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Health/Wellness Promotion [clear filter]
Tuesday, April 24
 

8:40am PDT

Effectiveness Of Equine Facilitated Psychotherapy For The Treatment Of Psychiatric Disorders
Psychiatric disorders, primarily those such as Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Social Phobia, Depression and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, affect a large amount of the population. It is approximated that 1 in 5 individuals suffer from conditions that can be classified as mental disorders. Current treatment for a range of these psychiatric disorders is centered around approaches such as Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, as well as are often supplemented by the use of pharmaceuticals. This method has not been proven to be particularly effective in treating such disorders, particularly ones such as PTSD, anxiety and depression.The possession of such disorders tends to have co-morbid effects, such as lowered self-esteem, social skill deficits, and underachievement, both academically and professionally. Due to the multitude of negative outcomes for those with these conditions, research has been facilitated in order to propose new approaches to provide solutions with higher efficacy in the treatment of patients suffering from such conditions. Equine Facilitated Psychotherapy is one such method that is beginning to receive support from both the traditional medical, and holistic medicine, communities. EFP is centered around utilizing traditional Cognitive Behavioral Therapy approaches in conjunction with specifically developed activities to incorporate equine animals into the treatment plan. This approach is beginning to acquire an evidence base to support the practice, and a higher number of patients are beginning to choose this method, due to its' numerous benefits and potentially long-lasting effects.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 8:40am - 9:00am PDT
406 Sherrill Center

9:00am PDT

A Review Of Double Up Food Bucks As A Strategy To Improve Health
Diet-related chronic diseases are among the leading causes of death in America. Many of these conditions are preventable and reversible through changes in diet, particularly by increasing the consumption of fresh fruits and vegetables. As these diet-related chronic diseases affect lower socio-economic classes disproportionately, many organizations employ strategies to influence fresh produce consumption among these populations. One such strategy is the Double Up Food Bucks (DUFB) program developed by the “Fair Food Network,” which incentivizes the purchase of fresh produce by Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) recipients. The aim of this study is to examine the literature on the effectiveness of DUFB programs on increasing healthy food consumption and improving health. This study is a narrative literature review. The methods include a search of relevant articles and an examination of incentivized nutritional programs as compared to nutritional education efforts and to restrictions on purchases. The review also seeks to summarize the progress and results of the many nationwide DUFB programs. Search terms included SNAP, DUFB, healthy food incentives, food access, and effects of incentives on health/nutrition. This review includes three randomized controlled trials, six reviews and longitudinal analyses, two longitudinal quasi-experimental studies, one mixed- method study, one case study, one cross-sectional survey, and one graduate thesis, as well as data reported by the “Fair Food Network” in their annual reports. This paper also highlights obstacles and barriers to reaching target populations. The review summarizes opportunities for future research on the impact of incentive programs on health behaviors and exposes gaps in program outcomes. Analyses suggest that incentivized nutritional programs are effective in increasing the purchase and consumption of fresh produce among SNAP recipients, but also that this strategy may have limited impact on improving the overall health of this population.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 9:00am - 9:20am PDT
406 Sherrill Center

9:20am PDT

Tobacco And Alcohol Marketing To Youth In Yancey, Avery, And Mitchell Counties, NC
Underage drinking and tobacco use are prevalent in the United States. This is an issue because of the marketing techniques used to entice underage youth to want to try alcohol and tobacco before they are of legal purchasing age. Some policies to restrict large corporations from marketing exist, but stores have latitude. The goal of this study was to assess stores in the Yancey, Mitchell and Avery County. This study includes 27 items generated by CounterTools to focus on the marketing techniques in stores. Some of these items include alcohol or tobacco products within 12 in of children items, are any of these items 3 feet of the floor, which product has the most stock, as well as what is the least price of these items. These items were given to a group of 4 students. The 4 students were given 60 stores to collect data from. The students will then take the collected data and enter the data into graphs to determine frequencies for each of the item in question. Students will present the findings to the Board of Health to show why it is pertinent to raise the legal purchase age of tobacco to 21 and to make sure all stores are following the marketing guidelines of these products so the youth are not wanting to start these habits.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 9:20am - 9:40am PDT
406 Sherrill Center

