Impact Of Social Media On Environmental Nonprofits
This project examines the impact that social media has on an environmental nonprofit. Social media can help nonprofits to garner volunteers, donations, and awareness for the organization’s mission. Data was collected through using social media analytic tools including Meltwater, Facebook analytics, Instagram analytics, and Hootsuite. The data was then examined to determine how big of an impact, if any, social media have on the organization. Growth in volunteer base and donations were examined from August of 2017 to April 2018. Rise in awareness for the organization and its movement were examined through growth in followers and interaction on social media. Although many research articles show that social media is a growing method for marketing, it is important to determine how impactful it can be to environmental nonprofits with a minimal public relations and marketing budget.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 10:55am - 11:15am
316 Karpen Hall

10:55am

Resistiendo Autoridad Colonial en Brava Gente Brasileira (2000) de Lúcia Murat
La directora Lúcia Murat ilustra el choque entre los indígenas brasileños, los guaicurus y los colonizadores portugueses en la película Brava Gente Brasileira (2000). Esta historia de lucha entre los guaicurus y los colonizadores pasó en el siglo XVIII que es actuado en la película por los kadiweu que son los últimos descendientes de los guaicurus. Los portugueses explícitamente abusan, asesinan, degradan y explotan a los nativos para usar su tierra y sus recursos. La comunidad indígena y sus personajes manipulados no son sumisos y actúan ingeniosamente para resistir y contraatacar a los colonizadores. La representación de esta resistencia recalca la vulgaridad y la hipocresía de los colonizadores como una narrativa que contraargumenta la pasividad que supone la historia del “descubrimiento” del “Nuevo Mundo”. Murat permite que su audiencia entienda este evento del encuentro entre Europa y su “territorio” colonial para reflejar cómo han afectado los espacios y vidas de las comunidades indígenas. Hoy en dia esos cambios se reflejan en los kadiweus que sobrevivieron la invasión brutal.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 10:55am - 11:15am
014 Whiteside Hall

10:55am

SHE
A detective with a limited sense of humor stumbles upon a conspiracy and must investigate to expose the truth.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 10:55am - 11:15am
012 Karpen Hall

10:55am

Blood, Soil, Terrorism: An Analysis Of Domestic Terrorism Through The Lens Of Citizenship Laws

This paper looks to discover why some countries experience more domestic terrorist attacks than others. It explores whether nationality law type is a determinant. Ethnic and religious fractionalization, regime type, GDP per capita and population have been previously identified as determinants and are used as controls. This paper hypothesizes that countries that practice jus soli nationality laws will experience fewer terrorist attacks. The evidence that nationality laws affect the frequency of domestic terrorism is inconclusive. In some of the regression models, the relationship of jus soli laws was negative, which met the expectation of the hypothesis. At other times, it was positive. Additionally, India was observed longitudinally due to their change in citizenship laws in 1987. These data supported the hypothesis overwhelmingly; during jus soli years, 226 fewer attacks were observed. While this is supportive of the hypothesis, more research is needed to substantiate the claim that citizenship laws drive the incidence of terrorist attacks.


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Tuesday April 24, 2018 10:55am - 11:15am
237 Zageir Hall

10:55am

Youth Participation in Athletics as a Deterrence from Juvenile Delinquency
During the developmental stages of youth, the presence of positive social bonds and a sense of belonging are essential to deter juvenile delinquency. Athletics specifically can be an outlet for youth to avoid criminal behavior. Like other extracurricular activities, sports unites children as a team forming a sense of “community” or “togetherness.” Participating on sports teams creates social bonds and consumes a majority of youths’ free time lowering chances of youth to turn to crime. Numerous studies have already been conducted affirming this relationship. Past research contains conflicting data, therefore a meta-analysis will be conducted to synthesize and integrate previous findings and explore the patterns in relation to athletics that deter juvenile delinquency. Results will indicate that youth who are involved in athletics are less likely to be involved in juvenile delinquency due to the strong bonds generated from being on a team. Applying this evidence into our society will assist in the daily efforts to reduce juvenile delinquency rates.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 10:55am - 11:15am
236 Zageir Hall

11:00am

Spectroscopic Study of mechanical movement in the Fo motor of E. coli ATP synthase
F1Fo ATP synthase is present in all life and is responsible for the production of almost all adenosine triphosphate (ATP), which is one of the most prolific energy molecules that are synthesized during metabolism. Fo converts electrochemical potential into mechanical rotation, which drives conformational changes in F1 that facilitate the synthesis of ATP. The mechanism of rotation of the subunit c ring is not known, but there are currently two hypotheses. This study will look for evidence of the ratcheting mechanism of rotation, which states that the helices of subunits a and c act like mechanical gears during rotation. This mechanism would require the α-helices of subunit a that lie on the a-c interface to move during rotation. Site directed mutagenesis was used to mutate aV71C, which is located on a loop. This mutant ATP synthase was purified and then chemically modified with a spin label, which can be observed using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The EPR signal is sensitive to the protein environment and will provide data on the mobility of the residue to which the spin label is attached. This particular mutant appeared to be immobile in the data collected. The quality of the data will be improved by using different purification methods and comparing their efficiency. Protein purification will be optimized using varying imidazole concentrations. A new ATPase assay will be developed.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 11:00am - 11:20am
123 Zeis Hall

11:00am

The Synthesis And Characterization Of The Functionalized Metal-Ligand Complex, [Co(4-brbpy)3]3+
Cobalt complexes formed from 2,2’-bipyridine (bpy) have been used to study electron transfer mechanisms, to facilitate redox reactions in solar cells, and to catalyze the reduction of alkynes. Investigation into solar cells for renewable alternative energy is of particular significance in the modern economic climate. However, there is comparatively less research into the preparation and use of functionalized cobalt-bpy complexes, notably those that could serve as reactants for additional chemical synthesis. In this research, a scheme for the synthesis and characterization of the as-yet unreported functionalized complex [Co(4-brbpy)3]3+ (4-brbpy = 4-bromo-2,2’-bipyridine) is proposed. The synthesis of this complex resembles that previously published for the related complex [Co(4-fbpy)3]3+ (4-fbpy = 4-fluoro-2,2’-bipyridine) with modifications taken from other similar syntheses. Characterization of the synthesized product is carried out via nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), infrared (IR), and ultraviolet/visible (UV/vis) spectroscopies. Analysis of NMR spectra and accompanying COSY spectra suggest the precipitated solid product is the target [Co(4-brbpy)3]3+ complex. Spectroscopic measurements of purified [Co(4-brbpy)3]3+ is compared to those of the unfunctionalized complex [Co(bpy)3]3+ to understand how functionalization of the bpy ligand changes the properties of these complexes.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 11:00am - 11:20am
202 Zeis Hall

11:00am

Speedy Shopper
Almost everyone has struggled to find a specific item even in stores they feel comfortable with. What’s worse is attempting to shop in a store the consumer is unfamiliar with. This can prevent them from trying new and better stores due to intimidation, the amount of work needed, or a lack of time to learn the layout of the store. Our android application solves these problems by providing a straightforward way to navigate stores confidently, no matter what level of familiarity you have with them. It is fast, easy to use, and intuitive while also allowing the consumer to update it with any changes to their current store, or even create a way to navigate new ones by manually inputting store dimensions and item locations. Once this basic information is collected, the application accepts a shopping list and creates a downloadable image file detailing the fastest route from the entrance to the exit of the store while confidently navigating the store and collecting each item on the list. Once the map has been created the information file can be downloaded and used by any person with the application on their phone. The speedy shopper accomplishes this by creating nodes placed at a stores intersection and the locations of items on a customer’s shopping list. Our application calculates the shortest distance for each possible combination of shopping list item nodes before choosing the combination which results in the smallest space traveled. In this presentation we will go into greater detail on the functionality of the application as well as a live demo using an Asheville based retail store as an example.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 11:00am - 11:20am
125 Rhoades Robinson Hall

11:15am

Interactivity Of Being
This research speaks to one’s interactivity with place as it relates to installation art. We are not static beings. Perceptions, actions, and approach have the power to mold our surroundings, just as experiences and places leave unique impressions on us. Here, place is defined in a broader sense: a physical space, an occasion in the external world, a setting, an arena. In two of her most recent installations, the artist finds herself drawn to the places of tension between things, specifically in the moment of dawn, a parentheses between night and day. Dawn awakens us to this place of tension, a threshold between the unconscious experience of dreams and the more aware self presented to the world. By invoking light and color in conversation with form and natural materials, the artist comments upon their character through immersive experiences, posing questions of perception intentionally left unanswered. The audience is presented with shifting variables of light, shadow, color, and transparency, so that an air of mystery inevitably arises. It is an experience that asks the viewer to fully engage their senses, thereby giving the audience as much agency as the artist and her work.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 11:15am - 11:35am
237 Owen Hall

11:15am

Case Study Analysis Of Ozone Concentrations In Houston TX During Hurricane Harvey
Ozone and sulfur dioxide are two of the six criteria pollutants monitored by the Clean Air Act, as they pose many human health and environmental risks, which is of particular concern in Houston TX. Due to the several hundred petrochemical plants and the several dozen crude oil refineries in Houston, the city experiences some of the highest concentrations of ozone, sulfur dioxide, and peroxy radicals of any city in the United States. The complex geography, influence of the inertial gravity wave (i.e. sea breeze), and the normal synoptic-scale flow makes Houston unique regarding ozone attainment. The landfall of Hurricane Harvey in Houston in August 2017 created an opportunity to assess the city’s ozone response. Ozone, wind, and volatile organic compound (VOC) data collected before, during, and after the hurricane are analyzed. Using a network of automated observation sites between the Houston ship channel and the city center, VOC (e.g. Benzene, Ethane, Ethylene, and Sulfur Dioxide) increases were correlated with non-typical ozone changes (NTOCs). As a result of the flooding, winds, and shutdown of petrochemical plants, several tons of VOCs were released, contributing to the highest 8 h ozone average in 2017 for the entire state of Texas. Additionally, from September 1 to September 5 average wind speeds were ≤ 5 mph, and wind directions were primarily from the East, allowing ozone and VOCs to advect to and build up in the Houston downtown area.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 11:15am - 11:35am
213 Rhoades Robinson Hall

11:15am

Population Genetic Structure And Hybridization Within Western North Carolina Sarracenia (Pitcher Plants)
The Sarracenia (pitcher plant) genus, a group of carnivorous perennial herbs, includes many species of conservation concern. Sarracenia species can hybridize when in sympatry, with seemingly few pre-zygotic barriers to cross-fertilization. Two pitcher plant species, S. jonesii (mountain sweet pitcher plant) and S. purpurea var. montana (mountain purple pitcher plant), are native to western North Carolina bogs, and others, including S. flava (yellow pitcher plant) and S. leucophylla (white pitcher plant), have been introduced to the region. In this study, we examined the genetic composition of phenotypically hybrid plants and S. pupurea var. montana individuals from a site in which these four species co-occur. Plants were non-destructively sampled, DNA was extracted, and samples were PCR-amplified at 6 (hybrid) or 8 (S. purpurea var. montana) microsatellite loci; after fragment analysis, microsatellite lengths were quantified in Geneious. Calculations of hybrid indices showed that all individuals contained S. jonesii and S. purpurea var. montana DNA, and that the contribution of S. purpurea var. montana DNA to hybrid plants ranged from 20 - 40%. The latter result is of particular concern, as S. purpurea var. montana is being considered for federal listing. Genetic diversity indices for S. purpurea var. montana individuals showed low levels of allelic and genotypic diversity. Ongoing experiments are investigating genetic diversity within and among S. jonesii and S. purpurea var. montana sites in western North Carolina, to better understand population dynamics and prioritize conservation work.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 11:15am - 11:35am
014 Zeis Hall

11:15am

Exploring The High-End Camera Industry: The Effect Of New Market Entrants Over The Last 10 Years
Each year there are new high-end cameras released that improve on the previous model. They do this through increased color depth, dynamic range, and low-light ISO performance through sensor technology improvements as well as improved design features. Have these innovations in the aforementioned categories been slowed down due to decreased revenue for camera manufacturers as a result of smartphones taking over the camera industry? The purpose of this paper is to gain an in-depth understanding on how the high-end camera industry has been affected by the growth of smartphone cameras and other cheaper cameras. In order to gain this insight, I ran a difference in differences model comparing high-end cameras released before the advent of smartphones with high quality cameras built in compared to high-end camera models released after smartphones with high-quality cameras had been popular with the average consumer. I controlled for initial price of each camera, manufacturer of each camera, type of camera, release date of each camera, color depth, low-light ISO performance, and an overall composite score that combines color depth, dynamic range, and low-light ISO performance into one value. From these variables, I determined if high-end camera sensor technology has declined in growth over time and what effect an increase in smartphone use with high quality cameras has had.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 11:15am - 11:35am
035 Karpen Hall

11:15am

“A Positive Failure”: Holy Foolishness, Paradox, And Narrative In Dostoevsky’s The Idiot
This project addresses the Eastern Orthodox cultural phenomenon of the holy fool and how it functions paradoxically in the narrative of The Idiot, which is often regarded as Dostoevsky's most bizarre and difficult novel. The purpose of holy fool is to provide a Christian ideal of provocative goodness in a society otherwise dominated by lust and greed. The novel’s titular character, Prince Myshkin, attempts to fulfil the religious identity of the holy fool, but ultimately fails in view of the novel’s tragic ending. This seemingly unredemptive ending informs the critical reception of the novel as a failure. However, Myshkin’s failure was intended by Dostoevsky from the beginning and is, I will argue, the conflict meant to engage its readers in an interpretative exercise to consider the compatibility of spirituality and the competing secular egoisms of 19th century Russia. This interpretative exercise also goes beyond 19th century Russia by causing the reader to rethink the definitions of illness, idiocy, and sanctity.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 11:15am - 11:35am
232 Karpen Hall

11:15am

Social Media In The Nonprofit Sphere
This case study will analyze the benefits of social media as part of a strategic communications plan for Clean Water for North Carolina (CWFNC), a non-profit organization serving all 100 counties within the state. Through the implementation of social media tactics, this case study seeks to identify whether CWFNC can maximize its reach and exposure to target audiences through social media platforms. Data were collected using social media analytic tools, including HootSuite Pro, Meltwater and those provided by Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. In conjunction with the utilization of social media, news coverage for CWFNC was also examined. This case study explores the benefits of implementing a strategic social media plan and the analysis of social media tactics and subsequent earned media through news coverage, comments, likes and reposts.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 11:15am - 11:35am
316 Karpen Hall

11:15am

Techniques To Prevent Overuse Injuries Among Collegiate Athletes
The long-term consequences of overuse injuries can impact both academic and athletic performance of collegiate athletes. Over the course of my research I have identified and summarized the determinants leading to high rates of overuse injury. To prevent chronic health consequences resulting from untreated injuries, I will propose a series of strategies to implement with NCAA Collegiate Athletes. Using evidence based data I will discuss the use of acquiring proper technology to track athlete training, combined with implementing correct periodization models. Using these data collection methods will allow coaches to identify and adjust training before a decline in performance occurs.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 11:15am - 11:35am
406 Sherrill Center

11:15am

Why Do Candidates Reject "Free" Money?: Examining Candidate Calculus In Presidential Primaries
In 1974, Congress amended the Federal Election Campaign Act (FECA) to create a public funding option in presidential primaries, in an attempt to level the playing field between establishment and underdog candidates. However, beginning in the 1990s, people saw candidates rejecting these public funds, which essentially amount to “free” money. Why do some candidates reject public financing? This paper argues that institutional factors, such as restrictions on when and where candidates can spend these funds, coupled with features of the electoral system, such as front-loading, can explain this trend. Further, the paper argues that underdog candidates should be more likely to reject public funds because of restrictions on spending in early key states. Using data from the Federal Election Commission from 1976 to 2000, the paper finds partial support for the hypotheses. The paper finds strong support for the contention that front-loading has an effect on the decision to reject these funds. However, the paper do not find support for the hypothesis that underdog candidates are more likely to reject. The results of this study raise important questions about the unintended consequences of institutions and the effect of campaign finance law in the United States.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 11:15am - 11:35am
237 Zageir Hall

11:15am

I Can't Breathe: Musical Protests in the Black Lives Matter Movement
Due to numerous highly publicized killings of unarmed black men and subsequent lack of justice for their killers, a social tipping point was reached in 2014. In response to these many racial injustices, the social movement called Black Lives Matter was formed to fight institutionalized racism and challenge anti-blackness that permeates the white-dominated society of the United States (Black Lives Matter 2018 “Herstory”). Through content analysis of song lyrics, it will be shown that music reflects the themes of the Black Lives Matter Movement, such as addressing police brutality and mass incarceration as racial injustices. Music which addresses racial injustice will be referred to as musical protest. The potential effects of these musical protests may be to increase participation and awareness, as well as to spread messages of the movement to wider audiences. Music may be a unique rhetorical medium for communicating about police brutality and institutionalized racism, expressing pain and anger nonviolently, and engaging in social conversations and negotiations about race in the United States. Therefore, music may serve crucial functions in the Black Lives Matter Movement so that a complete understanding of the dynamics of the social movement may not be reached without consideration given to musical protests.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 11:15am - 11:35am
236 Zageir Hall

11:15am

Pancake Purgatory
A groggy truck driver swerves off the road and into the parking lot of a diner inhabited by a group of lost souls from decades past. Will he be stranded there as well? Is this his "last breakfast"?