9:40am PDT

Drying Out: An examination of Prohibition on Native American lands.
Despite various efforts, the Native American community is severely affected by substance abuse. Research suggests that one in ten Native American deaths are alcohol related, indicating the need for interventions. Interventions have usually included laws or policies put in place by the Federal Government limiting alcohol sales on Native American reservations. Since most of these laws have been changed with time, tribes now have the power to enforce their own laws on alcohol sales. Although this has made many Native communities give up on their efforts of prohibition, some Native Tribes are still hesitant to allow alcohol to be sold within the community. Employing a literature review on substance abuse control within Native communities, this study examines the health implications of prohibition on Native American populations, particularly in Cherokee, NC. The findings of the research suggest mixed results.Overall, communities that did not allow the sell of alcohol appeared to have fewer alcohol-related incidents. The negative implications included an increase in crime related to alcohol and the income lost to the neighboring communities that take advantage of the prohibition. Although some positive benefits have come out of prohibition in Native lands, it is clear that it would be more beneficial of Native American communities to avoid prohibition and progress in other methods of substance abuse care. Approaches, including policies that align with the culture and that are more natural, such as medical marijuana, should be considered.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 9:40am - 10:00am PDT
406 Sherrill Center

10:15am PDT

Best Practices for Reducing Physician Burnout
Despite quantitative and qualitative research revealing the high prevalence and serious consequences of physician burnout in the United States, little is known about the approaches for reducing or eliminating burnout. While burnout reduction programs are vital for providing support, services, and informations to physicians who are experiencing burnout, the effects of the programs are temporary and limited by participation. This study aims to explore the causes of burnout, program successes, and institutional changes through a narrative review of the literature. The methods of this study include a collection of literature from relevant public health database searches using keywords followed by an analysis of the recent and historical changes in medicine, and examination of the successes, failures, and limitations of burnout reduction programs and applied institutional change. Results of this study suggest burnout reduction programs are successful in short-term burnout reduction within physicians who attend, through training of mindfulness, coping strategies. These findings indicates establishing that institutional and policy change is necessary to ensure lasting burnout reduction and prevention. These findings may have implications for for-profit medical systems, insurance companies, and policy initiatives.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 10:15am - 10:35am PDT
406 Sherrill Center

10:35am PDT

Healthy Foods in Cherokee Childcare Facilities
Childhood obesity and other diet-related health issues are of concern for American Indians. American Indian children and adolescents are about thirty percent more likely to develop and suffer from obesity when compared to White children and adolescents. The American Indian population, on average, is twice as likely to be diagnosed with Diabetes than any other population in the United States. A promising intervention is in early childhood education centers, including the Dora Reed Center in Cherokee, North Carolina. The purpose of this project was to create a professional development program for the kitchen staff to help increase their knowledge surrounding cultural appropriate and nutritious dishes for the 266 children at the Dora Reed Center. Our methods included: a literature review to understand contributing factors for nutrition-related behaviors; a visit and conversations with center staff; visit to and learning about Rainbow in My Tummy in Black Mountain, and searching for culturally-relevant information. Through this process, our team learned about US Department of Agriculture Food Guidelines for Child Care Facilities, curriculum for preparing foods in child care settings, school-based programs, and cultural issues, such as Colonization’s effect on foods, food access issues, and different Tribal foods. Recommendations include requiring teachers to model healthy eating behaviors, offering alternatives and different food options, purchasing Rainbow in My Tummy and shadowing of the on-site chef, and distribution of calendars and recipes featuring seasonal foods and culturally appropriate dishes. If implemented, these efforts could result in a decrease in childhood obesity and prevention of future diagnoses of Diabetes across the American Indian populations.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 10:35am - 10:55am PDT
406 Sherrill Center

11:15am PDT

Techniques To Prevent Overuse Injuries Among Collegiate Athletes
The long-term consequences of overuse injuries can impact both academic and athletic performance of collegiate athletes. Over the course of my research I have identified and summarized the determinants leading to high rates of overuse injury. To prevent chronic health consequences resulting from untreated injuries, I will propose a series of strategies to implement with NCAA Collegiate Athletes. Using evidence based data I will discuss the use of acquiring proper technology to track athlete training, combined with implementing correct periodization models. Using these data collection methods will allow coaches to identify and adjust training before a decline in performance occurs.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 11:15am - 11:35am PDT
406 Sherrill Center