Tuesday April 24, 2018 11:15am - 11:55am
012 Karpen Hall

11:20am

Development of a liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method for the detection and quantification of eleven common over-the-counter medications in human urine
Ibuprofen, loratadine, naproxen, and several other common over-the-counter medications are known inhibitors of glucuronosyl transferase, which are responsible for the metabolism and excretion of phthalates, ubiquitous industrial chemicals and environmental pollutants. Existing studies on phthalate diesters and their monoester metabolite concentrations in humans suggest individual metabolism of phthalates varies both between and within individuals, but the mechanism of this inter- and intra-individual variation remains unknown. Glucuronosyl transferase inhibition by over-the-counter medications may affect individual phthalate metabolism, and therefore may explain patterns in inter- and intra-individual metabolic variation. In the following study, novel liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry and solid phase extraction methods were developed to quantify over-the-counter medication levels in human urine of known phthalate monoester levels to assess their role in the inhibition of phthalate metabolism.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 11:20am - 11:40am
202 Zeis Hall

11:20am

Cloning Vomeronasal Type-2 Receptors For Expression And Analysis In A Cell Culture Model System
The vomeronasal organ (VNO) is an olfactory sense organ in the nose of mice that detects pheromone signals through ligand binding to G-protein coupled receptors. There are three families of VNO receptors, V1R, V2R, and FPR. V2Rs in mice primarily serve to bind large molecules like the major urinary proteins (MUPs), proteins secreted in urine that trigger contextual behaviors in the recipient. Through combinatorial coding, multiple combinations of MUPs can activate multiple V2Rs in different ways, leading to complex signals based on a small library of ligands. However, VNO receptors are orphaned, it is not known which MUP ligand binds with which VNO receptor. This research set out to deorphanize V2Rs and pair them with their cognate ligands to create a library of receptor-ligand pairings. Receptor deorphanization will involve cloning V2Rs into mammalian cells, then analyzing them using patch clamp to measure membrane voltage changes when exposed to MUP ligands. Sequences coding for V2Rs were amplified through PCR, visualized on a gel, relevant bands were extracted and purified, then TOPO cloned into bacterial plasmids and transformed into JM109 E. coli cells for mass growth. Plasmids from E. coli were restriction digested to verify insert sequence length, then ligated into mammalian pEGFP vectors for eventual transfection into eukaryotic cells. To date, receptors have been cloned, visualized, extracted, purified, and transformed for V2Rs 34, 60, 92, 121, 122, 81, and 83. One sample (122-1) indicated a full length sequence, and has been ligated and sent for sequencing. If the results indicate a full length sequence inside the mammalian vector, the plasmid will be transfected for surface expression. This experiment is an important first step to being able to better understand and map the exact neural pathways activated by an environmental chemical stimulus, and how it produces a response in the host.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 11:20am - 11:40am
123 Zeis Hall

11:20am

Implementing Musical Instrument Digital Interface in Virtual Reality
Virtual reality captured the public’s interest in the 1980’s and 90’s with the release of several early VR devices and increased media attention on the technology. At the same time, the new Musical Instrument Digital Interface (MIDI) protocol was growing in popularity as a means to bridge the analog and digital realms of music production. Both technologies have come a long way, but the interfacing of the two is relatively untrodden territory. Combining the utility of MIDI with the visually and physically engaging nature of VR will allow users to interact with their music in wholly new ways. Using Unity 5 and the HTC Vive headset and controllers, this application functions as a virtual reality MIDI controller in the form of a theremin. By converting locational data to MIDI events and sending them over a UDP connection to a virtual MIDI input, users are able to communicate MIDI messages from VR to their favorite audio plugin host application. The application was developed using Unity 5, Visual Studio, C#, and Tobias Erichsen’s teVirtualMIDI driver library.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 11:20am - 11:40am
125 Rhoades Robinson Hall

11:35am

Fight The Future: Building Walls Of Resistance
Opening on the 15th anniversary of the US invasion of Iraq, Ash Lounsbury’s installation Fight the Future looks at the development of civilian surveillance in a post-9/11 world. Using interdisciplinary methods of sculpture and new media, Fight the Future offers a projection for a coming era of absolute surveillance via personal and home-integrated technology. Discarded goods constructing immersive environments comment on the liquid modernity of cybernetic technologies, the deluge of data produced or mined by those technologies, and the user’s own complicity in undermining traditions of privacy. With the use of projected text taking leaf from Jenny Holzer, the installation reminds viewers of the risks to privacy they are already taking. How can activism rise in a policed state? How can freedom of speech exist in a controlled virtual space? How can a people go against a government that potentially has access to such banal information as how many steps they took that day? These questions inform Lounsbury’s process of creating dystopian, anxiety-filled environments.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 11:35am - 11:55am
237 Owen Hall

11:35am

Using morphology and Mitochondrial Cytochrome-B gene comparison in determining origins and genetic similarities.
Clinostomus funduloides, commonly known as rosyside dace, are a minnow species found in western North Carolina where they inhabit areas of narrow, rocky, headwater streams. Their range extends into Ohio, South Carolina, Tennessee, and a few parts of Pennsylvania. Within western North Carolina rosyside dace can be found in almost every water basin and recently have been found in the Upper French Broad (UFB) river basin. Past work on the CYT-B gene of C. funduloides revealed a clade between the Catawba and French Broad samples dating back 2.4 million years. This lead to a conclusion of bait-bucket release as the point of introduction of C. funduloides into the French Broad river basin. Sequencing of the 1140 bp mitochondrial cytochrome-B gene (CYT-B) gene have now been done on four populations of C. funduloides (from the Broad River basin, Catawba river basin, and the French Broad River basin) to gain a better understanding of the relationships among the different populations of C. funduloides. Morphology of C. funduloides is also being taken into account by measuring body depth and counting scales along the lateral line. C. funduloides’ presence in the UFB is intriguing because of its separation from other populations by the Eastern Continental Divide. By looking at genetics and morphology, we will be able to determine the origins of the UFB population and how unique the UFB population is compared to others.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 11:35am - 11:55am
014 Zeis Hall

11:35am

The Ubuntu Index: An Indicator Of Prosperity Within The United States
This research intends to rethink the approach to economic indices and create a composite indicator according to a shared sense of prosperity. The Ubuntu Index strives to be an all-encompassing measure of human prosperity by combining traditional economic measurements of prosperity with crucial but often overlooked measures. The composite indicator is for the 50 states of the US based on data from 2014. Called the “Ubuntu Index” (Ubuntu: “humanity towards others”), the index combines income per capita with overlooked aspects of well-being. To do this, the Ubuntu Index includes five dimensions: income, income equality, health, happiness, and environment. The construction of the index is based on a strong ten-step methodological framework developed by the OECD. In this ten-step process, the index is discussed from theoretical framework all the way through the data analysis and results. The index is built and analyzed using transparent statistical methods, and these methods are compared to other indices to push discussion about the use of composite indicators to measure well-being in the future. The Ubuntu Index is preceded by other composite indices, such as the Human Development Index, that have combined individual indicators in an attempt to better portray growth and development.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 11:35am - 11:55am
035 Karpen Hall

11:35am

Pixelated Faces In IRL (In Real Life) Places: Exploring How “Textese” In Melissa Broder’s So Sad Today Builds Community Among Confessional Women Writers
Published in 2016 shortly after she revealed herself as the author behind the popular @SoSadToday Twitter account, So Sad Today is a collection of personal and confessional essays by poet and essayist, Melissa Broder. With a focus on highlighting autobiographical topics such as her struggle with mental illness, the impact of casual sex on her understanding of love, and the crippling existential dread that permeates her everyday life, Broder uses “textese” – or texting language – in So Sad Today to write about the intimate details of her life. The ways in which she employs textese resonates with a broad audience but especially with millennials who are familiar with technology-related language trends that continue to evolve with digital innovations. In interviews, Broder has commented on the influence confessional writers, including Sylvia Plath and Anne Sexton, have had on her work; certainly readers familiar with the history of confessional literature can see how Broder’s work fits into that history. Broder has said that Plath and Sexton “weren’t afraid to bring emotion into poetry, and they showed the weave between darkness and light.” Yet Broder’s use of textese sets her collection apart from other works of confessional literature, and this thesis examines how the incorporation of this developing language trend opens a space not only for readers but also for aspiring women writers in particular who might want to use a similar technique to write about difficult life experiences. By applying reader-response criticism and reception theory to Broder’s work, this thesis contends that the digital era is ushering in a new kind of confessional literature, one that in some ways is even more welcoming to those who might otherwise have difficulty giving voice to their stories, all the while acknowledging that such digital access is not ubiquitous.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 11:35am - 11:55am
232 Karpen Hall

11:35am

Creating Concern: The Use Of Claims Making In Environmental Justice Campaigns
This qualitative research paper will focus on the techniques by which environmental justice organizers determine issues of concern and in what ways they communicate about them. Environmental justice is typically done through claims making, or providing evidence of injustice and proposing how things ought to be. This study seeks to analyze the way environmental justice campaigns frame the issue by making these claims and how they communicate with the community, especially through various forms of social media. In particular, the study seeks to understand how claims making applies to media frames, agenda setting and risk management. Research on past and present environmental justice campaigns, in-depth interviews with environmental communicators and social media from the Beyond Coal campaign will be analyzed to determine the most common methods of communicating environmental justice and what is the most effective. The study will look at the tweets and other social media posts surrounding the Beyond Coal campaign for the past month. The goal of this research is to better understand how issues of environmental justice are communicated about and therefore how they might be understood by the public

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 11:35am - 11:55am
316 Karpen Hall

11:35am

Ted Style Talk: We’re All Mad Here: Disparate Value And Care For Physical And Mental Health
People often care for their physical health more than their mental health. Stigma holds people back from talking about their mental health issues. Even when they are ready to discuss these issues, lack of education and high cost limits where and who they can contact to receive the necessary help. This talk will examine the use of outreach programs and organizations specializing in mental health to better educate community members and bridge the accessibility gap between medical providers. Establishing more collaborative care between mental health specialists and primary care physicians can improve accessibility, coordinate care and cut cost through reducing payment to a single bill. Another important method this talk will examine is the elimination of stigma for future generations through increased mental health awareness and education beginning at the elementary school levels. Increasingly, many programs and organizations utilizing these methods have found positive reports, such as patients reporting a higher quality of care, lowered cost in bills, a better understanding of mental health issues, and becoming more knowledgeable of local, qualified facilities capable of treating their needs. With these findings and new approaches to care, it becomes clear that the mind and body are equally important for one’s health and overall well-being. One cannot care for just a single part of the body and expect to thrive while the rest of their body is neglected. In fact, that expectation would be madness.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 11:35am - 11:55am
406 Sherrill Center

11:35am

Juveniles In Jail: ALEC Membership And Juvenile Incarceration Throughout The States
The state of Hawaii has every sociological factor that contributes to high juvenile incarceration rates: high poverty, large economic gaps, high levels of substance abuse, and poor education. What is puzzling about this is that Hawaii has some of the lowest juvenile incarceration rates in the United States. What explains juvenile incarceration rates across the states? This paper explores the political factors that contribute to juvenile incarceration; in particular, the focus is on state participation in the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC). This organization is a council between legislators and corporations, many of which are in the private prison industry. ALEC incentivizes legislators to increase incarceration rates through funding, networking, and electoral support. States, such as Pennsylvania, have had over forty representatives in ALEC, and also have incredibly high rates of incarceration, especially among juveniles. In contrast, Hawaii’s legislators have little to do with the organization, and low levels of juvenile incarceration. The tie between this council and crime could be the answer to Hawaii’s crime rate, and should provide insights on mass juvenile incarceration in the United States. The results have shown that ALEC membership has a significant effect on juvenile incarceration rates. It is important to understand their heavy hand in creating legislation and how it affects state level incarceration rates, and those in the United States as a whole.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 11:35am - 11:55am
237 Zageir Hall

11:35am

Weaving The Narrative: Material Culture Analysis Of The Elegiac Patchwork Of Selections From The NAMES Project AIDS Memorial Quilt
Discourse involving the Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) epidemic have centered on the social and political climate at the onset of the outbreak in the early 1980’s. At that time, AIDS was categorized as a gay disease and initially labeled terms such as “gay cancer” and “the gay plague.” As gay men began to die exponentially from this disease they were further marginalized by the lack of governmental involvement and societal stigma. Thus, personal and intimate stories of those who lost their battle to AIDS and individuals who were close to them were pushed to the periphery of society. The purpose of this study is to illustrate how the NAMES Project AIDS Memorial Quilt acts as more than a tool for awareness and site of grieving; it humanizes the lived experience of each individual memorialized within its panels by preserving their stories. Through content analysis of a selection of quilt panels, cathartic and symbolic themes are explored. These threaded themes, such as the importance of naming the deceased and the significance of the clothing, photographs, handwritten letters, and other paraphernalia mosaically exhibited on the panels, provide a plurality of voices to these otherwise hidden and silenced narratives. The results of this research add these narratives into dominant historical discourse surrounding the AIDS epidemic.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 11:35am - 11:55am
236 Zageir Hall

11:40am

Determining Evironmental Adaptive Capacity of Building Parcels Through Natural Language Processing
Climate Change has fundamentally altered how local governments approach disaster preparedness. A shifting climate exposes a greater variety of vital infrastructure to possible damage, which could have a cascading effect in an area’s ability to shelter and aid its citizens. As new disaster models are being developed it is necessary to evaluate the level of trauma buildings could be exposed to and the structures’ capacity to sustain that damage; a measurement known as adaptive capacity. Determining adaptive capacity at scale has proven to be difficult due to the historical difference in how buildings were constructed and when those regulations have been changed. Through the use of machine learning algorithms and neural networks, we have created a data pipeline to analyze legal corpus to determine its relevance in calculating the adaptive capacity of a series of land parcels. By utilizing Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA) models we are able to break a legal corpus down into its constituent topics and use network analysis to determine the relative difference between known relevant legal data. This data is then used in a feed-through neural network to further break down legal sentences into a vector space, using semantic analysis to determine the discrete values which determine the adaptive capacity of a land parcel. In this presentation we will visualize, compare and discuss the machine learning algorithms implementation in this data pipeline, the success rate in determining the relevant information, and future plans for incorporating other forms of disaster preparedness into the data pipeline.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 11:40am - 12:40pm
125 Rhoades Robinson Hall

12:00pm

Importance Of Isoleucine 55 For Rotor-Stator Interactions In E Coli F1FO ATP Synthase
ATP synthase, a ubiquitous biological nanomachine, is responsible for synthesizing the majority of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in cells. The process of synthesizing ATP uses a unique rotary mechanism, which involves two motors, F1 and FO where protons get translocated in FO. Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) maps have given insight into the structure of Escherichia coli (E. coli) ATP synthase; however, they do not explain the intricacies of how protons drive rotation. Previous studies showed that proton translocation occurs at the subunit a/c interface (located in FO) and that some amino acid residues are important for function; among these is isoleucine 55 of subunit c (cI55). We are trying to elucidate what chemical properties are essential for functionality at position 55, which is located on the second transmembrane helix (TMH2) of subunit c. Changes in the side chain will be imposed using site directed mutagenesis and chemical modifications via methanethiosulfonate and functionality observed using fluorescence spectrometry. Replacing isoleucine with alanine (cI55A) resulted in H+ pumping that behaves similarly to that of the wild type. This result leads us to believe that steric bulk is not an essential property at this position, and we are currently looking at the importance of hydrophobicity.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Sherrill Center Concourse

12:00pm

A New Species Of Dwarf Gecko (Sphaerodactylus) From The Virgin Islands
West Indian dwarf geckos, belonging to the genus Sphaerodactylus, are found throughout the Caribbean, with eleven species found on the Puerto Rican islands alone. Despite huge diversity and widespread abundance, comprehensive multi-locus phylogenetic studies of this group are largely lacking, or are based on older methods such as allozyme data. As part of a larger study on the phylogenetics of Puerto Rican herpetofauna, a molecular phylogeny of 16S RNA mitochondrial sequence data suggested that a cryptic and potentially new species of the Sphaerodactylus macrolepis complex might inhabit the Virgin Islands to the east of Puerto Rico. To confirm the relationship of this new species to Sphaerodactylus macrolepis sensu lato, we generated additional molecular sequence data for the mitochondrial genes CYTB and ND2, as well as for the nuclear genes RAG, ACM, and CMOS- a total of several thousand base pairs of data across most species of Puerto Rican Sphaerodactylus. Our combined analyses using Bayesian and Maximum Likelihood analyses support recognition of a new species of dwarf gecko from the Virgin Islands distinct from S. macrolepis, which we are in the process of naming. Subsequent studies will determine morphological, behavioral, and phenotypic uniqueness of this species.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 12:00pm - 1:30pm
Sherrill Center Concourse

12:00pm

Constructing A New Phylogenetic Tree To Trace The Evolution Of Ontogenetic Color Change In The Boas (Booidae)
Ontogenetic color change (OCC) in animals is the irreversible change in coloration occurring as an individual matures and develops from a juvenile to an adult. Because coloration is such an important aspect of the ecology, behavior, and natural history of an animal, OCC is often associated with either a shift in habitat use, diet, or sexual maturity. This trait has been observed across many vertebrate taxa from birds to fishes but has not been studied at all in the boas (Reptilia; superfamily Booidae) despite some dramatic known examples of OCC in this group. We compiled a database of all currently-recognized boa species and assessed whether they exhibit OCC or not using evidence from the primary and secondary literature, photographs of different life stages, and information from breeders. We then aligned genetic sequence data from an 1100 basepair mitochondrial gene sequenced across 90% of boa species (including newly-sequenced species never included in a molecular phylogeny before) and constructed a Bayesian phylogeny for the boas. We then mapped the presence of OCC onto the phylogeny as a binary trait using stochastic character mapping and analyzed whether OCC showed phylogenetic signal by performing a Pagel’s λ test. We also reconstructed ancestral character states (whether or not ancestors were likely to have exhibited OCC) and tested whether OCC evolved according to standard evolutionary models. Our results will provide insight into the evolution of OCC in the boas and allow for further research into the selective pressures that precipitated the evolution of this trait, whether this trait has evolved once or a multitude of times, and how it might affect fitness in some species.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 12:00pm - 1:30pm
Sherrill Center Concourse