11:35am PDT

Ted Style Talk: We’re All Mad Here: Disparate Value And Care For Physical And Mental Health
People often care for their physical health more than their mental health. Stigma holds people back from talking about their mental health issues. Even when they are ready to discuss these issues, lack of education and high cost limits where and who they can contact to receive the necessary help. This talk will examine the use of outreach programs and organizations specializing in mental health to better educate community members and bridge the accessibility gap between medical providers. Establishing more collaborative care between mental health specialists and primary care physicians can improve accessibility, coordinate care and cut cost through reducing payment to a single bill. Another important method this talk will examine is the elimination of stigma for future generations through increased mental health awareness and education beginning at the elementary school levels. Increasingly, many programs and organizations utilizing these methods have found positive reports, such as patients reporting a higher quality of care, lowered cost in bills, a better understanding of mental health issues, and becoming more knowledgeable of local, qualified facilities capable of treating their needs. With these findings and new approaches to care, it becomes clear that the mind and body are equally important for one’s health and overall well-being. One cannot care for just a single part of the body and expect to thrive while the rest of their body is neglected. In fact, that expectation would be madness.

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Tuesday April 24, 2018 11:35am - 11:55am PDT
406 Sherrill Center

1:00pm PDT

Assessing The Muscle Activity In Hip Abductors And Hip Flexor Muscles During Various Exercises
The purpose of this study is to assess how various exercises generate muscle activity in the hip abductor and hip flexor muscles. We are recruiting healthy subjects above the age of 18 to participate in this study. Participants will complete a demographic questionnaire and will be asked to perform 12 exercises, three times while muscle activity is recorded. These exercises include: bridge, mountain climber, rope/elastic band clam flexors, TRX lateral balance lunge with rotation, TRX single leg hinge with rotation, TRX rear foot elevated foot lunge, lateral band walk, side-lying wall, single-leg forward reach, skater hop, side plank leg raise, and hip drops. Participants will be fitted with surface electromyographic (EMG) equipment to measure their muscle activity. Their body fat and lean mass will be measured using a dual energy x-ray absorptiometer (iDXA) scan. This information will be useful for developing exercise routines to prevent falls in older adults.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 1:00pm - 1:20pm PDT
406 Sherrill Center

1:20pm PDT

Cultural Competence In Improving Food Access In Immigrant Communities
I am reviewing the most culturally competent approaches to improving food access in immigrant communities. The goal of this research is to identify the purchasing, cooking and dietary choices, as well as to recognize the most advantageous approaches to improving food access, in ways that are appropriate for these populations. Food is at the heart of identity for people around the world. Our country also has a precedent set as a melting pot of cultures and identities. Our immigrant population is steadily increasing every year; the US Census anticipates, that within the next 25 years, population growth will result in over half of our population identifying as non-white, and that by 2060, 20% of Americans will be born outside of the country. In order to accommodate this population, we need to find new approaches to improving food access in immigrant communities. The “food desert” metric measures distance between supermarkets, which are a characteristically Western means of interacting with food. People of Latin, Asian and other backgrounds have dietary lifestyles that cannot be (nutritiously) accommodated by the selection in the average supermarket. Supermarkets perpetuate the Standard American Diet, which is associated with higher risk for heart disease, diabetes and obesity. Ethnic food markets have the capacity to bridge the gaps in food access for these communities. In the Asheville area, we are collecting data on the availability of fresh fruits and vegetables at Ethnic Food Markets. This will help to gain perspective on what is available regionally for nutrient dense options, as well as where opportunities lie for improvement.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 1:20pm - 1:40pm PDT
406 Sherrill Center

1:40pm PDT

Ethnic Food Landscape in Asheville
Ethnic food markets or ethnic food stores (defined as one that meets two of the three criteria, (a) ethnic name (b) prominently displayed ethnic symbols and/or (c) noticeably high presence of diverse food items associated with a particular ethnic cuisine) are often overlooked by food surveys nationwide. Research on healthy food access often focus on supermarkets/chain companies and their role in healthy eating, however, ethnic food markets are invaluable in that they provide healthy produce and products that are culturally acceptable to their target populations. In our research project, Ethnic Food Landscape in Asheville, we will investigate what the ethnic food market landscape in Asheville looks like overall, and whether the landscape is wide spread through the city or concentrated in a certain area. This research is led by Professor Jennifer Sanchez-Flack, and includes Harper Gande, Anniina Hirvonen, Joceline Rosas, and Leah Fagan in the Health and Wellness Promotion 499 undergraduate research course. Along with this research we will be surveying the fresh produce offered at these food stores, looking at both quantity and price of produce. This research will allow us to see whether or not the produce is affordable, readily available, and the variety of produce in the store. We will organize the data we find and create a clear and concise set for others to access.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 1:40pm - 2:00pm PDT
406 Sherrill Center