12:00pm

Fire-Regime Management In Western North Carolina
Records of forest fire disturbance are relatively short (~50-100 years) in many regions across the southeastern United States. For much of the southeast, the historical fire records only cover approximately the past 50 years. Therefore, there is a need to develop proxy records of fire history to better understand the natural variability of fire regimes. This research will attempt to develop proxy fire histories using bog sediment records collected in Western North Carolina in the Southern Appalachian Mountains. Understanding the fire history will help to identify the underlying controls of the local fire regime, and to determine how ecosystems have responded to past changes in climate so that this information can be used to improve land-use and forest management plans in the future. Records of fire activity were determined by analyzing sedimentary macroscopic (>125 µm) charcoal preserved in the sediments of the Panthertown Valley Wetland Complex in Sapphire, NC. The sediment records were dated using 14C dating at Woods Hole - National Ocean Sciences Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (NOSAMS) facility, MA. Analysis of the regions fire histories will inform decision makers about the management of forest resources and guide the use of prescribed fire as a management tool in the region.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 12:00pm - 1:30pm
Sherrill Center Concourse

12:00pm

Method For Isolation Of Vomeronasal-2 Receptors From Vomeronasal Organ Cdna Library For Eventual Expression In Mammalian Cells
The vomeronasal organ (VNO) is a chemosensory organ present in amphibians, reptiles, and non-primate mammals. In mice, vomeronasal neurons express vomeronasal-1 receptors (V1R) or vomeronasal-2 receptors (V2R), both of which are G protein-coupled receptors involved in pheromone detection. V2Rs are expressed by the basal neurons of the VNO. They are of special interest because they are used to detect protein pheromones, the Major Urinary Proteins (MUPs), which induce intermale aggression, female responsiveness to mating, and territory marking behaviors. Because V2Rs use combinatorial coding instead of a labelled line coding strategy, linking pheromone responses to the correct V2R has so far been difficult. We designed primers for each V2R to amplify separate individual sequences from a cDNA library, which could then be transfected into cells using vectors. This cell culture method would allow for deorphanization of V2Rs by creating entire cell populations which only express a single V2R. With V2Rs deorphanized, mapping of pathways can begin from a bottom-up method, instead of the more difficult top-down approach. Here we show how to isolate and clone V2Rs for individual eventual expression in mammalian cells using DNA purification, Zero Blunt TOPO cloning PCR kit and ligation into mammalian vector. V2R 83 was successfully cloned into a bacterial vector with a complete sequence. Phosphatase treatments aided correct insert directionality when the V2R was transferred into mammalian vectors using blunt end cloning. Our results demonstrate progress towards setting up a cell culture based V2Rs expression system. This system will allow for further research to deorphanize individual V2Rs by matching them to their corresponding ligands. Stimulation of V2Rs reproducibly activate specific neural circuits in mouse brains, allowing for reliable study of how external environmental cues can direct behaviors. Cloning V2Rs is the first step to identify receptor-ligand interactions, which can be utilized for future research.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 12:00pm - 1:30pm
Sherrill Center Concourse

12:00pm

Molecular Phylogenetic Identification Of An Enigmatic Tree Frog From Conception Bank, Bahamas
During a 2017 survey of the remote Conception Island Bank, a small toepad sample of an unidentifiable tree frog (Hylide: Osteopilus) was collected by Dr. R. Graham Reynolds. Specimens of Osteopilus from this region appear much larger in size and much more colorful than populations throughout the rest of the Bahamas Archipelago. Due to the morphological ambiguity of the organism, we sought to investigate its phylogenetic affinities in comparison to other geographically proximal Osteopilus species. To do so, we extracted DNA from the toepad tissue of the unknown sample and one known sample of O. septentrionalis from Crooked Island, Bahamas using the Qiagen Wizard SV Kit, tested primers for the 16S mitochondrial gene obtained from a literature search, and then sequenced the sample using PCR. We then aligned the sequence with other Osteopilus species mined from the online resource GenBank and constructed a maximum-likelihood phylogenetic tree of West Indian hylid frogs using the RaxML algorithm in Geneious 10.0®. A BLAST search of the resulting sequence data yielded 98% sequence similarity to a confirmed O. septentrionalis specimen. Our phylogenetic tree revealed that the unknown population on Conception Bank is indeed O. septentrionalis. This raises some interesting questions with regard to the observed unique phenotype of frogs from this island. The large body size and unusual color might be owing to founder effects or local selective pressures. To deepen the mystery, other herpetofauna from the same island also exhibit gigantism- the Brown Anole has the largest body size for the species.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 12:00pm - 1:30pm
Sherrill Center Concourse

12:00pm

Phylogenetic Comparative Analysis Of DNA Methylation Rates In Reptiles
In addition to playing a role in genomic function, DNA methylation influences evolution by regulating transcription. Technological advances, such as High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (RP-HPLC), have allowed scientists to explore genomic regulatory changes that contribute to species diversity and phenotypic variability. Epigenetic modifications of notable interest include 5-methylcytosine (5mC) and CpG (GC), as they are related to neutral selection on the cellular level. To understand how these regulatory changes evolve in a phylogenetic context, we analyzed these quantitative traits phylogenetically by mapping them to a mitochondrial phylogeny inferred de novo across 28 reptile species. Previous studies in reptiles concluded that there was no significant correlation between DNA methylation and environmental stimuli, but these studies did not correct for the non-independence of evolutionarily related species and thus violated a fundamental statistical assumption. To model these traits, we corrected these traits and ran phylogenetic comparative analyses in RStudio®. First, we examined the extent of the phylogenetic non-independence problem by estimating measures of phylogenetic signal for each quantitative trait. We then repeated regressions from a previous study, following phylogenetic correction, and inferred correlation between our two epigenetic modifications. Finally, we fit a series of evolutionary models to examine the evolution of these traits across the reptile phylogeny and selected the best model using an AICc model selection procedure. We found phylogenetic signal in GC but not 5mC, and that phylogenetic correction did not affect results, likely owing to the relatively small number of tips and the lack of phylogenetic signal in one of the traits. The evolution of these traits is best approximated by an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck model, suggesting that local optima exist for these quantitative characters and predicting a loss of phylogenetic signal (convergence or homoplasy). This study is important because the results can be used to understand the modifications to the genome influencing phenotypic diversity.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 12:00pm - 1:30pm
Sherrill Center Concourse

12:00pm

Analysis And Investigation Of Aziridines
This research examined, aziridines and their properties. Although aziridines are structurally similar to Beta-lactams, a broad group of antibiotics, they are more unstable. Investigating aziridines as a modification of Beta-lactams could give more insight into the functionality of Beta-lactams and open up a potential new branch of antibiotics. The Department of Chemistry at the Science University of Tokyo used the Corey-Chayovsky Aziridation Reaction to investigate the enantioselective synthesis of aziridnes from amines and alkyl halides by using camphor-derived chiral sulfide mediator. Thus, demonstrating the aziridation of imines with alkyl bromides with the imino Corey-Chayovsky reaction under the conditions of a chiral sulfide. These findings give more possibilities of modification for the proposed research. The proposed study was to investigate 2-phenyl-1-(3,4,5-trimethoxybenzyl) aziridine. The starting reaction of benzylamine and 3,4,5-trimethoxy benzaldehyde was used to create the imine, (E)-1-phenyl-N-(3,4,5-trimethoxybenzyl) methanimine. After this first reaction, the (E)-1-phenyl-N-(3,4,5-trimethoxybenzyl) methanimine was reacted with a carbene to create 2-phenyl-1-(3,4,5-trimethoxybenzyl) aziridine.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 12:00pm - 1:30pm
Sherrill Center Concourse

12:00pm

Glucuronidation Of 3-Phenoxy Benzoic Acid
3-Phenoxy Benzoic Acid (3-PBA) is a major metabolite of multiple pyrethroids, the active compound in a majority of household insecticides. Pyrethroids act as a neurotoxin and are lethal to many environmentally important insects, can affect aquatic animals such as fish and neurological symptoms and behavioral changes have been seen in mice with developmental exposure to pyrethroids. In vivo metabolism of pyrethroids has not been thoroughly studied in humans, however, animal studies suggest they are commonly metabolized via phase I oxidation and hydrolysis followed by phase II glucuronidation. In this study, the metabolism and inhibition of 3-PBA will be examined using UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) supersomes. 3-PBA undergoes glucuronidation by UGT1A9 and is expected to fit the Michaelis-Menten kinetic model, with known inhibitors of UGT1A9 decreasing enzymatic activity. This will be determined through kinetic data acquired via High Pressure Liquid Chromatography - Ultraviolet detection (HPLC-UV) analysis of enzymatic assays, which incubate the supersomes with 3-PBA and inhibitor. Acquiring this data will aid in improving our understanding of pyrethroid metabolism and any activity the potential inhibitors have on 3-PBA glucuronidation. Inhibitory activity could lead to an increased half-life of this metabolite in vivo, which could result in negative effects on human health.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 12:00pm - 1:30pm
Sherrill Center Concourse

12:00pm

Glucuronidation Of Mono(ethylhexyl)-phthalate, Mono(ethyl-hydroxy-hexyl) phthalate, And Uridine-5'-diphospho-glucuronosyltransferase-1A1 Inhibition Via Over-The-Counter Drugs
Phthalates, a di-substituted benzylic family of chemicals with various industrial applications, is a known androgen disrupter that causes severe defects in sexual development when a fetus is exposed in utero. Despite being regulated in many countries, excluding the United States, most people have a base level of phthalate contamination despite the fact that it is not a naturally occurring chemical. Elimination of phthalates requires a Phase II metabolic pathway called glucuronidation, which varies both in an individual and between individuals. This pathway is aided by enzymes from the family of uridine 5'-diphospho-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs), specifically UGT1A1 and UGT2B7, that allow the environmental toxicants to be excreted via urination. If glucuronidation is inhibited by the common over-the-counter drugs (OTCs) investigated in this study, phthalates would remain in the system for extended periods of time as the primary and more toxic metabolite, exacerbating any harmful side effects of this compound in vivo. Though there are several phthalate derivatives, mono(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP), mono(ethyl-hydro-hexyl) phthalate (MEHHP) and mono(butyl) phthalate (MbP) and their interactions with UGT2B7 were targeted specifically. Enzyme kinetics were determined using the Michaelis-Menten model (Vmax, Km apparent, and Ki) for UGT2B7. Enzyme activity and inhibition was evaluated via biochemical assays using UGT Corning Supersomes™ and UGT Reaction Mix Solutions A & B. The resulting solutions were then analyzed via Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) to determine the levels of glucuronide and substrate.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 12:00pm - 1:30pm
Sherrill Center Concourse

12:00pm

Isolation Of Novel Antibiotic Compounds From Bacteria
Currently there are approximately 17 million death annually from bacterial infections. A large part of this is due to how rapidly antibiotics are becoming ineffective. It is crucial that new antibiotics, and new ways to discover antibiotics, are found before existing treatments are ineffective. In the Wolfe research group we aim to solve this problem through natural product isolation. Four bacteria, designated as 615(unknown), 655(Serratia), 674(Serratia), and 699(unknown), have been found to produce antibiotic compounds in our in-house high throughput screen. Once growth and antibiotic compounds were optimized, the four bacteria were scaled up to 6L. The natural products were separated using liquid-liquid extraction, purified through column chromatography, and identified using IR/NMR/MS.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 12:00pm - 1:30pm
Sherrill Center Concourse

12:00pm

Method Development For Kinetic Analysis Of The Glucuronidation Of Equol
Equol is a nonsteroidal phytoestrogen metabolized by intestinal bacteria from daidzein, an isoflavone found in high concentrations in soy products and other legumes. The ability to produce equol only occurs in 30-50% of humans and has been hypothesized to result in greater health benefits via its affinity to -estrogen receptor. Calibration curves were made to determine lowest levels of detection using HPLC UV-Vis. Concentrations below 1ppm were not detectable and thus required LC/MS/MS. An ongoing time-study was also performed, looking at the stability of equol in a solution of 50% v/v H20/MeOH when left at ambient temperatures. Weekly analysis of a 50ppm concentration was performed using HPLC UV-Vis. The kinetics of the isoflavone daidzein will be studied using assays of recombinant Corning® Supersomes™ enzymes. Both the conjugation and deconjugation of glucuronide to equol are of interest, with various added substrates to determine possible inhibitors. The Michaelis-menten model for kinetics will be followed to measure the results. An understanding of what factors affect the rates of glucuronidation of equol may contribute to our ability to derive more efficacious health benefits.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 12:00pm - 1:30pm
Sherrill Center Concourse

12:00pm

Photodegradation Of Organic Molecules On Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles Surfaces
In recent years, groundwater contamination of organic compounds has become a growing concern. A possible solution to this problem is to degrade these organic molecules into safer molecules using titanium dioxide, TiO2, catalysts. To enlarge the catalytic efficiency by increasing surface area, considerable research has gone into generating TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs). The least researched polymorph of the TiO2 crystal structures is brookite. This research looked into the methods behind synthesizing TiO2 brookite phase NPs. Brookite TiO2 NPs were synthesized using a hydrothermal method and were then characterized using scanning electron microscopy and Powder X-ray Diffraction along with IR Spectroscopy. The synthesized nanoparticles had a fractal style shape and were monodispersed in size. This method was done once showing a possible reproducible method.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 12:00pm - 1:30pm
Sherrill Center Concourse

12:00pm

Phytoestrogen And Sugar Analysis In Endangered Sarracenia rubra Ssp. jonesii Populations
Sarracenia jonesii (mountain sweet pitcher plant) and Sarracenia rubra are endangered pitcher plants found in mountain bogs in western North and South Carolina. Due to their carnivorous diet, pitcher plants often reside in low nutrient, wetland environments, and are susceptible to competition from other, nutrient loving plants. This study will sample Sarracenia jonesii and Sarracenia rubra fluids for sugar levels and phytoestrogen levels in order to assess plant health across different colonies. Phytoestrogens are plant derived phenolic compounds with bioactive properties, as well as roles as secondary metabolites within the plants themselves. Ranging from defense against pathogens, determining plant color, or increasing UV resistance, the wide range of functions displayed by these compounds provides the possibility to utilize them to assess plant health within its environment. This research will observe endangered Sarracenia jonesii pitcher plants by measuring sugar levels within enzymatic fluids, and detecting for measurable levels of phytoestrogens as an indicator of plant stress. Across several colonies within Western North Carolina, comparisons will be made as to what factors contribute to a successful colony of Mountain Sweet pitcher plants.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 12:00pm - 1:30pm
Sherrill Center Concourse

12:00pm

Study Of The Degradation Of Trichloroethylene With Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles
The pollution of different water sources has become an increasing problem over the last few years. This can possibly be counteracted through the use of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticle catalysts. This reactions occurs primarily through photocatalysis. There are three different shapes of TiO2 that are being tested: anatase, rutile, and brookite. Of these three types, brookite is the least known and was the focus of this study. First, a calibration curve had to be created to track the degradation of Trichloroethylene (TCE) using a gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS). This was originally done for anatase and rutile nanoparticles, and compared to existing literature. Then, these results were compared to that of brookite nanoparticles.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 12:00pm - 1:30pm
Sherrill Center Concourse

12:00pm

Substituent Effects Of Carbene-HX Complexes On Binding And Isomerization Energies
Hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) are a class of compounds in use as refrigerants, foam-blowing agents, etc. that are destructive to the environment as greenhouses gases, often with high ozone depletion potential. This research deals with the decomposition of these compounds including decomposition into novel gas-phase carbene complexes that may persist through subsequent isomerizations to alkenes. Substituents were surveyed computationally for their effects on these complexes to identify potential systems in which they have experimental relevance. It was found that donating groups on the carbene and higher polarity on the leaving HX contributed to the strongest binding affinity and lowering of isomerization energy. These findings indicate a direction for which systems may be best suited for experimental study as well as having broader implications in aiding the study of non-covalent interactions in different settings.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 12:00pm - 1:30pm
Sherrill Center Concourse

12:00pm

Synthesis And Antibacterial Evaluation Of Empetroxepin A And B And Related Analogs
The World Health Organization recognizes antimicrobial resistance (AMR) as a global problem caused by the decreasing effectiveness of conventional antibacterial drugs. Estimates are that by 2050, 10 million lives a year would be at risk from drug-resistance infections. The Wolfe research group works to develop novel antibiotics through the isolation, extraction, and characterization of secondary metabolites produced by bacteria, and by leveraging antibiotic scaffolds provided by nature to synthesize and optimize antibacterial activity through medicinal chemistry techniques. Empetroxepin A and B, isolated from the black crowberry tree, Empetrum nigrum L. (Ericaceae), exhibited weak antimycobacterial activity against M. tuberculosis H37Ra (MIC = 100 µg/mL, IC50 =25.7 µg/mL and IC50 = 28.5 µg/mL) and selectivity against human embryonic kidney 293 cells (IC50 45.6 µg/mL and IC50 96.7 µg/mL). Although this activity is modest, sufficient structural similarities exist with known bioactive molecules such as depsidone, flavin, and chalcone, suggesting that activity might be enhanced through modifications to the empetroxepin core. Prior research resulted in a synthetic strategy for both empetroxepin analogs by forming an alkene bridge between a triphenylphosphate salt and a trimethylsilane (TMS) protected salicylaldehyde followed by cyclization using potassium carbonate and a copper oxide catalyst . This research investigates the effect of new ligands to the empetroxepin core by introducing commercially available substituted salicylaldehydes chosen for their influence on steric and electrochemical properties. Each empetroxepin analog will be tested for antibacterial activity against a panel of two Gram-positive (S. aureus and B. subtilis) and two Gram-negative (E. coli and P. aeruginosa) bacteria.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 12:00pm - 1:30pm
Sherrill Center Concourse

12:00pm

Synthesis And Antibiotic Evaluation Of Bedaquiline Analogs That Target ATP Synthase In Escherichia coli
Emergence of drug-resistant bacteria represents a high, unmet medical need, and the added lack of antibacterial agents with novel mechanisms of action only compounds this issue. Gram-negative bacteria, such as Escherichia coli (E. coli), are representative of this need as their treatability is particularly difficult due to the addition of a thick outer membrane and high levels of molecular machinery such as drug efflux pumps to diminish antibacterial activity. ATP synthase has been validated as an antibacterial target in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, where its activity can be specifically blocked by the novel drug, Bedaquiline (BDQ). However, potency of BDQ is restricted to mycobacteria with little or no effect on the growth of other Gram-positive or Gram-negative bacteria. Here, we identify the differences in the ATP synthase amino acid sequence of each pathogen and synthesize analogs of BDQ that target specifically target ATP synthase in E. coli. Using electrophilic aromatic substitutions reactions, a variety of C2 BDQ analogs are being synthesized and evaluated for ATP synthase inhibition using a ATP-driven H+ pumping assay in inside-out membrane vesicles. Development of the diarylquinolines class may represent a promising strategy for combating Gram-negative pathogens.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 12:00pm - 1:30pm
Sherrill Center Concourse

12:00pm

Synthesis Of Novel Carbazole Analogs And Evaluation Of Their Cytotoxicity
Carbazoles are aromatic heterocyclic compounds that contain similar core compound structure and functional groups as Combretastatin A-4 and colchicine which are tubulin-inhibiting anticancer drugs. Tubulin inhibitors function as antimitotic agents by arresting the growth cycle of cancer cells. Carbazoles have exhibited cytotoxicity of cancer cells by the inhibition of DNA topoisomerase II through intercalation of DNA and the formation of covalent adducts. With the application of carbazoles as rather new anticancer drugs, there are opportunities to investigate the effects of various moieties within the drug, namely electron-withdrawing and electron-donating, on the efficiency of cytotoxicity via Methylthiazol Tetrazolium Assay (MTT). The carbazole analogs will be synthesized in a series of steps involving a substitution reaction and an Aldol condensation to yield the 3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl vinyl azide ester. The second ring closure to form the indole will be performed by thermal cyclization of the vinyl azide. Finally, a Wittig reaction followed by 6π electrocyclization will close the third ring where variable nucleophilic aromatic substitutions will occur. These carbazole analogs will have the 3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl group and two biaryl rings of Combretastatin A-4 and colchicine and thus, can be examined for anti-tubulin activity.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 12:00pm - 1:30pm
Sherrill Center Concourse

12:00pm

Synthesis Of β-Lactam Analogues Of CA-4
This research examines the synthesis of β-lactams as combretastatin A-4 (CA-4) analogues and their ability to target and bind to tubulin within cancer cells. Tubulin is an α, β heterodimeric protein and is an important and promising target for cancer research because cell division relies on tubulin and without it, cell division cannot occur. CA-4 is a naturally occurring compound, isolated from the South African bush willow Combretum Caffrum, and is an important molecule to study because CA-4 can bind to tubulin within cells. A problem with CA-4 is that for it to be biologically active it needs to be in the cis conformation but is more stable in the trans conformation. Creating a β-lactam analogue of CA-4 is beneficial because the β-lactam replaces the ethylene bridge in CA-4 and makes the molecule more rigid, keeping it more aligned in the cis conformation. To synthesize the β-lactams, imines will first be synthesized, which will then be reacted with ketenes using a Staudinger [2+2] cycloaddition. The imines will be synthesized with 3,4,5-trimethoxybenzaldehyde and a variety of different anilines. The synthesis of an imine has already been conducted where 3,4,5-trimethoxybenzalehayde was reacted with aniline. The imine was synthesized with quantitative yield. Throughout the project, the substituent on the benzene ring of the aniline will be changed to see if different substituents affect the β-lactams ability to target and bind to tubulin. Specific ketenes will be synthesized from different acid chlorides, based on the desired substituents to be placed in the alpha position of the β-lactam ring.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 12:00pm - 1:30pm
Sherrill Center Concourse

12:00pm

The Importance Of Arginine In The Rotary Mechanism Of F-Type ATP Synthase
The synthesis and hydrolysis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), a biological energy carrier, as performed by F-type ATP synthases is an integral part to life. Structurally, much is known about the enzyme; especially with the recent advancement of high resolution cryo electron microscopy structures. Despite this information, the intricacies of the rotation mechanism occurring between subunits a and c are not fully understood. This rotation is ultimately responsible for utilizing the proton gradient across a membrane to synthesize ATP. Previous research identified specific residues of the c subunit of E. coli F-ATPase that may be necessary for function. The arginine at position 50 appears to be involved in key interactions due to either its steric bulk or its positive charge. This residue is essential to the functionality of the enzyme while running in the ATP hydrolysis direction. The chemical properties have been manipulated via mutagenesis and cysteine modification with methanethiosulfonate to determine which amino acid characteristics are necessary for function. Functionality is being tested using a hydrolysis based proton pumping assay as well as an ATP synthesis assay.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 12:00pm - 1:30pm
Sherrill Center Concourse

12:00pm

Teaching Environmental Issues to Middle School Students in the “In Real Life” Program, Service Learning
In Spring 2018, students in the UNCA Teaching Environmental Issues course worked with Asheville area middle school students participating in the In Real Life (IRL) after-school program to explore topics about the environment and sustainability. The IRL program’s mission aims to engage students in a hands-on learning, after-school experience to explore their interests in different areas. The goals for working with the students included improving ecological literacy, increasing interest in the outdoors, building a relationship between the UNCA class and the IRL students, as well as providing a safe, encouraging, and exciting space for students to learn. The IRL students were assessed on their eco-literacy and interest in the outdoors at the beginning, end, and throughout their time in IRL. The methods used to assess the students were a pre-test during the first meeting, responding weekly to journal prompts, and taking a final assessment at the end of the semester. Students in the IRL program showed improved eco-literacy through an increased knowledge of flora and fauna, clearer definition of outdoor spaces, and improved awareness in sustainability topics as evidenced through several journal entries. The Asheville middle school students met the overall goals set out by both the IRL after-school program as well as the Teaching Environmental Issues course objectives


Tuesday April 24, 2018 12:00pm - 1:30pm
Sherrill Center Concourse

12:00pm

Hemlock Trees: Beauty And Loss Through The Lens Of A Camera
Western North Carolina (WNC) is home to two species of hemlock trees: the eastern hemlock, Tsuga canadensis, and the Carolina hemlock, Tsuga caroliniana. Both species have been detrimentally affected by the invasive hemlock wooly adelgid, Adelges tsugae, which is native to Asia. Many hemlocks in WNC have died or will be dead within the next few years, which will have adverse effects on local forests. My personal relationship with hemlocks extends back to my childhood. During a rainstorm the best place to stay dry was under one of these magnificent trees, where the thick canopy of green needles allowed a little rain or even light to reach the ground. Today, it would be hard if not impossible to find a hemlock healthy enough to serve as any shelter. As a scientist and artist I wanted to document the grandeur of these trees before they disappear from the forests and our everyday consciousness. Science and art are analogous in that both are human constructs we use to define ourselves and the world around us. I photographed hemlocks in the South Toe Valley of Yancey County, NC where I grew up, as this area and these trees have the greatest meaning to me. My photographs depict hemlock trees with the goal of capturing their grandeur and biological intricacy. I want my photographs to serve as both a memory of these species and a lesson reflecting on their loss.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 12:00pm - 1:30pm
Sherrill Center Concourse

12:00pm

Mineralogical Study Of Biotite In Metapelites From Mount Mitchell State Park, North Carolina, United States Of America
The purpose of this research project is to analyze rock samples from Mount Mitchell, North Carolina and determine the chemistry of biotite minerals within, specifically for titanium content. A previous study at Mount Mitchell by Coburn (2016) has shown that a few samples collected from this study contained biotite with and without titanium in the same rock. This gives us two different compositions of biotite coexisting within a rock, suggesting two different crystallization events. The samples will be analyzed at UNCA utilizing the methods of Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) on the Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) as well as observing optical properties through the Polarized Light Microscope (PLM). After being analyzed at UNCA, the most optimal samples will be shipped to Spectrum Petrographics to be prepared as thin sections. Much of the current information about the geology in this region is outdated and by completing this research project a better understanding of the geology at Mount Mitchell will be achieved. Acquiring the precise chemical composition data of the biotite found in these rocks aids in constraining the temperature and pressure range for the metamorphism of the rocks and the formation of the biotite. This information will allow the geologic history of Mount Mitchell to be placed in context with surrounding geology and related studies.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 12:00pm - 1:30pm
Sherrill Center Concourse

12:00pm

The Beaucatcher Road Cut, Asheville, NC: New Constraints On Shearing Within The Ashe Metamorphic Suite
The Ashe Metamorphic Suite (AMS), composed of schist, gneiss, and amphibolite is found in the Blue Ridge Mountains and was thrust onto ~1 Ga Grenville basement gneiss during the Ordovician Taconic orogeny. The Taconic was followed by strike-slip faulting during the Silurian-Devonian Acadian orogeny and then thrusting during the Paleozoic Alleghanian orogeny. The Beaucatcher Cut is located along Interstate 240 in Asheville, North Carolina and exposes the AMS which exhibits abundant deformation. The cut provides a detailed view of the rock layers and folds in the AMS, within an undocumented shear zone within the interior of a large scale fold that contains many shear sense indicators. Detailed field mapping and interpretation of shear sense recorded in the rocks were combined to evaluate which orogeny the shearing relates to. The strike is consistently northeast and the dip varies throughout the cut. On the east, the dip is 24° east and progresses to vertical toward the west. The plunge of the mineral stretching lineation also varies throughout the cut, most are greater than 12° towards the northwest indicating mostly thrust motion. Three of the samples were right lateral, or dextral, which indicates a strike-slip fault, while five samples indicated a thrust fault along with dextral movement. The Beaucatcher Cut most likely supports the Taconic Orogeny due to the majority of the lineations plunging more than 20°, which is not documented with Acadian deformation. Alleghanian thrusting has been recorded at temperatures of

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 12:00pm - 1:30pm
Sherrill Center Concourse

12:00pm

Measuring Galaxy Morphologies In HST Infrared Images
This research studies the evolution of galactic winds by correlating the properties of galaxies with the gas content of their extended halos. Given our current understanding of galactic winds, metal-rich gas should be driven from spiral galaxies in winds arising perpendicular to the disk. By taking advantage of the luminosity and stable spectrum of quasars, we can identify absorption lines from metal-rich gas in these extended halos of galaxies in the foreground of a quasar. Infrared images from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) were critical to achieving the sensitivity and resolution that are required to study the morphologies and star formation rates of high redshift galaxies. Accurate morphological measurements were made to examine the distribution of gas around galaxies, and to test whether the shape and extent of galaxy outflows around star-forming galaxies evolves over time.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 12:00pm - 1:30pm
Sherrill Center Concourse

1:00pm

Robert Frank’s The Americans: Examining the Meta-pictorial Frame
This paper will examine embedded compositional frames in photographer Robert Frank's The Americans (1955-1957) as meta-pictorial and self-reflexive tools that combine mediality, compositional isolation and visual ellipsis in order to expose the fallacies of mid-century American idealism. Frank is often considered one of the most influential photographers of the twentieth century, yet current analysis of his framing focuses on his use of the frame merely as a compositional choice. Rather than suggesting that Robert Frank’s use of the frame is derived heavily from the work of his mentor Walker Evans; the scholarship of Jacques Derrida, Victor Stoichitā and Péter Bokody will be used as frameworks for discussing the narrative implications of the frames in The Americans as forms of the meta-pictorial frame. By analyzing Frank’s photo-series The Americans, this paper will aim to establish his use of the meta-pictorial frame as a distinctive tool for illuminating social alienation and a false-sense of freedom in America’s nuclear era.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 1:00pm - 1:20pm
237 Owen Hall

1:00pm

DWARP: A Data Driven Radio Propagation Analysis Tool
Radio propagation is the science of how effectively radio waves travel across different mediums to go from source to destination. Radio propagation is often difficult to understand and predict. It can be very spontaneous and localized. Variables such as solar indexes and geomagnetic fields can help provide a base-line idea, but often fail to provide detailed, location-specific propagation data. Introducing D-WARP: D-WARP, or Detailed WSPR Analysis of Radio Propagation is a computer controlled radio receiving system that utilizes Software Defined Radio to continuously capture, log, and analyze traffic from the WSPR system of digital radio beacons in order to provide a more detailed and localized picture of radio propagation trends. In this presentation, we will discuss how the D-WARP system works, and how it can help aid in the understanding of radio propagation through its data analysis algorithms.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 1:00pm - 1:20pm
125 Rhoades Robinson Hall

1:00pm

Which Craft To Choose? A Brand Loyalty Study Of Craft Beer Consumers
Craft brewing in the United States has seen unprecedented growth over the past two decades. New and established breweries must uncover sales practices and marketing techniques that will allow them to compete in an increasingly crowded market. Asheville, North Carolina provides an exceptional opportunity to study consumer preferences for craft beer and brewery brand loyalty. With over 20 craft breweries in the city and over 60 in the region, Asheville, named Beer City USA four times, has both an extremely competitive environment for breweries and a savvy group of beer consumers who have developed distinct preferences. This research tests brand loyalty (whether or not one has switched brands over the past six months) as a function of several characteristics including consumer demographics, involvement in the industry, satisfaction with brewery products and experiences, convenience, price, concern for the environment, and other factors. In this study, Asheville beer consumers are surveyed to document their preferences for craft breweries and identify whether they successfully identify brand messaging of individual breweries. Frequency of purchases, beer consumption type and variance, other behavioral and expenditure characteristics, and factors that may influence consumers’ loyalty to a particular brewery are identified by this study. The results demonstrate both the depth of consumer awareness about the local craft beer scene and the factors that influence craft brewery brand loyalty. Individual craft breweries and brewer's associations can use these results to enhance their understanding of craft beer consumers, improve the efficacy of brewery and beer tourism marketing efforts, and refine business strategy in an increasingly competitive market.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 1:00pm - 1:20pm
035 Karpen Hall

1:00pm

Criticizing P.G. Wodehouse: A Reconsideration Of The "Performing Flea”
During the 20th century, British novelist and humorist Sir Pelham Grenville Wodehouse (P.G. Wodehouse) attained tremendous popularity both in Great Britain and America. Even today, his characters Psmith, Jeeves, and Bertie Wooster are recognizable and oft-quoted. Wodehouse’s work, however, is rarely a popular topic of discussion in critical circles. His contemporaries, specifically, afford Wodehouse very little serious critical attention. And while noted authors and critics such as George Orwell are lavish in their praise of Wodehouse’s technical abilities as a writer, most fail to acknowledge Wodehouse as socially or culturally relevant. What was it about Wodehouse’s work that so bothered the earliest critics? My essay contextualizes this antagonistic posture within the 20th-century academic discourse on the “culture industry,” a body of criticism which discusses the detrimental effects of mass-produced (and implicitly popular) media on the society which consumes it. Many participants in the culture industry discussion espouse a notion that the purpose of popular media is to perpetuate and further solidify the influence of the wealthy elite over the masses. These critics argue that the output of the culture industry serves to protect a “status quo.” Using the Wooster novels—Wodehouse’s most popular series—I counter that popular authors, like their highbrow counterparts, challenge societal values and institutions effectively, if not overtly. Specifically, my essay looks at Wodehouse’s commentary on feminism and class toward an understanding of how popular authors appease their readers while simultaneously challenging their deepest beliefs.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 1:00pm - 1:20pm
232 Karpen Hall

1:00pm

How Biodiversity Loss Affects Humans & Why The Media Don’t Talk About It
Biodiversity loss can be just as detrimental to humans and the environment as climate change, but this topic appears to attract less media attention. Research has shown that humans benefit greatly from biodiversity in the form of ecosystem services, which can include pollination from bees and other insects and forests preventing erosion. This study examines media coverage of biodiversity loss among two U.S. newspapers with the largest circulation, the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal. Through contrast and comparison of newspaper coverage from the past 5 years, this study seeks to better understand how biodiversity loss is framed in the media.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 1:00pm - 1:20pm
316 Karpen Hall

1:00pm

Assessing The Muscle Activity In Hip Abductors And Hip Flexor Muscles During Various Exercises
The purpose of this study is to assess how various exercises generate muscle activity in the hip abductor and hip flexor muscles. We are recruiting healthy subjects above the age of 18 to participate in this study. Participants will complete a demographic questionnaire and will be asked to perform 12 exercises, three times while muscle activity is recorded. These exercises include: bridge, mountain climber, rope/elastic band clam flexors, TRX lateral balance lunge with rotation, TRX single leg hinge with rotation, TRX rear foot elevated foot lunge, lateral band walk, side-lying wall, single-leg forward reach, skater hop, side plank leg raise, and hip drops. Participants will be fitted with surface electromyographic (EMG) equipment to measure their muscle activity. Their body fat and lean mass will be measured using a dual energy x-ray absorptiometer (iDXA) scan. This information will be useful for developing exercise routines to prevent falls in older adults.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 1:00pm - 1:20pm
406 Sherrill Center

1:00pm

The Impact Of The Tourism Economy On The Regional Identity Of Appalachia
In my presentation, I will demonstrate the economic and social problems that the tourism industry brings to the Appalachian region. The tourist economy is unsustainable and overtakes the ability of a community to form and define its own identity. These problems are directly related to the stereotypes, both positive and negative, that the tourism economy encourages and developed, as well as the relation of the tourism industry in Appalachia to the long standing economic exploitation of the region and the institutions of white supremacy. I have conducted research into both the history of tourism in the Appalachian mountain region as well as researched the contemporary state of tourism in the area. These two factors are intertwined and together, show a history of exploitation and stereotyping that has contributed to the systematic exploitation of the region by industrial outsiders. Through my research, a pattern can be found of outside influence shaping both the politics and the socioeconomic relations of Appalachia to the broader United States, in addition to a history of exploitation, enslavement, and the whitewashing of a rich culture to format a more desirable tourist image of the region and its inhabitants. By the end, I will conclusively show that Appalachian communities must work to build a sustainable economy that is not dependent on tourism and use this self-sufficiency to create a truer sense of regional identity, outside the confines of the stereotypes that have encouraged in the mainstream American consciousness. The tourism industry is not sustainable and has only negative effects on the region as a whole.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 1:00pm - 1:20pm
012 Karpen Hall

1:00pm

A Liberal Mystique: Pragmatist Reflections On Contemporary American Life
Individual Americans are growing more atomistic every year. Recent studies have suggested that emerging adults - the next generation of citizens - are adopting moral individualism in a society that structurally prevents participatory citizenship. At the same time, political science research reports that social capital is in decline in the United States. This problem has been talked about by many, but scholars have failed to organize this social ennui under a single name. Nonetheless, the problem is ubiquitous: American society fails to maintain an engaged, caring populace and has suffered greatly because of it. American endoxa tend to value individualism, specialization, and marketability as virtues. The marriage of individualistic neoliberal social and political thought with postmodernism’s skeptical constructivism has produced a static citizenry. Drawing on an interdisciplinary set of texts in social and political thought, this paper weaves a narrative that identifies their shared thematic concerns. I appraise and offer insight into formal and informal public institutions by employing a pragmatist framework. In renewing dedication to inclusive, deliberative, and expressive democratic ideals, we may - as Richard Rorty said and James Baldwin before him - achieve our country.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 1:00pm - 1:20pm
236 Zageir Hall

1:20pm

A Greek Mystery at Biltmore Estate: Identifying the “Heroic Female Figures” of the Library Fireplace
This paper will attempt to conclusively identify the “two heroic female figure” sculptures on the library fireplace in the Biltmore Estate in Asheville, North Carolina as either Hestia and Demeter, Aeternitas and Eve, or Urania and Hygieia through the use of visual and textual comparisons. Prior to this exploration, there has been no thorough investigation of these sculptures or their significance to each other and their context, either from scholars or the internal research team of the estate. This missing informational gap stems from a lack of firsthand identification by both the head architect, Richard Morris Hunt, who drafted designs for the entirety of sculpture used in the home, and the sculptor, Karl Bitter. Although there are no primary acknowledgements of these two figures, this research paper hopes to draw connections between the two figures and the larger library as a location for the acquisition of knowledge. It will thoroughly delve into the historical context of these artworks, as well as provide in-depth descriptions of each pairing, utilizing site specific research on the Biltmore Estate through firsthand analysis of the sculptures; comparing them to Classical depictions to confirm or disprove these identifications. The works of Victoria Volk, John Bryan, Mike Dixon-Kennedy, John M. Steadman, Warwick Wroth, and H. B. Walters, and their descriptions of these figures will be examined to understand the allegorical relationships between these women and their location by discussing their Classical significance, their relevance in Victorian era America, and their function in the Biltmore library.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 1:20pm - 1:40pm
237 Owen Hall

1:20pm

Data Driven Light Based Artwork
In this work we produced a light-based artwork that translates live space weather data into a visually pleasing format. Much of the raw data is represented in a format that would be meaningless to a viewer unfamiliar with the study of space weather. In presenting this data as an artistic piece, we increase the time the audience will dedicate to thoroughly and critically examining the data. Through this work, we allow the viewer to engage with the data in a way that they can understand without previous familiarity. We achieved this by using Arduino hardware and software to scrape data from the NOAA livestream and translate it into a more visual experience.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 1:20pm - 1:40pm
125 Rhoades Robinson Hall

1:20pm

A Travel Cost Analysis Of A Kids In Parks TRACK Trail
There are a plethora of hiking trails spread throughout the nation with unique features, however, TRACK Trails are unique. TRACK Trails specially enhanced trail which offers an easy difficulty level with a family friendly approach and self-guided materials designed to make the experience more enriching and educational. These trails came about after the creation of the Kids in Parks program in 2008 and are a direct result of their efforts to improve the health of children and the health of our nation’s parks. TRACK Trails are unique in that there has not been a large number of studies conducted on them compared to other public trails. This research estimates the recreational value associated with a TRACK Trail, as well as the potential economic impact consumers of a trail may have on a region. In order to determine the value of a TRACK Trail, revealed preference theory and the travel cost method will be used to determine a consumer’s desire for the trail by treating their travel costs as an entrance fee. TRACK Trails have construction costs as well as a small yearly fee associated with their maintenance and this research will determine whether or not the value of a trail exceeds its initial cost. This information would be important for areas considering whether or not installing one of these specially enhanced trails is beneficial to their community.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 1:20pm - 1:40pm
035 Karpen Hall

1:20pm

The Struggle To Survive And Thrive In Emma Donoghue’s ROOM
In her 2010 psychological novel ROOM, Canadian-Irish author Emma Donoghue utilizes a child narrator to reveal the psychological complexities of trauma and recovery. ROOM tells the story of five-year-old Jack, along with his mother “Ma,” who is being held captive in an outbuilding by a man only referred to as Old Nick. Donoghue considers the role gender in the novel in conjunction with the difference between what Jack learns throughout his journey about life outside of Room and what readers learn through Jack about the duo’s despondent circumstances. Through depth of tragedy and the various elements that allow Jack to flourish but also inhibit his healthy growth, ROOM lends itself to various psychological readings that focus on the process of healing. The purpose of this paper is to explore how Jack’s wide-eyed innocence and curiosity about the outside world he knows nothing about affects his psychological, physical, and emotional development. It will also pinpoint the various characteristics of psychological literature, referencing psychoanalyst Dr. Esther Rashkin and other genre specialists to compare ROOM to texts of similar topics.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 1:20pm - 1:40pm
232 Karpen Hall

1:20pm

Asheville’s Built Environment and its Influence on Local Communities
The built environment consists of all man-made constructs outside of earth’s natural environment. This study is an analysis of the methods used by the North Carolina Department of Transportation in comparison with community based non-profit organizations when communicating the impact Asheville’s built environment and increasing construction has on local communities. This study will seek to find what information local Asheville communities are being given, if this information is beneficial or harmful to the overall livability of the community and if there is any middle ground or balance that can be reached. Methods used are interviews with members of the Burton Street Community, those participating in the I-26 ConnectUs Project at Mountain True and the Executive Director of the Asheville Design Center. These interviews were analyzed for the best practices and outcomes within the city of Asheville and its local environment. This study allows an in depth look at Asheville’s local communities, their environments and how certain organizations communicate change.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 1:20pm - 1:40pm
316 Karpen Hall

1:20pm

Cultural Competence In Improving Food Access In Immigrant Communities
I am reviewing the most culturally competent approaches to improving food access in immigrant communities. The goal of this research is to identify the purchasing, cooking and dietary choices, as well as to recognize the most advantageous approaches to improving food access, in ways that are appropriate for these populations. Food is at the heart of identity for people around the world. Our country also has a precedent set as a melting pot of cultures and identities. Our immigrant population is steadily increasing every year; the US Census anticipates, that within the next 25 years, population growth will result in over half of our population identifying as non-white, and that by 2060, 20% of Americans will be born outside of the country. In order to accommodate this population, we need to find new approaches to improving food access in immigrant communities. The “food desert” metric measures distance between supermarkets, which are a characteristically Western means of interacting with food. People of Latin, Asian and other backgrounds have dietary lifestyles that cannot be (nutritiously) accommodated by the selection in the average supermarket. Supermarkets perpetuate the Standard American Diet, which is associated with higher risk for heart disease, diabetes and obesity. Ethnic food markets have the capacity to bridge the gaps in food access for these communities. In the Asheville area, we are collecting data on the availability of fresh fruits and vegetables at Ethnic Food Markets. This will help to gain perspective on what is available regionally for nutrient dense options, as well as where opportunities lie for improvement.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 1:20pm - 1:40pm
406 Sherrill Center

1:20pm

Relationship Between Cognitive Abilities And Drug Use
The purpose of my research is to demonstrate the relationship between high childhood IQ scores and the use of drugs and alcohol later in life. Further, the factors that may contribute to this relationship and the degree to which these factors have an effect (i.e. childhood socioeconomic status, family mismanagement, parental substance use and association with substance using peers). This research reviews longitudinal studies beginning in adolescence and persisting through adulthood, with cognitive assessments taken during childhood and their relationship with the individual’s alcohol and drug dependency later in life. In order to compile and translate the researcher’s methodology, my research will analyze the use of various measures, including: lifetime cannabis and cocaine use, parental social class and psychological distress during adolescence; cannabis, cocaine, amphetamine, ecstasy and polydrug use in the past 12 months; and social class, educational attainment and gross monthly income at 30 years. For example, one study found that IQ scores at 5 years old were positively associated with cannabis and cocaine use in women and also positively associated with amphetamines, ecstasy, and poly-drug use in men during adulthood. A positive correlation was also found with IQ scores at 10 years and drug use during adulthood. Thus, I hypothesize that there will be a positive correlation between higher IQ score measurements in youth, adolescents, pre-teens and an increased association with and likelihood of drug use in teen and young adulthood. In addition, I hypothesize these associations will be found to be stronger in women than in men. However, my research remain independent from any pre-existing conditions, such as psychological distress in adolescence and life-course socioeconomic position. In conclusion, high childhood cognitive abilities may increase the chance that an individual will use illegal drugs in adolescence and adulthood.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 1:20pm - 1:40pm
012 Karpen Hall

1:20pm

My Business Ethics Brings All The Consumers To The Yard: Analyzing The Existence Of Ethical Corporations Under Capitalism
Most Americans are active participants in corporate capitalism so it is important that we as employees and consumers are attempting to make ethical choices in how we participate in capitalism. Within the current United States capitalist economy it is difficult to define ethics in terms of large scale corporations. The pre-existing formulas for corporate ethics in circulation, while extensive, are inaccessible to the average person and do not consider environmental or community factors. A new model must be built to define what ‘ethical corporations’ would consist of. How can we as participants in corporate capitalism find out for ourselves which corporations we should patron to do the least cultural damage? This paper intends to build a ethical checklist model using current working models for ethical capitalism and business ethics. The checklist model is intended to be used by the average person in order to identify where a corporation in lacking and what they are doing well in way of providing for the community, providing for their stakeholders, and caring their environmental impact. To prove the model works fifteen large scale corporations will be tested with the checklist and assessed for their ethical standing.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 1:20pm - 1:40pm
236 Zageir Hall

1:40pm

The Clipper
Competitive gaming is a massive industry, with enormous prize pots, tournament attendance numbers, stream viewerships, and sponsorships. As popular games evolve players rely increasingly on video analysis of their matches in order to improve their strategies and study their opponents. This is easy for top players because their matches are broadcast on the tournament’s stream and uploaded to YouTube. For lesser-known players there is no guarantee that they will be recorded, removing a valuable tool for low and mid-level players. For these players, there are currently two ways to record their matches: end up on the tournament’s stream by happenstance or record the match on a phone camera. These are both poor solutions as one is unreliable and the other produces low-quality videos subject to blurring, crowd interference, and shaky camera operation. Twitch.tv, the streaming service where most gaming streams are broadcast has a “Clip” feature which allows viewers to download segments of streams in real time. The Clipper is a real-world analog to this Clip feature in the form of a portable device that records HD video directly from HDMI and component signals. The goal of this project is to facilitate self-reliance for players who want high-quality recordings of their matches, as well as to help players improve and share their matches with other players. The Clipper is operated by connecting the input source, checking the status screen for the go-ahead, and pressing the start and stop buttons to create recordings which will be stored on a removable USB drive. The device is built with a raspberry-pi, a video capture card, an SD card, a USB drive, and software to create and store video files directly from a gaming setup.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 1:40pm - 2:00pm
125 Rhoades Robinson Hall

1:40pm

Alcohol and Tobacco Consumption: Effects on Wages in the Food and Beverage Service industry of Asheville, North Carolina 
Wages in the service industry vary widely based on position and portion of income that is tip-reliant. Beyond this, wages are based on personal characteristics, such as work ethic, habits, and communication skills, especially within the pool of tipped workers. This study provides insights into the question of the influence that alcohol and tobacco have on the average hourly wages in the service industry. A hedonic wage study uses survey research to uncover bias and endogenize habitual consumption of tobacco and alcohol. More specifically, a regression is used to measure the impact of tobacco and alcohol on the average hourly wages (including tips) in the Food and Beverage sector of the service industry in Asheville, North Carolina. In order to perform an analysis a wage function of variables that involve the following key characteristics of employees in the food and beverage service industry is used: tobacco usage (including smokeless tobacco), average number of drinks per week, average tip percentage (if a tipped wage), average hours worked weekly, average hours of sleep per night, perceived job satisfaction, and continuing education or not. The data has been collected from a survey distributed to a sample population via social media, asking questions targeting the key variables along with other endogenous vectors that are included to avoid bias. Results support significant correlations between tobacco and alcohol consumption and income. Tobacco has shown to have a negative influence on wages, while alcohol proves to positively influence income. Implications of this study’s findings may influence the actions of tipped individuals in regards to their actions and usage of tobacco and alcohol both inside and outside of the workplace.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 1:40pm - 2:00pm
035 Karpen Hall

1:40pm

Stepping Into The Right Picture: Developing Personal Vision In Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre
Critics have long noticed Charlotte Bronte’s protagonist, Jane Eyre, for exhibiting a stellar sense of agency as the writer of her own story. The novel uses the realistic genre of autobiography for framing its fiction. By doing this, Bronte invites readers to identify with Jane’s story as a real tale of trial and triumph. Opinions regarding this triumph have centered on Jane’s desire for equality and how she achieves this by modeling others, seeking vocation, creating a personal view of religion, and wielding conversation. Less discussed is the way Jane views her surroundings through the lens of art and books. As both a reader and a visual artist, the themes of sight develop in this character leading to a strong sense of self and an equally strong picture of the world she wants to inhabit. These standards allow her to resist attempts by patriarchal constructs to subjugate her. Rather than use force or manipulation to alter undesirable situations; she leaves them. Like the paintings she renders, Jane forms her own views of spirituality, justice, equality, and morality. With her mind’s eye she learns to recognize the best picture of what is right and steps into these frames. Not only does Jane’s example provide a vision for Victorian women to rise above the constraints of that era, but her example gives all generations a model for creating and adhering to a personal vision.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 1:40pm - 2:00pm
232 Karpen Hall

1:40pm

The Framing Of Kudzu In National And Local Newspapers
This paper analyzes the framing of Kudzu, a quick growing Asian climbing plant, by national and local newspapers. This invasive species has tormented the southeastern United States for decades but was once hailed as a hero for prevention of soil erosion. This study will examine articles from the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, and the Asheville Citizen-Times from 1950 and 2017 in order to better understand the historical framing of Kudzu and any recent changes in framing. This paper seeks to better understand how media have played a role in communicating the environmental benefits and consequences of an invasive species.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 1:40pm - 2:00pm
316 Karpen Hall

1:40pm

Biodiversity Of TA In WNC
The primary objectives were to describe patterns of community composition of testate amoeba (TA), to develop hypotheses to explain differences within the communities, and to determine if taxa occupy similar ecological niches with respect to substrate moisture, total elemental C and N, and pH. TA are a diverse polyphyletic group of shelled protozoans that dominate Sphagnum peatlands. TA have been used as proxies for water quality, environmental acidity, and land use changes globally, however little work has been done using these microorganisms in the southeastern U.S. This research will provide data to aid in the analysis of long term studies evaluating environmental and climatic changes in the fen during the Holocene. Sphagnum peat moss and soil were sampled from hiking trail and non-trail sites within Panthertown valley of Nantahala forest during the fall of 2016, and Franklin bog in spring of 2017. Non-trail sites represent pristine sites and trail sites represent disturbed sites determined by their respective qualitative level of trampling. The categories were compared to look for correlations between anthropogenic disturbance and the residential TA population assemblages. The methods include qualitative and quantitative analysis for each sample; moisture class, water table depth, pH, total elemental carbon/nitrogen content, as well as TA identification. TA processing followed standard wash and filtration preparation protocol. Statistical analysis included, Shannon’s diversity index to determine the biodiversity of each sample, multivariate ordinations to compare species and environmental variables. Panthertown had high TA biodiversity and statistics indicated that populations were dynamic and changing. Environmental stresses due to drought may have caused variation in species richness.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 1:40pm - 2:00pm
014 Zeis Hall

1:40pm

Ethnic Food Landscape in Asheville
Ethnic food markets or ethnic food stores (defined as one that meets two of the three criteria, (a) ethnic name (b) prominently displayed ethnic symbols and/or (c) noticeably high presence of diverse food items associated with a particular ethnic cuisine) are often overlooked by food surveys nationwide. Research on healthy food access often focus on supermarkets/chain companies and their role in healthy eating, however, ethnic food markets are invaluable in that they provide healthy produce and products that are culturally acceptable to their target populations. In our research project, Ethnic Food Landscape in Asheville, we will investigate what the ethnic food market landscape in Asheville looks like overall, and whether the landscape is wide spread through the city or concentrated in a certain area. This research is led by Professor Jennifer Sanchez-Flack, and includes Harper Gande, Anniina Hirvonen, Joceline Rosas, and Leah Fagan in the Health and Wellness Promotion 499 undergraduate research course. Along with this research we will be surveying the fresh produce offered at these food stores, looking at both quantity and price of produce. This research will allow us to see whether or not the produce is affordable, readily available, and the variety of produce in the store. We will organize the data we find and create a clear and concise set for others to access.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 1:40pm - 2:00pm
406 Sherrill Center

1:40pm

Sigra: A Dungeons And Dragons Module
In this presentation I will describe the results of the construction of a campaign guide for Dungeons and Dragons Fifth Edition. This guide contains the worldstate, history, regions and people of Sigra which is the namesake of the guide. Sigra is a land that has been under an eclipse that has somehow lasted one thousand years. Through the use of this book, Dungeon Masters will be able to run adventures for their players through the use of setting description and suggested plotlines. The guide is by no means a strict rulebook and is intended for easy modification and encourage world exploration. The guide utilizes a structured, informative format with occasional use of narrative segments. It also contains gameplay mechanics for new aspects introduced. Campaign guides function as a vehicle of blurring the lines between narrative fiction and gameplay.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 1:40pm - 2:00pm
012 Karpen Hall

1:40pm

Flying Under The Gaydar: How Femme Queer Women Navigate Visibility, Identity, And Partnerships
The relationship between sexuality and identity plays a vital role in LGBTQ+ wellbeing. The gender and sexual expression of queer individuals leads to diverse representations of sexuality. Often adopting a role or identity within the queer community can create a sense of visibility or acceptance for an individual. However, while these forms of personal expression can be empowering for members of the queer community, the identities of individuals within interpersonal relationships can impact one another. At times the identity of one partner may shift, leading to adaptations in the personal identities of everyone in the partnership. Past studies have found that femme queer women prioritize their sexual identity as an aspect of themselves and often feel that they must maintain certain labels in order for their identities to be seen as valid by both heterosexual and queer communities, even when their identities come at the expense of respecting their partner’s identity. However, research has also shown that femme queer women prioritize their partner’s identity, appearance, and financial standing less than heterosexual women (Fahs and Swank 2013). This study will use snowball sampling and person-to-person solicitation to interview self-identified femme queer women and explore how their identities impact how they relate to not only themselves, but their partners; this research seeks to examine the power dynamics and intimacy present in queer relationships and how those factors relate to femme identity in the queer community. Findings suggest that femme queer women approach their relationships from a perspective that prioritizes their femme identity and carve their space in their communities accordingly.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 1:40pm - 2:00pm
236 Zageir Hall

2:00pm

Synthesis And Antibacterial Evaluation Of Core α-Pyrone Pseudopyronine A Analogs
With antibiotic resistance becoming an increasing problem in society, it is vital for chemists to search for novel antibacterial agents to combat this growing issue. α-Pyrones have been a known class of antibiotic natural products since 1983 that have been studied previously, and have been shown to be viable candidates for new research into other natural product α-Pyrones, including pseudopyronine A. α-Pyrone analogs of Pseudopyronine A, a natural product isolated from Pseudomonas species of bacteria, are being synthesized and evaluated for improved antibacterial activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Synthetic analogs are accessed through either the commercially available acyl chlorides or β-ketoesters, which will produce the α-pyrone in 5 or 3 steps respectively. The α-pyrones will then be further derivatized through several processes including thiol substitution, methylation, alkylation, amidation, or halogenation reactions. All derivatives will then be evaluated for antibacterial activity in a growth inhibition assay against a panel of both Gram-positive and -negative bacteria.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 2:00pm - 2:20pm
123 Zeis Hall

2:00pm

Unimolecular decomposition of CF3CHClCCl2 radicals chemically activated by the reaction of TCE and CF3 radicals.
Unimolecular decomposition of CF3CHClCCl2 radicals chemically activated by the reaction of TCE and CF3 radicals.

Pagnareach Tin
Dr. Bert Holmes
The Department of Chemistry at University of North Carolina Asheville

Abstract
Trichloroethylene (CHCl=CCl2) or TCE was widely used in the chemical industry due to its versatility and properties. The most common use for TCE is as a degreaser agent. Factories that produce products such as hearing aids used TCE to degrease metal components that were used in the production of hearing aids. Ever since TCE was banned by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) due to its carcinogenic properties, tons of TCE in used remained in the environment. A reaction between TCE and CF3 radicals was studied in order to determine possible pathways that TCE can react to form various products. Photolysis of CF3I was the source of CF3 radicals that subsequently added to the CHCl end of TCE producing chemically activated CF3CHClCCl2 radicals in the gas phase. The addition of CF3 radicals to the CCl2 end of TCE would produce CF3CCl2CHCl radicals, but quantum chemical calculations using Gaussian verified that this reaction was not important, in agreement with experimental findings. The chemically activated CF3CHClCCl2 radical decomposed by loss of atomic Cl to form CF3CH=CCl2 or was stabilized by collision with reactant molecules. The stabilized CF3CHClCCl2 radical combined with CF3 radicals yielding CF3CHClCCl2CF3. The atomic Cl added to TCE forming the CHCl2CCl2 radical that subsequently combined with CF3 radicals producing CHCl2CCl2CF3. Gas chromatography and mass spectra analysis were used to determine products that were formed in the reaction vessel. Three main products that formed were positively determined to be CF3CHClCCl2CF3, CF3CH=CCl2, and CF3CCl2CHCl2. Future studies include determining reaction pathway and characterizing final products of the reaction between CFCl=CFCl and CF3 radicals as well as trans-CHCl=CClCF3 and CF3 radicals.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 2:00pm - 2:20pm
202 Zeis Hall

2:00pm

Gungi: Bring a Fictional Board Game to Life
Gungi is a fictional, two-player strategy board game that is played by the citizens of East Gorteau and other major characters in Hunter x Hunter—a Japanese comic and animated series written by Yoshihiro Togashi. Despite the popularity of the series and the existence of Gungi for nearly a decade, Yoshihiro Togashi has yet to release an official ruleset let alone a physical adaptation of the board game. This project introduces a Windows application of Gungi that remains as true to the source material as possible—both graphically and functionally —while striking a balance between accessibility and competitiveness. Like the game presented in the fictional series, this application is a strategy board game for two players, similar to chess or shogi, with a unique use of the third-dimension. This mechanic allows players to stack their pieces on any other pieces (including the opposing player’s) and form towers. The added dimensionality along with other uncommon features, such as player-decided starting placements and placing pieces into play mid-match, provides players with a multitude of strategies to checkmate the opposing Marshall (King) or defend their own. To appeal to a broad audience—especially those outside of the series’ fanbase—this application provides an interactive tutorial to demonstrate the rules and general strategy of the game. The application also integrates hover boxes and tooltips into the user interface to assist the player in their decision-making process. The final product aims to exemplify a nonintrusive and intuitive environment and the standard platform for playing Gungi.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 2:00pm - 2:20pm
125 Rhoades Robinson Hall

2:00pm

OPEC's Response To Individual Member Country Production Shocks
Many recognize the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) as a cartel for its behavior in manipulating oil prices through production. Cartel theory states that members of the cartel do not change their production levels if a member experiences a production shock, or a sharp decrease in production caused by an outside event. This paper examines evidence that suggests that OPEC is a cartel based on those shocks and their production data. The analysis focuses on the Iranian Revolution, the Persian Gulf War, and the Venezuelan Oil Strike which caused a sharp decrease in OPEC’s oil production, specifically in Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, and Venezuela. When one of the member countries experiences a shock, then there is a significant change in production by OPEC, however the magnitude is small in comparison to the total amount of oil produced.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 2:00pm - 2:20pm
035 Karpen Hall

2:00pm

A Literary Examination Of The Molding Of Identity And Community Responsibility In Kendrick Lamar’s To Pimp A Butterfly
Kendrick Lamar’s hip-hop album, To Pimp a Butterfly, works as a continuation of black poetic literary traditions and its uses to document the Black American experience. Lamar’s documentation of Black experience comes in the form of hip-hop music, a tool used to communicate black condition, frustration, and cultural power since the 1970s. For my thesis, I will explore how Lamar’s To Pimp a Butterfly conveys emotion and experience to the audience and his fusion of poetry and performance aspects of hip-hop. Lamar explicates his own personal narrative in To Pimp a Butterfly as he deals with battles in identity, depression, and a sometimes hopeless search to resolve the issues that plague not only himself, but the community he speaks for. Furthermore, I will also examine the importance of thematic principles like survivor’s guilt and redemption, diaspora, and racial disparity in To Pimp a Butterfly and how they are based in the regionalism of Lamar’s hometown of Compton, California. As well as, how these themes expand across the album, growing deeper as Lamar’s personal relationship with them becomes more complex and harder to resolve. To Pimp a Butterfly works as not only a hip-hop piece but utilizes the most basic makeup of the genre, poetry, to convey a continual process of self discovery that is added upon throughout every track. This is done through epiphanic moments that mark the growing understanding of Lamar’s own identity and his own lack of agency’s connection to the impoverished, chaotic state that his home community of Compton lives in.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 2:00pm - 2:20pm
232 Karpen Hall

2:00pm

The Gatekeepers Of Environmental Communication: Comparing Environmental Coverage Between The New York Times And The Wall Street Journal
The United States is continuously one of the world’s leaders in greenhouse gas emissions per capita (Spinellis, 2013), however, Americans remain divided when considering climate change. This research paper scrutinizes the coverage of climate change in The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal, two of the United States’ most popular newspapers based upon circulation. The public’s views on climate change are becoming increasingly polarized and Americans appear more politically divided on the topic now than in the past. Using techniques of comparative analysis, this study will provide insights on agenda-building with respect to each newspaper’s climate coverage in June 2017, a peak month for climate coverage.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 2:00pm - 2:20pm
316 Karpen Hall

2:00pm

CO2 Emissions From Asheville’s Craft Brewing Industry
This study examined the relationship between two of Asheville’s foundational identities—its environmentally mindful community and the craft brewing industry. The goal was to quantify CO2 emissions from the fermentation process of brewing beer at local breweries in Asheville. Additionally, this project determined whether or not emissions from fermentation were substantial compared to CO2 emissions from the breweries’ electricity usage. Data from three breweries were analyzed. Our results show that the emissions from fermentation were not substantial in relation to electricity usage. Total CO2 emissions from electricity usage from all three breweries were slightly over 31,000 tonnes compared to just under 70 tonnes of CO2 from fermentation. Emissions from fermentation were less than 0.5% of emissions from individual breweries’ electricity usage. While 70 tonnes of CO2 may not seem substantial, this study was limited to just three of the more than 35 breweries in Asheville as of 2016. As such, it is too soon to dismiss fermentation emissions as being unimportant to Asheville’s carbon footprint.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 2:00pm - 2:20pm
014 Zeis Hall

2:00pm

Race And Poverty
Too many American citizens believe that if they are not currently living in a state of poverty, then it does not or won’t ever affect them. When actually, the question is not if poverty will affect you, but when and how it will. Areas known to have high rates of poverty suffer from inadequate healthcare, higher crime rates, a lack of resources for education, and low socioeconomic mobility, and these are just a few consequences. These are also all factors that contribute to the overall economic growth. Furthermore, impoverished areas seem to have another thing in common, they are highly populated with minorities. While many Americans think that we are progressing as a society when it comes to racial inequalities, the data tells a different story. In this presentation, I intend to explore the relationship between race and poverty. There is an obvious correlation between destitution and genetic makeup. By observing demographics, rates of poverty and social policy data from the United States census at a national and local level, this research aims to understand why there is such a gap, and if it is racially motivated.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 2:00pm - 2:20pm
012 Karpen Hall

2:00pm

According To Them: Community-Based Participatory Needs Assessment Of A Local Public Housing Community
It has been well documented that low-income communities of color experience substantial health inequalities. This is partially a result of and perpetuated by limited access to adequate, affordable, culturally-competent medical care. While similar factors often contribute to limited access across low-income communities of color, knowing the specific needs of individual communities is essential for appropriate interventions. This research seeks to shed light on the individual needs of a local public housing community comprising largely People of Color. To identify specific needs and potential remedies, a community health assessment survey was administered to residents in the neighborhood. To center the perspectives of the most impacted people and to empower community-led intervention, the research was conducted through a community-based participatory framework and represented a collaboration among community members, an independent researcher, and the resource center within the housing community. Preliminary findings suggest a community need for mental health services and a desire for a past herbalism program to return. Final results will be used to inform an intervention implemented as part of the resource center’s 2018 work plan.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 2:00pm - 2:20pm
236 Zageir Hall

2:00pm

Ethnographic Discovery Through Material Objects
How could one learn about culture through material objects? Usually one thinks about social groups and relationship among individuals when one thinks about ethnography, the systematic study of human cultures. In this poster presentation, students in Ethnographic Methods show how objects reflect culture in ethnographic sites as diverse as jazz clubs, coffee shops, tea houses, meditation centers, botanical gardens, and rehabilitation hospitals. Students demonstrate how social relationships are created through material things in smoking cigars, learning sign language, taking night walks, hearing conversion stories, heeding how family is conceptualized among drag performers, and attending to intergenerational identity among Asian-Americans.



Tuesday April 24, 2018 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Sherrill Center Concourse

2:00pm

Software for Stochastic Simulation of Biochemical Systems
Every living thing is composed of complex interlocking systems. These systems determine how tall a tree grows, how bright a firefly is, and how an immune system fights diseases. Systems are composed of a variety of biochemical compounds that interacting in complex ways, creating or breaking into new compounds in response to the environment around them. Quantifying and observing the behavior of these systems requires us to abstract the behavior of these interactions, but even this simplification can be difficult to understand and quantify mathematically. Software libraries exist to assist researchers in this field, but many are so complex in operation that require an in-depth understanding of computer science to utilize or they do not offer specific capabilities that the system of inquiry requires.
We present GillesPy2, a software library intended to solve the needs of many scientists; from the result seeking wet-lab biologist to the performance seeking bioinformatician. GillesPy2 is a next-generation of the original GillesPy library, an open source cross-platform Python library used for creating statistically correct trajectories for biochemical ordinary differential equations. GillesPy2 has been designed with a focus on providing both ease of use and clarity to the end user, using a unique modular solver system that allows the end user to specify the algorithm to solve their system of inquiry. This granularity is coupled with high-level functionality allowing the researcher to communicate and export their findings seamlessly.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Sherrill Center Concourse

2:00pm

Depression And Your Microbiome
Thanks to the internet and social media, living in 2018, humans are now exposed to more harmful, and at times significantly more stressful, news than someone who lived in 1980. Current studies show that one in four freshmen report experiencing mental health struggles, which can lead to a host of concerns including academic struggles. More alarming is that NCAA colligate athletes are reported to suffer from mental health issues at higher rates than their non-athlete peers. Current research has shown that the gut microbiome, the vast array of microorganisms in the gut, has a direct connection to the brain, and thus may have a significant, bidirectional impact on mental health. More research is needed to investigate how the microbiome of students and student-athletes changes over the course of their first semester in college, given the new environment and increased stress that many students face. A pilot study that would consist of 5 student-athletes and 5 traditional students will complete a pre and post semester microbiome analysis, dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry scan, heart rate variability analysis, and demographic and psychosocial questionnaires to help identify potentially related changes in mental health, physical health, and body composition. Participants will also be responsible for keeping a daily food log for the duration of the study. The study will serve as a basis for further research in hopes of furthering our understanding of gut health and its relationship to mental health. The link between depression specifically and the makeup of the microbiome would be the key focus. Studying student-athletes’ and traditional student’s microbiomes in relation to student life and performance will allow for the possibility of improving sport and academic performance and alleviate possible symptoms depression these groups frequently face.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Sherrill Center Concourse

2:00pm

Early Identification Of Chronic Condition And Influencing Environmental/Social Factors
Poor communication between health care providers and patients can lead to significant deleterious consequences, ranging from heart disease, stroke, cancer, type 2 diabetes, and obesity. Conditions such as these are among the most costly, and preventable of all health problems. As such, programs that aim to improve this communication may lead to heightened early diagnosis and the prevention of chronic condition. One possible solution may include modifying the preliminary intake forms patients are asked to submit before the doctor visit. My model will be grounded on the Clinical/Community Population Health Intervention Model. I plan to create a new format for the current form that will inquire about health, improve assessment of priority health issues, and enable the patient to take action. Outcomes of the new form will become a collective database for future prevention, diagnosis, and technique or improved communication.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Sherrill Center Concourse

2:00pm

Exploring The Effects Of Socioemotional Development Of Summer Camp On Foster Care Children
Nearly 440,000 children are currently in the foster care system. Most children in foster care have been exposed to a multitude of adverse experiences, including maltreatment and neglect, which can make these children more susceptible to socioemotional challenges. Previous research suggests that summer camps have a positive impact on youth development, therefore it is important to see whether foster children experience similar positive benefits from such experiences. I will be conducting a comparative analysis of how summer camp impacts foster kids compared to those that come from stable homes. Specifically we will be assessing the effects of participation in YMCA’s Camp Watia on self-esteem, socioemotional status, and self-worth. Both parents and children will complete a battery of assessments before and after each week long camp session. I predict that both groups of kids will display a positive correlation between camp attendance and socioemotional outcomes; however, I think the difference between the pre and post assessments of the foster kids will yield more growth. If the results support my hypothesis, this study could be used to gain increased support and funding for programs that promote camp attendance among children in the foster care system. This would allow more foster kids the opportunity to obtain the rich and positive impacts that camps can have on these children’s lives.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Sherrill Center Concourse

2:00pm

Heart Rate Variability Biofeedback And The Dual Benefits It Could Have On Athletes With Asthma
Asthma and exercise-induced asthma seem to be a prevalent issue for many athletes. Numerous college and professional athletes suffer from asthma and have to find ways to cope with it on a daily basis. Heart Rate Variability Biofeedback has been shown to decrease the symptoms of asthma in studies done in general groups. It has also been shown to increase the peak performance of many athletes by helping them recover more quickly. Since HRV biofeedback could decrease the symptoms of asthma and increase peak performance for athletes, there may be a dual benefit to the use of HRVB with athletes who experience symptoms of asthma. This study will look at two groups; athletes that suffer from asthma and athletes that do not suffer from asthma. Both groups will receive HRV training to attempt to increase their HRV but to also see if it effects those with asthma differently. By comparing the two group’s peak performance, it could be seen that those with asthma may see a better performance outcome due to increased peak performance and reduced symptoms.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Sherrill Center Concourse

2:00pm

Mindfulness & Athletic Performance For Middle Schoolers
Asheville Middle School (AMS) strives to excel in academics, athletics, and involvement in the community, and recently the school has started to incorporate mindfulness into students’ everyday activities. The objective of this public service project was to extend this practice into athletics and shift mindfulness from a required activity to something the students could enjoy and benefit from in an extra-curricular context. The methods undertaken as part of the project included weekly visits to AMS to lead mindfulness practices with the girls’ soccer team. Prior to the beginning of each practice, a new mindfulness technique circling the idea of visualization and breathing was explained. Following the completion of the technique, an explanation was given on how the athletes could individually implement the practices into their athletic performance. Based on this work, we are developing a manual for coaches. The manual includes a list of mindfulness activities, directions on how to implement each activity, a page of extended resources, and guidance for coaches to move forward with their players. The manual will also emphasize athletics as a whole in hopes to extend this positive movement throughout all athletics and reduce any further negative connotations around mindfulness. Following the completion of the gathered feedback and results on certain exercises and research, all AMS coaches will have the ability to access the created manual to use with their teams so they can cultivate a more stable mind in their athletes and better cooperation overall.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Sherrill Center Concourse

2:00pm

Opioid Epidemic Of 2018 In The Asheville Area And Proposed Solutions
America is facing an epidemic that killed over 33,000 people in 2015 across all ages. Substance abuse among teenagers and adults are only increasing due to the widespread addiction to over the counter drugs and prescription painkillers. Healthy People 2020 has made substance abuse a very high priority, particularly among youth. Rates have increased since reports in 2005 for nonmedical use of prescription drugs. The thought that pain relievers are less harmful to ingest and both increasing availability and access to these drugs has created an epidemic. The opioid crisis has a top down, and bottom up effect. Meaning doctors are prescribing medications to patients with chronic disease allowing the patient to be addicted to the medication. The bottom up aspect is in reference to the lack of knowledge or awareness that individuals have with taking medication. This paradox creates an unfair and problematic cycle in the distribution and abuse of prescribed medication. Millions are impacted by this every year, and it is only becoming more prevalent. I believe the approach to a solution should be multidimensional. First we must build an awareness in the community. This could be done by health educators through seminars, posters, and media. The other direction should come from health care providers. They should be required to educate about the possible effects of taking a medication and also possible alternatives to the medication. They should also be required to follow up with the patient after a week of being on the medication to look for alternatives to the prescription drug. This both verifies the appropriate use, as well as gives the patient a healthy more holistic alternative.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Sherrill Center Concourse

2:00pm

Perspectives on Discrimination and Health
Perspectives on Discrimination and Health - Please see the attched description of poster presentations.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Sherrill Center Concourse

2:00pm

Promotion Of Safe Sleeping Spaces On Campus
Most college students share at least one commonality: the lack of sleep. The goal of this product is to increase the number of hours of quality sleep in order to holistically improve the lives of students whether that be mentally, emotionally, academically, or physically. Hence, providing safe, comfortable spaces in the community “hubs” of campus for both the residential and commuter student bodies to rest is a goal within the Healthy Campus Initiative's grasp of being achieved. Many chemical, and biological factors play a role in the definition of ""quality sleep"" and are used throughout this project to both increase awareness and standards of rest. Other universities and companies across the country have provided information regarding certain methodologies in which to accomplish this mission of creating safe sleeping spaces across a university campus.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Sherrill Center Concourse

2:00pm

Shiloh Community Association
Despite the social barriers, inequality, and economic pressures from the ever-growing population; the Shiloh area of Asheville, NC has maintained its sense of community. One important part of this sense of community involves the meticulous record-keeping of the Shiloh Community Association (SCA). The SCA members, along with the African-American residents of Shiloh, show great commitment: promoting healthy lifestyles, supporting small businesses, recognizing youth education, cultivating diversity, pushing for safe environments, and creating recreational programs, etc.-within their community. With the increasing urban-white population, the inequality and economic gain is on the rise; putting the Shiloh community and its residence at constant risk for displacement. The purpose of this public service project was to assist the SCA in transferring nearly 15 years of archival documents from hard copies to electronic files. The methods undertaken included scanning of documents from many binders, labeling of over one thousand files, organizing the files by year and according to type of file, and training SCA members and residents in how to access and navigate the electronic archive. While the product is a shared electronic folder, the results include greater access to community documents, a living history of the community, and a mode for future documentation. This project represents a community’s effort to keep a sense of community while showcasing commitment. As the student working on this project, I have appreciated the look at a collective product that may provide insight into any disparities between an African-American community and the surrounding urban population, which might also affect its sustainability.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Sherrill Center Concourse

2:00pm

Soccer Biofeedback
College athletes are exposed to high injury risk. Research previously conducted suggests sport injuries can be reduced with psychological and Biofeedback skill training. This presentation will use comparative soccer positions to find the effects correlated to biofeedback and heart rate variability to measure overall peak performance compared to injury reports. Biofeedback examines the body to make determinations about physiology, skeletal trauma, nutritional imbalances, as well as emotional states that can affect the body or mind. The focus of a biofeedback analysis on UNCA soccer players is to promote deep breathing skills, muscle relaxation, emotion regulation, and increased reaction time; these skills can be an indicator of decreased injury risk. The expenditure data will be evaluated using Heart Math and BioPak Software. This presentation will propose a research design in a forthcoming study.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Sherrill Center Concourse

2:00pm

Sound and physiology
For centuries, the universal language of music has been understood to have healing effects. In the last two centuries, humans have invented and utilized electronic music synthesis or the production of sound via transmission of electronic signals. Electronic music synthesis has given humans the capability to produce pure sound waves (i.e., sine, triangle, square, and sawtooth waves), introducing new ways for sound to be experienced. Research has shown that sound, principally pure sound, can have notable effects on physiological functioning. The method called binaural beats involves two sine waves, less than 1500hz and less than 40hz apart played, played in opposite each using stereo headphone. Binaural beat technology has been studied in terms of brainwave entrainment. This works by synchronizing brainwaves to the internal beat pulse created by binaural beats. Studies prove this has effect, but the degree to which it is effective for each individual has been debated. This research project will center around the effects of sound on the autonomic nervous system, specifically stimulation of the parasympathetic nervous system. My goal is to produce and test a more effective method of achieving desired results. Combining the binaural beat technology with heart-rate variability biofeedback, I hope to achieve desired results, altering brainwaves and moving the participants into a relaxed, parasympathetic state.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 2:00pm - 3:30pm
406 Sherrill Center

2:00pm

Stand Up, Speak Out! Bystander Intervention Education
Bystander intervention education is a topic of growing importance on college campuses across the United States. This education encourages students to be active bystanders in situations of potential harm or violence against others by equipping students with the knowledge and tools necessary to intervene. Stand Up, Speak Out (SUSO) is UNC Asheville’s bystander intervention program. Unlike most college bystander intervention programs, Stand Up, Speak Out focuses on a wide array of topics including bullying, discriminatory language, sexual violence, peer pressure and more. Traditionally, each workshop is instructed by a student intern, based in the belief that students will be more receptive to student-led presentations. This poster presentation will explore aspects of the SUSO curriculum, based in the experiences of the Student Coordinator Intern for the program.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Sherrill Center Concourse

2:00pm

The Opioid Epidemic In The United States: A Solution In Cannabis, Moving From “Gateway Drug” To “Exit Drug”
A large population within the United States of America has fallen to the grips of a growing health crisis, opioid addiction. According to recent data, during 2015 there were approximately 52,404 overdose deaths in the United States, with 33,091 as a result of opioids. Not only is the tragedy of death rampant, but also even more disconcerting is the economic and social toll impacting families across the nation. The purpose of my research is to examine and better understand the application medical marijuana may have in combating this crisis. Traditionally, due to education and government policies, medical professionals have often prescribed opioids for pain management, with little consideration for alternative approaches. After reading over 12 scholarly articles and peer reviewed journals I have found a promising potential for medical marijuana in relation to the opioid crisis. The least psychoactive cannabinoids present in cannabis is CBD, meaning it does not get users “high”, unlike the more commonly known cannabinoid Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). This fact gives CBD the highest potential for medical application and use in treating substance abuse. Many experimental studies that have indicated support for the application of CBD in treating behaviors associated with addiction. Clinical research applied to cannabis in regards for managing chronic pain has extensively indicated that cannabis is safe and effective as a treatment option. One drug can rarely treat all aspects of a condition, including chronic pain; this opens the door for the potential of using cannabis in conjunction with opioids to treat pain. Research has indicated that the introduction to cannabis for treating chronic pain has the potential to result in reduction or even complete termination of opioid use. I believe that the medical and social potential of cannabis should be further discussed in regards to the opioid crisis.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Sherrill Center Concourse

2:00pm

The Relationship Between Media Use In Children And The Rise Of ADHD Diagnoses
From 2000 to 2011, diagnoses of ADHD rose 42 percent. One in 10 children in the US are currently diagnosed with ADHD, and this number is increasing. I would like to explore the link between ADHD diagnosis and early use of electronics in childhood. Contributing factors to this problem could be a trend towards allowing children access to TV, computers, video games, and cell phones more frequently and at younger ages. The primary treatments for ADHD are medication and therapy. Medication for chronic behavioral disorders in early childhood is problematic, and I would like to explore an intervention that prevents attention deficit disorders from the beginning by reducing screen time for young children at home and in schools. None of the current treatments are preventative or holistic. Through encouraging outdoor and creative play in place of screen time we may be able to effectively “slow down” kids’ brains in a constructive way so as to encourage calmer and more focused behavior. I am proposing an intervention for elementary school aged children that would stem from an in-school program and be carried out at home to reduce the amount of time they spend in front of a screen and encourage them to come up with new forms of creative entertainment. The intervention would engage students in a competition to prove which student could spend the least amount of time in front of a screen over the course of the school year. A large incentive prize would be presented to the student who most successfully reduced media time by the end of the year. I believe a program like this could empower children and change lifelong habits of media use.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Sherrill Center Concourse

2:00pm

Native American Women In Activism
Native American Women in Activism will explore contemporary indigenous activism, with a focus on women’s roles within their community and how they utilize these roles in times of resistance. The intent being to show the female methodology of activism and how this methodology is shaping political movements throughout the indigenous world. There will be an emphasis on the cultural significance of traditional gender roles and the respected place that women hold in traditional indigenous communities, juxtaposed with the current high rates of violence against indigenous women. Showing that through their activism they are not only standing up for indigenous rights but reclaiming their traditional empowered female roles in their communities. Highlighting young female water protectors within the Standing Rock protest and showing how they used tradition, coupled with modern technology, to engage in nonviolent direct action. Using the film End of the Line: Women of Standing Rock, Directed by Shannon Kring, as the basis of this “new” method of resistance. This will be an extension of the research that was done for the Solei International conference, on the panel Indigenous Resistance Through Film.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Sherrill Center Concourse

2:00pm

Intrinsic Motivation: Its Impact On Employee Engagement And Employee Motivation
Over the past decade, there has been greater interest in engaging and retaining employees. Despite this research, many businesses are baffled about how to best motivate their employees. Job growth and competition for talent demands employers to engage, motivate and retain their work force. Firms that can motivate their employees without additional compensation may save on labor costs. Studies about motivating employees date back to classic psychologists such as Herzberg. Therefore, this project’s research question explores academic research on intrinsic and extrinsic motivation through a meta-analysis of recent literature. The literature suggests that employees who are intrinsically motivated with autonomy and purpose may be more engaged in their work. The literature also shows that employees who feel connected to other employees and are encouraged also may have more loyalty to an organization. The literature review includes scholarship on job attractiveness, motivating employees, reducing employee turnover, and engaging employees. The review includes employees in a variety of different occupations and shows that employees may be motivated differently depending upon their industry, skill level, and the company culture. Additionally, this paper proposes that employees with greater motivation are potentially of greater value for an organization.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Sherrill Center Concourse

2:00pm

Sporting Clays Noise Level Methodology Verification of Four Stations

An emerging outdoor activity is sporting clays shooting. Many current ranges meet safety and noise level acceptable standards. However, the data does not meet professional standards.  In January 2018 a request was made to test a sporting clays site. The purpose of this paper is to document noise levels, to use professional equipment, and to verify methodology.  Shooting stations were examined on two days (sample size: 170 shots).  Pairwise comparisons were made and verified. Mean noise level was μ = 60.9 dBA (σ = 6.40 dBA).  The loudest group of 4 stations closest to the closest home was significantly greater than the other 11 stations (μ = 63.7 dBA (σ = 6.66 dBA)).  This group is well below OSHA and International Standards Organization (ISO). Recommendations were made to reduce noise levels in the interest of community relations.



Tuesday April 24, 2018 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Sherrill Center Concourse

2:00pm

Sociology and Anthropology Community Engaged Scholars-Service Learning
Each member of the class was assigned an internship at a non-profit in or around Asheville. The students will present posters documenting their experiences, highlighting the mission and work of the organization where they are working, and connecting that work to their student of sociology and anthropology. Their site supervisors will also be on hand to answer questions about their organization and escribe the internship from their point of view.



Tuesday April 24, 2018 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Sherrill Center Concourse

2:20pm

Structural Dynamics In The FO Motor Of ATP Synthase Revealed By Site-Directed Spin-Labeling And CW-EPR
F1FO ATP synthase is present in all life and is responsible for the production of almost all adenosine triphosphate (ATP), the ubiquitous energy currency synthesized during cellular metabolism. The FO motor converts electrochemical potential into mechanical rotation, which drives conformational changes in the F1 facilitating the synthesis of ATP. The mechanism of rotation of the FO rotor (subunit c) ring is unclear, but there is some evidence that the stator (subunit a) is conformationally dynamic. This study looked for further evidence of a ratcheting mechanism of rotation, which would require the α- helices of subunit a that lie on the a-c interface to move during rotation. Site directed mutagenesis was used to introduce cysteine into several positions on subunit a. The mutant ATP synthase was purified, chemically modified with MTSSL, a Cys-reactive spin-label, and observed using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The EPR spectrum is sensitive to the label environment and reports on the mobility of the residue to which the spin label is attached. While pH-dependent differences in mobility were apparent at aL195 and aV86/I161, the multi-component spectra indicated the presence of unreacted and/or off-target spin label preventing conclusive analysis of the data. Optimizing purification methods to remove the contaminating components may improve the quality of the data.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 2:20pm - 2:40pm
123 Zeis Hall

2:20pm

Synthesis Of Pyrazoline Derivatives From Chalcones
Synthesis of pyrazoline derivatives has been an active field of research due to the established biological and pharmaceutical activities of these compounds such as antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer properties. Pyrazoline derivatives can be produced from the cyclization of chalcones with hydrazine hydrate and an aryl aldehyde. The goal of this project is aza-Michael addition of aliphatic amines to various α,β unsaturated carbonyl compounds as a novel approach for pyrazoline synthesis using ionic solvents. Previous research has proven that the use of DBU (1,8-diazabicyclo[5.4.0]-undec7-ene-8) as a catalyst/promoter for aza-Michael addition can provide high yields and has the additional advantage of good reusability. However, the “one pot” total synthesis of pyrazoline derivatives has proven to produce low yields. In this project, the reaction between chalcone (1a-d), hydrazine hydrate, and benzaldehyde with [DBU][Ac] (1,8-diazabicyclo[5.4.0]-undec7-en-8-ium acetate) acting as a catalyst was found to successfully synthesize various pyrazoline derivatives (2a-d). Compound 2b had the highest yield of the four compounds (58.6%) and further research will need to be completed to maximize the yields of the products. The successful synthesis of the derivatives provides a new methodology for the creation of pyrazoline, and supplies incentive for further investigation of the use of ionic liquids as catalysts in the addition of nitrogenous groups to α,β unsaturated carbonyl compounds.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 2:20pm - 2:40pm
202 Zeis Hall

2:20pm

AI Chess with Machine Learning
This project uses techniques from artificial intelligence (AI) to create a program that can play a full game of chess versus a human player. It implements machine learning (ML) to better understand the game of chess and its skill level increases as it gains more experience from its game playing. The personal motivation for this project comes from the enjoyment found while playing chess and the curiosity that blooms when seeing how machines can learn to play such a complex game with success against humans. Furthermore, creating this program offers a better understanding to the mathematical functions and algorithms that allow such a program to make informed game decisions quickly. This work extends previous Javascript chess framework. A web server that runs Ubuntu, Apache, and MySQL hosts the finished project online. Each game’s data in a Portable Game Notation (PGN) file is stored on the server as well. This will allow people to easily access and play against the AI from anywhere with internet access.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 2:20pm - 2:40pm
125 Rhoades Robinson Hall

2:20pm

“Turdy-Facy-Nasty-Paty-Lousy-Fartical Rogues:” Mountebanks And Alchemists In Ben Jonson’s Volpone And The Alchemist
Is it possible for art and writing to be morally curative while simultaneously generating profit for the artist? This is an ever relevant question to ponder, and one this presentation will examine through the lens of two of the plays of Ben Jonson, an early seventeenth century playwright and younger contemporary of Shakespeare. Throughout Jonson’s life, he had a fraught and ever-changing relationship with and understanding of his own role in the literary market in which he was constantly torn between popular theatre and the patronage based system of writing epigrams and masques for the court. During his literary career, he discovered and frequently returned to the intersection of medicine and literature. Satire has often been thought of as a curative enterprise, and Jonson believes that his duty as healer of the mind and soul is directly analogous to a doctor’s duty as healer of the body. One of the manifestations of this connection is the appearance of fraudulent doctors, a mountebank and an alchemist, in two plays of the quartet that are often considered his best comedies, Volpone and The Alchemist. This presentation will argue that Jonson’s use of these figures allows him to work through the complications and challenges of his own relationship with satire, his audience, and the literary marketplace, as well as that of the playwright more generally.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 2:20pm - 2:40pm
232 Karpen Hall

2:20pm

Green Wash And Dry: Comparing Mission Statements Of Oil And Gas Companies To Their Outcomes
This research seeks to identify instances of green-washing within the mission statements of leading fossil fuel companies and how green-washing is operationalized through news releases, campaigns, and social media platforms. The three leading U.S. oil and gas companies, Exxon Mobil, Chevron, and ConocoPhillips, are examined within these parameters. This study aims to expand the literature on green-washing, and the connections between company mission statements, and the outcomes of strategic communication efforts made towards consumers.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 2:20pm - 2:40pm
316 Karpen Hall

2:20pm

Continued Exploration Of Conditions Favoring The Evolution Of Superfetation Using A State Dependent Life History Model
Superfetation is characterized by the ability of an organism to simultaneous carry multiple offspring to term. Further, each offspring may be in a different stage of development. Superfetation has been observed, with varying degrees of confidence, in a wide range of species, most significant being members of the live-bearing fish family Poeciliidae; however, the evolutionary origins of the phenomenon are still unclear. This research builds off previous investigations into the evolutionary origins of superfetation, using a state-dependent life history model. Although the previous model realistically described reproductive decisions for a female poeciliid, the model did not predict superfetation. The goal of this project was to modify the previous model to determine under what circumstances superfetation is predicted. Creative changes to a variety of axioms present in the previous model are being implemented within the programming environment R. Examples of such changes include, but are not limited to, alterations to both the minimum resource requirements for offspring viability, and the assumptions concerning the distribution of resources amongst developing embryos.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 2:20pm - 2:40pm
014 Zeis Hall

2:20pm

Testing The Strength Of Polyphonic Ciphers
In this presentation, I intend to demonstrate that, even with modern software, polyphonic ciphers can be incredibly difficult to decrypt, and are often functionally unbreakable. Specifically, I will construct 35, 55 and 65 character polyphonic ciphers, and will tabulate the results of my attempts to decrypt known messages. Polyphonic ciphers have fallen out of popularity after the development of RSA ‘public key’ ciphers and ‘brute force’ decryption methods; the assumption has been that polyphonic ciphers are susceptible to decryption from a variety of ‘brute force’ decryption methods if sufficient time is allocated using powerful computers. But recent efforts using ‘hill-climbing’ software seem to indicate that this may not be the case. As recent research has suggested, polyphonic ciphers of > 50 alphabets may be functionally unsolvable, and the actual limits of solvability may be lower. The software used for testing this hypothesis will be the ZKDecrypto software created by Brax Sisco. The software was developed specifically for solving encrypted messages created with polyphonic and monophonic ciphers. All ciphers created for this research were constructed manually by hand, without the use of any software, and are rather simple to construct in a short amount of time.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 2:20pm - 2:40pm
012 Karpen Hall

2:20pm

Diversity In Children's Literature: An Examination Of Books In Asheville Elementary Schools
Lack of representation of minority or marginalized groups in children’s literature is not a new phenomenon. The term “diverse literature” has been implemented to embrace a broad scope of identities in literature, such as race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, religion, immigration status, disability, and cultural and linguistic differences. Research has demonstrated that there are myriad reasons why this type of representation matters in children’s literature, such as validation and valuation of identity, creation of positive associations with books and reading, self-empowerment, and imagination development. In the present study, a content analysis of elementary schools’ library catalogues is performed to examine the books available to children in the elementary schools (including public and private) in Asheville, North Carolina. Asheville is one of the few liberal cities in a predominantly conservative state, and has an active LGBTQ+ community, but is almost 80% white. The data empirically evaluates the type and amount of diverse literature available to elementary school students in Asheville, and how this differs based on the school. The present study then sociologically illuminates the theoretical implications of how diverse literature is (or is not) presented to children in a predominately white, liberal city in the Southeastern United States.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 2:20pm - 2:40pm
236 Zageir Hall

2:40pm

Artificial Intelligence in a Robot Playing Arm
While artificial intelligence is primarily a branch of computer science, its application in robotics remains heavily focused only in the engineering discipline. With intelligent systems being so prevalent in our current society and the future at large, we as computer scientists are potential robotics developers capable of contributing to this new paradigm. This project seeks to blend the two studies and explore some challenges faced in programming for robotics. We will do so by attempting to solve how a robotic arm would play an optimal game of Jenga. In this case, we define the optimal state to be a tower with only one block at each level, and if another piece is to be drawn, the tower would fall. The decision model for the game-play environment uses the basics of Markov Decision Process (MDP) with the addition of reinforcement learning to estimate the missing transition probability function. We implemented the temporal difference (TD) algorithm of reinforcement learning in order for the arm to teach itself the optimal path through a series of simulated test runs aiming for reward maximization. Analysis of results will demonstrate successful learning through the progression of total rewards achieved after each run. Once the learning is optimized in the simulation, integration with the physical robot arm would follow. The scripts are written in Python (3.0) and the simulation uses the open source Robot Operating System (ROS) framework and Gazebo simulator. This platform AI program will be used as a baseline for Dr. Kenneth Bogert’s undergraduate research and as part of a demo running behind glass for the UNC-Asheville Computer Science department. The presentation will discuss the MDP model and effects of TD-learning through a simulated demo.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 2:40pm - 3:00pm
125 Rhoades Robinson Hall

2:45pm

Ishmael As Guide To The Reader In The Hunt For The Great White Whale
Moby Dick, published in 1851, is an allegorical novel about a whale hunt in which Herman Melville makes unique use of a first person narrator, a young sailor named Ishmael. Though Ishmael is the only narrator of the story, his presence fluctuates so that at times he ceases to bring awareness to himself as part of the narrative for entire chapters. He does this by omitting personal language or pronouns, and sometimes describes scenes he is not a part of at all. Ishmael introduces the reader to the facts of the narrative, and provides background information as well as philosophical guidance for the reader. In these scenes when he disappears as a character in the physical text, he does not cease to exist because he has created a bond with the reader as the sole narrator of the story. When Melville removes Ishmael from parts of the novel, Ishmael steps outside of the narrative, but by continuing to narrate, he implies that he, too, is observing the story as a reader or an audience member. In this way, Ishmael aligns himself with the reader, creating a closer bond between himself and his reader. This serves to draw the reader into the novel more intimately, and the way in which it is executed also serves to guide the reader in understanding the allegorical aspects of the novel. Melville’s creative use of narrator helps his reader to navigate the philosophy of man and nature discussed in the novel through the story of the hunt for a legendary whale.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 2:45pm - 3:05pm
232 Karpen Hall

2:45pm

Best Tactics for Non-Profit Environmental Campaigns
This study examines the tactics of non-profit environmental campaigns in an effort to determine best practices for direct-action campaigns. Information was gathered through in depth interviews of employees of several environmental non-profits in Asheville, North Carolina. When possible, the interviewee held an official communications position. However, because not all non-profits have a communications position, the employee with the most campaign planning experience was interviewed. The interviews were analyzed and compared to determine successful and unsuccessful campaign tactics. A review of current literature about behavioral psychology is used in an attempt to explain why tactics succeed. The theory of human psychology impeding a large-scale acceptance of environmental campaigns’ messages is discussed with examples of successful and unsuccessful environmental campaign tactics, although the two are rarely found in the same research. This study connects existing literature between non-profit environmental campaigns and behavioral psychology.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 2:45pm - 3:05pm
316 Karpen Hall

2:45pm

Terrafemme: An Investigation In Composting Menstrual Products
Each year, the United States adds 17 billion used tampons and pads into our landfills, many of which are made from synthetic fibers, plastics, and foams that take hundreds of years to decompose. Biodegradable menstrual waste products made from natural cotton do exist in the current market, but are wastefully thrown into the trash. The goal of this research is to investigate the possibility of a compostable menstrual waste service at UNCA and in Western North Carolina. This project began through the concept of TerraFemme, a for-profit company that aims to reduce the amount of disposable menstrual napkins in landfills by providing organizations and residences a collection service that composts this material. During the fall semester, TerraFemme’s research has answered the question if composting menstrual waste was physically possible. Aerated static pile composting (ASP composting) is a system which processes conventional compost, such as food scraps and yard waste, but also commonly processes pathogenic materials like animal carcasses, animal waste, and diapers. This process allows proper moisture and aeration control for the compost pile to heat to temperatures between 130 -150 F which kills pathogens and other toxic compounds. If this process kills animal and human pathogenic waste to create potent compost, then menstrual napkins could theoretically be composted as well. Now the question is if there are pathogenic concerns regarding menstrual waste. If there are concerns, then the process in which we currently dispose of menstrual waste is endangering janitorial staff who are in constant contact and ASP composting would be an ideal disposal alternative. There is currently little research on pathogenic content in menstrual blood, which stops industries from composting this material. This research will focus on the pathogenic contents of menstrual blood as well as the logistical, legislative, and social obstacles associated with composting menstrual waste.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 2:45pm - 3:05pm
014 Zeis Hall

2:45pm

The Black Athlete And Social Issues: Just Shut Up And Dribble
This presentation will review the social issues of the Black athlete the past fifty years, the civil rights issues of African-Americans and the role of the African-American athlete have been closely associated with one another. From prominent athletes such as Jim Brown have used the platform of sports to bring awareness to the conditions of African-Americans, while current athletes like Colin Kaepernick face an uncertain professional future for leading the protest of not standing during the national anthem in 2016. The purpose of the research being conducted is to identify the issues of the Black athlete, and the breakdown in how these issues are interpreted by consumers who attend and watch sporting events daily in the United States. While the focus of this research will be in reviewing past social issues and the reactions of Black athletes, there is also the issues of the 2017 football season, and President Donald Trump personally condemning the NFL for allowing players to protest. By comparing various social issues involving the Black athlete we will also examine how said issues correlate with the opinions and reactions of consumers.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 2:45pm - 3:05pm
012 Karpen Hall

2:45pm

Influence of Religiosity on Parental Discussion of Sexual Violence
According to the Bureau of Justice Statistics, individuals ages 12 to 34 are at the highest risk of experiencing sexual violence. Due to this prevalence, there is a continuing need for more effective prevention efforts directed towards adolescents. Current prevention methods exist primarily in school settings, leaving a gap in understanding what adolescents obtain from their socialization at home through discussion with their parents. Existing research infers that there is an intersection between religiosity and attitudes towards sex, but fails to discuss how these religious beliefs govern parents' communication with their children on sexual violence specifically. To explore this influence of religiosity on parental discussion, I conduct qualitative interviews to compare discussions held by parents of strong Christian faith to those held by parents of no apparent faith. Preliminary findings suggest that there is a lack of direct discussion of sexual violence in both households, which supports the theme of silence found in rape culture. By identifying differences in religious and secular parental discussion, rape prevention and sex education programs may gain clearer direction in how to address their audiences accordingly.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 2:45pm - 3:05pm
236 Zageir Hall

3:05pm

Environmental Communication In Elementary Schools
This study is a case study focusing on environmental communications within the curriculum for elementary students. Kindergarten and first grade students participate in hands on education about healthy food habits as well as developing awareness of composting and recycling. The study seeks to understand how elementary students communicate what they have learned in school about local and fresh foods, composting and recycling with their families. This case study is made possible through service learning with the Feast program at Vance Elementary School, which promotes the importance of growing local food, eating fresh, recycling and composting. Interviews with the participating students and their parents were conducted. This study broadens the literature on environment education and communication in elementary school.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 3:05pm - 3:25pm
316 Karpen Hall

3:05pm

The Burnsville Fault: Determining The Southwest Extension And Relation To The Hayesville Fault
The Appalachian orogen records a complex history, including three mountain building events associated with the assembly of Pangea: the Ordovician Taconic, Silurian-Devonian Acadian, and the late Paleozoic Alleghenian orogenies. The dextral strike slip Burnsville fault runs through western North Carolina (WNC) and is the only Acadian structure in WNC. It was previously mapped between Asheville and Spruce Pine, NC. The Burnsville fault separates the Eastern Blue Ridge (EBR) and the Western Blue Ridge (WBR), which includes ~1 billion year old Grenville basement rocks. This boundary formed during the Taconic orogeny and was reactivated during the Acadian orogeny as the Burnsville fault. The southwest extension of the Burnsville fault is unclear. The Hayesville fault to the southwest of Asheville has previously been documented as a Taconic structure that, like the Burnsville fault, separates the EBR from the WBR. There is a level of uncertainty regarding the relationship between the Burnsville and Hayesville faults due to similar metamorphic conditions during the Taconic and Acadian as well as Alleghanian overprinting. This study tested the hypothesis that the Burnsville fault overprinted the Hayesville fault by mapping the Hayesville fault in the southwest corner of the Clyde 7.5 minute quadrangle, NC. Shear sense indicators, vertical to slightly southeast dipping mylonite trending ~N45°E, and a shallow to horizontal plunging stretching lineation indicate ductile dextral strike slip faulting. Temperatures obtained from dynamic quartz recrystallization that occurred during deformation showed temperatures of ~500° C with slight overprinting from temperatures of less than 400° C. Findings for this shear zone are consistent to what has previously been documented in the Burnsville shear zone to the northeast. Detailed field mapping and microstructure analysis demonstrates that, at least locally, the Burnsville fault possibly continues along the northwest extension of the Hayesville fault.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 3:05pm - 3:25pm
014 Zeis Hall

3:05pm

Select Speciesm & Human Compassion
The western world often holds certain species of animals above others when it comes to differentiating between the categories of food and pet. This research looks at the psychological, social and cultural reasoning behind meat consumption. This topic also delves into veganism and the ethical reasoning for people to rebel against social/cultural norms of meat consumption within society. This presentation will explore the relationship between speciesm within meat eaters and vegans, as well as the cultural expectations and repercussions.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 3:05pm - 3:25pm
012 Karpen Hall

3:05pm

“Man, I Feel Like A Woman”: A Feminist Literary Critic Of Mrs. Doubtfire
It is perhaps surprising that a story about a man who violates court orders, manipulates his family, and perpetuates stereotypical gender roles would ever have been considered fit for the big screen. In our society, however, if we add a ridiculously-costumed comedy actor to an already impressive cast, a film can make over $400 million at the box office, as Mrs. Doubtfire did. Using the lens of feminist literary criticism, I will take a deeper look into this film, which was and is still characterized as a remarkable tale of the lengths that a devoted father will go to be with his children. In this paper, I will argue that Daniel Hillard (played by Robin Williams) perpetuates both male and female gender stereotypes through his mannerisms, speech, and body language. I will also take a deeper look into the specifics of the female body which Hillard chose to inhabit. I write this critical examination of the portrayal of this man as father, “mother,” and husband in an effort to answer the question of why Hillard chose this particular body to accomplish his purposes, and how his perspective changed as he shifted from the father figure to the “mother”. I will also briefly discuss the problematic themes of the book Alias Madame Doubtfire by Anne Fine, which was the inspiration for the film. A presentation by Natalie Branson (under the advisement of Dr. Melissa Burchard) in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Bachelor of Arts in Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 3:05pm - 3:25pm
236 Zageir Hall

3:20pm

Interdisciplinary Game Design In The Unity 3D Engine
This software development project implements a board game, King of Tokyo, using Object Oriented (OO) abstractions and MVC (Model View Controller) architecture. Undergraduate computer science curricula often lack group software development, so this project teaches team skills as well as software design skills and good coding practices. This project combines OO development methodologies with Unity’s standard component-based game design. The software’s MVC architecture provides a separation between the game state (model) and the graphical representation of the game (view), which allows the team to work on both modules simultaneously and easily make design changes. Unity game objects implement this view by displaying graphics and notifying the controller of user inputs. The OO features of C#, such as interfaces, facilitate this logical separation between the model and the view. This semester we have focused on implementing a variety of art into our game. This includes 2D card art, UI elements, 3D models, and game music and sound effects. Part of our focus this semester is finding the best way to create and import the artwork as to streamline the process of implementing and updating it as we proceed.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 3:20pm - 3:40pm
125 Rhoades Robinson Hall

3:25pm

Longitudinal Zonation and Functional Feeding Groups of Western North Carolina Fishes
The variation in fish assemblage structure from high to low elevations was observed in two rivers within the French Broad River Basin, Swannanoa River and Little River. The Little River is less disturbed than the Swannanoa River, as the Swannanoa has greater development around it. I hypothesized that the headwater streams of the two rivers would possess smaller, less diverse assemblages of species and functional feeding groups than at lower elevations. I took samples of fish using a Backpack Electrofisher, taking them from riffles and pools at five sites along each stream, starting at the headwaters and ending near the tail waters for a ten-day period in June 2017. The number of species and functional feeding groups increased as the river sites decreased in elevation, as did the number of individuals per feeding group. This displayed a case of longitudinal replacement, which could serve as a model for predicting where certain fish species can be found in greater abundance in future studies. Both rivers surprisingly had the same number of species. The most abundant species found in both the Swannanoa and the Little Rivers was the Mottled Sculpin (17.4% and 15.6% respectively). The Swannanoa River ended up having all seven of the functional groups within its lowest elevation, whereas the Little River’s only had six. This difference indicates that the Swannanoa has a slightly greater capacity for supporting more niches than the Little River, due to its larger size, which may provide a buffer against development. 

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 3:25pm - 3:45pm
014 Zeis Hall

3:25pm

Does Your Computer Know Who You Are, And Try To Persuade You?
This presentation will look to see if your increased willingness to share on social media allows the use of cookies and computer algorithms to know who you are. Are these personality profiles accurate enough to create persuasive advertisements tailored to you? Using Facebook's original selling point of being able to build apps through its open platform and build off Facebook itself, and now with recent advancements other apps and websites are able to log in through Facebook it has put together a huge audience and data pool for app developers. As people have gotten used to the collection of their information through cookies, their information they share on Facebook was thought to be private. Recent events have shown that some app developers sold your personal data they collected through Facebook apps and quizzes, was used to influence ads you personally would see in the 2016 presidential election.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 3:25pm - 3:45pm
012 Karpen Hall

3:25pm

Resisting The Male Gaze In 21st Century American Poetry
In Western Literature, the male gaze has become a staple in speaker perspective through poetry in which women have been objectified by the poet for the benefit of art. Since men have been the primary gatekeepers for who gets published and whose story gets told, only one side of the gaze is provided. However, this is changing within the context of women poets from America in the 21st century. By being given the agency to share their stories and their perspectives, they are proving that women do not need to be objectified for art, in fact the art is now becoming one with the speaker. There has been much debate and scholarship on the effect of the male gaze since Laura Mulvey coined the term the male gaze; and some critics believe that the concept of the male gaze is so concrete that it’s impossible to actively and accurately resist the male gaze. Taking that into consideration, Zoe will take multiple female poets and use their poetry in case examples of how resistance is occurring in each. Using foundational theory and historical context of the development of the male gaze in the written world she will prove how the handful of poems successfully subvert the male gaze. Zoe will then consider the patterns of resistance and subversion by the female poets and look towards the future, contemplating an era in Western Literature where the male gaze will become completely obsolete.

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